Hilleberg Tent choices

1:34 p.m. on February 3, 2010 (EST)
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So I am considering shelling out the cash on a high-end tent and have decided that Hilleberg will be getting it. I was then going to get one of their solo model tents and opted against that.

I have received the "Tent Handbook" f/Hilleberg and have narrowed my choices down to 3. The Saivo, the Tarra, and the Staika. The Kerlon 1800 fabric narrowed the choices down for me in regards to durability.

I feel this is a substantial investment for me as far as tents go and would like any feedback I can possibly get. I am kinda stuck on this one. I know the prices, specs, etc. I am really looking for user feedback or any feedback that pertains to these 3 particular models(ease of use, durability, etc.) Thanks everyone.

4:49 p.m. on February 3, 2010 (EST)
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I own the Jannu. It is without question, the best tent I own. I purchased it for winter camping, and have used it a number of time. Too havey for anything other than winter camping IMO. Needs alot of room with all the tie downs, but thats what you want in a winter tent. Worked great above tree line. Easy to setup, even in strong winds.

You can't go wrong with their products. It's alot to shell out, but you get what you pay for...

5:13 p.m. on February 3, 2010 (EST)
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I have a Saivo, it is the finest heavyduty tent I have ever had and is easy to erect in vile weather and stay DRY inside. I am going to "double pole" mine and I have an XP20 tarp to go with it. This makes a base camp in BC timber that keeps one truely comfortable and safe and I expect my two Rottweilers to pack it for me.

For most uses, I would choose a Jannu and would like to buy one, but, just bought another Rottweiler today, so, no more goodies for some time. I do have a Soulo and like it very much, but, in lighter tents, I tend to prefer Integral Designs singlewalls.

I do not like the flat roof area on the Tarra as too much snow can stick there and cause potential problems. I prefer the self-standing tents and domes to the other Hilles. and I now will only buy Hille. and ID, which are the best, IMO.

12:04 a.m. on February 5, 2010 (EST)
RETAILER
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So I am considering shelling out the cash on a high-end tent and have decided that Hilleberg will be getting it. I was then going to get one of their solo model tents and opted against that.

I have received the "Tent Handbook" f/Hilleberg and have narrowed my choices down to 3. The Saivo, the Tarra, and the Staika. The Kerlon 1800 fabric narrowed the choices down for me in regards to durability.

I feel this is a substantial investment for me as far as tents go and would like any feedback I can possibly get. I am kinda stuck on this one. I know the prices, specs, etc. I am really looking for user feedback or any feedback that pertains to these 3 particular models(ease of use, durability, etc.) Thanks everyone.

I would be interested to know what conditions that you plan to use this tent. What features interest you the most?

Out of the 3 models that you listed, I would say that the Staika sets up the fastest (3 poles).

Surprisingly, the Kerlon 1200 is stronger than other tent fabrics in terms of tear strength by quite a bit, so do not underestimate it.

If you need an expedition-worthy tent, then go with the 1800 Kerlon tents. Otherwise, the others would suit you well.

I owned and used a Tarra for awhile and it was overkill for my personal needs, so I sold it to a mountaineer. But it was and is an incredibly strong tent. Loved the durable poles, tent fabric and floor.

I now own and use the Kaitum and enjoy its spaciousness and lighter weight. But I am a fan of hoop style tents.

All of the Hilleberg shelters are well built, IMO. It just really depends on what your needs are.

DISCLAIMER: I am a retailer for Hilleberg.

6:38 p.m. on February 5, 2010 (EST)
MODERATOR
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I know someone on another board who has a Saivo. He posted some pics a while back from a winter trip in a pretty nasty storm in the Sierra. The Saivo was the tent that held up the best, according to his trip report.

Check out this thread on TLB, there are pics of his Saivo set up in the snow.

http://tinyurl.com/yeqm9r6

6:51 p.m. on February 5, 2010 (EST)
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Thanks Tom.

10:02 p.m. on February 5, 2010 (EST)
MODERATOR REVIEW CORPS
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Tipi Walter has some great photos of his various Hillebergs here on Trailspace, and lots more over on trailjournals

Whenever I am able to afford it, I will definitely be going for either the Nallo or Kaitum (need a spacious tent to keep the wife happy)

10:50 a.m. on February 7, 2010 (EST)
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So it looks like you decided on a dome/1800 type. They are the most weather proof and durable models, but also heavy. With those three, I'd go with the venerable Staika for two folks. At 8 pounds, lighter than the other two and plenty tough. I just got one myself. Why I chose the Staika:

1. Great ventilating for a winter capable tent

2. Easy to pitch/small footprint

3. 2 Doors/Vestibules w side entry

4. Strong/Stable

5. Roomy for 2, palatial for 1

6. Completely freestanding (set up anywhere it fits)

I tried it out last week (in the yard) during a winter storm. 1/2 inch of freezing rain and 7 inches of wet snow. No problem. I set it up during the storm in 20 mile/hr winds myself. So it works very well in winter weather. Also, can open up and ventilate well in warm weather (more so than Saivo or Tarra). If you plan on using it only in hard winter, then these two are even stronger than Staika, but not as good for warm weather and bigger footprint.

If you plan on backpacking solo (or using your own shelter) and still want a 2 person dome, I recommend a lighter solution. Either the Allak or Jannu (both 2 person) weigh a little more than 6 pounds. The Allak is similar to Staika but a little smaller and not as stout. The Jannu is almost as tough as the 1800 models, more suited to hard winter than Allak.

11:51 a.m. on February 7, 2010 (EST)
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Although you can save weight by getting a tunnel, the domes have more advantages than are listed in the Hilleberg Catalouge. They mention that domes are better for beaches, rock, ledges, and snow loading, but also;

1. In many backcountry settings, camp sites are designated and are often quite small. The smaller tunnels (akto/nallo/nammatj) aren't too long but the others may not fit too well. Some sites are even made of wood or very hard packed clay/gravel.

2. In most conditions in wooded areas, guy lines don't need to be deployed with domes...a lot less to trip over.

3. Domes easier to dry out/move around in the field and at home. (try to set up a tunnel in you basement)

4. When 'car camping', you can put 2 or more domes on a typical tent pad. Only one fully set up tunnel will fit.

Yes, the tunnels do have their place and advantages (flat, open terrain). I originally got a Kaitum for it's space to weight ratio. It's a beauty when setup, very comfy. However, it can be a challange in the wooded, rocky, and almost never flat terrain of the Ozarks to find a proper place for it. I may sell it soon. I think the domes are generally more versatile over a wider range of activities.

3:14 p.m. on February 7, 2010 (EST)
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The weight doesn't worry me much. I don't mind weight as long as it can be justified. My Mountain Pass came in at 8lbs. I will be using this tent primarily in the winter months plus a bit in the fall. As far as location, all over the nation and then some. I would like to stick w/a dome. I am not much of a fan of "tube tents."

September 23, 2014
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