Gigapower torch

3:01 p.m. on March 10, 2010 (EST)
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Got my gigapower torch today - WOW, its a monster.

Jim S

3:09 p.m. on March 10, 2010 (EST)
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Here's an idea: find an RV park and offer to fix people's plumbing with it. When their plastic pipes come out looking like one of Salvador Dali's leftovers you can lecture them on hiring non-union plumbers.

5:06 p.m. on March 10, 2010 (EST)
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Lets just say that any propane torch would be better for soldering pipes than this one, BUT for lighting fires this is way out there. I'm going backpacking Sunday so I'll take it along instead of my stove. This won't need no stinking windscreen thats fer sure.

Jim S

5:40 p.m. on March 10, 2010 (EST)
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I know you could survive a month out there without a stove so I'm not really worried... but could you refresh our memory on how you plan to cook with that thing?

8:00 p.m. on March 10, 2010 (EST)
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I'm going to put on a glove and hold my pan over it. Unless I'm boiling water I generally hold the pan in my hand anyway and keep it moving so I don't burn my food. It should take only about 30 seconds to boil a pan of water...

Jim

9:15 p.m. on March 10, 2010 (EST)
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I can't help but think of using it to get a nice sear on a steak.

Looking forward to hearing what you think of it Jim S.

Snow Peak is not cheap, but I love what little bit of their stuff I own.

9:19 p.m. on March 10, 2010 (EST)
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I keep imagining Jim whipping up some creme brulee in the backcountry.

10:36 p.m. on March 10, 2010 (EST)
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Alicia that does sound really good. I'll check out a recipe, can you use cognac in it I wonder?

Jim

11:59 p.m. on March 10, 2010 (EST)
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Ok Alicia,

I found a recipe for creme brulee. I can make it the night before and pack in one of my plastic peanut butter jars (my favorite food containers). I'll make Chicken Catchatori and creme brulee and take pictures, but you have to promise to backpack with me next time your are in Oregon so I can make it for you. photos to come - I'll be cooking dinner along the McKenzie River Sunday night.

Jim S

6:59 a.m. on March 11, 2010 (EST)
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Wow, Jim. I think you are about to win the fanciest-backpacking-dinner-ever award! Yes, you must take pictures of this and post them here once you're back.

And if I'm in Oregon for some backpacking I will definitely look you (and the creme brulee) up.

7:22 p.m. on March 11, 2010 (EST)
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I got a chance to try out my new Snow Peak gigapower torch today. It will adapt to CB or the normal OD canisters. If you remove the CB adapter it weighs 5.8 oz in the mode shown in the photo.

I turned it on just cracking the valve and got about an 8 inch flame over an inch in diameter, plenty to start a campfire from seaweed. :) In 7 minutes it burned just under .6 oz of fuel, so it would burn well over an hour at this rate on the 220 gram fuel bottle (about 80 minutes). I put 16 ounces of tap water into an uncovered one liter titanium pan which I held over the flame and it was at a rolling boil in 3.5 minutes outside in a wind and 50 degrees F.

For those who just boil water this might be a really nice piece of gear as it requires no windscreen. I generally cook by holding the pan above the stove with my hand and keeping it moving so I don't scorch my food and have complete control over the cooking process so its no hardship to me that I can't set it down. I will be cooking pasta with it this weekend, and we will use it to light a campfire in a damp forest to cook our steaks with, which would be a daunting task using vasoline in cotton wads! :goodjob:

So I used the same fuel bottle which was kinda cooled already and I should have warmed it up but I didn't. I turned the gas all the way up and put the titanium pan over it with ten ounces of water for a cup of coffee. In 40 seconds it was hot enough and the flame was going down a lot because the fuel bottle was chilling. In 60 seconds the water was at a rolling boil but the flames was getting down a lot as the canister wa really cold by then. It burned .2 ounce og +- .05oz.
Jim

9:29 p.m. on March 17, 2010 (EDT)
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Jim, if you're back from the woods, we'd like to know how this worked out there.

11:49 p.m. on March 17, 2010 (EDT)
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Tom, Alica et all

My friend does not frequent this forum so I can speak candidly. He was not interested in Cream Brulee, and I don't cook things for people that they won't appreciate so I'll save that for another time, perhaps I shall pepare it when and if Alicia visits. (:->) I have cooked steaks over a campfire for him twice in the past and he is a grocer so he brought 3 ribeyes and a flank steak for the dog.

I threw in my "sawviver" folding frame saw but he insisted that we didn't need it and that he would have a fire going in no time and I left it in his van. So we hiked through the almost rain forest with moss in the trees (see my photo entry under landscapes - its along this trail) and found one spot in 6 miles where a path was worn down to the river to an obvious but illegal campspot right on the shore with a fire pit. (this area is so verdant that there would actually be less impact camping ten feet from the river than up on the plateau above it) but we camped 100 yards from the river because of the noise - its white water.

So my friend was starving by the time we hiked half a mile back to the site after giving up on finding a better one and set to work collecting firewood. Most of the wood was 3/8 to 1/2 inch diameter and so wet it was hard to break. Anyway he made a pile of it in the campfire ring and started an esbit under it and then poured 8 ounces of alcohol on it that he brought for that purpose. While it did burn a bit, it did not have sufficient heat to dry out the firewood and get a sustaining fire going and he was starving so he said I could use my torch if I didn't post anything about him not being able to start the fire. So I made a higher pile and aimed the torch into the smaller stuff underneath and left it turned on pretty much at full blast for 5 minutes burning 1.5 to 2 ounces of gas. This did provide enough heat up through the pile to warm and dry the wood and get it going but I knew there would be no coals.

I had taken my (coughlans?) 12 ounce stainless steel camp grill with folding legs and I set it over the pile of wood and put the first two steaks on it right in the flames. This sears the outside and chars it a bit and the secret is to turn it once a minute until done. They were delicious and then I cooked the third steak and Bennies flank steak which I cut up and cooled before giving it to him.

After sharing 3 ribeyes we didn't want the fettucini and alfredo sauce so I brought it home and cooked it for dinner with my wife the next night.

The torch did exactly what I wanted it to do. It throws a huge flame, more like a weed burner than a propane torch. It is really cool for heating coffee water. There is no way we could have lit the camp fire without it and we would have had raw steaks, something that I could eat but my friend will only eat "burned" steak...

This was my first trip with a hammock and in the morning I sat in the hammock with the fuel bottle between my knees and holding the pan over the torch in a glove hand oly took a minute to heat water for coffe. It was about 35 degrees so the fuel bottle cooled quickly and when I made instant oatmeal I had to set the fuel bottle in the pan of warm water to warm the fuel. I carry a small piece of micro-fleece "hair towel" and used it to wipe the botom of the fuel container.

The night before going to bed I boiled over a quart of water to let it cool over night and fill my canteen for the hike out. It was a pain holding the heavy pan over the stove for 5 minutes, but I only drank a few ounces hiking out so I didn't need to boil that much anyway. And I took no water filter and frankly I'm sure the river water is purer than the water many of our members get out of their faucets at home.

A nice piece of gear. 5.8 ounces and the only tool that I know of that wll help you light a camp fire in a rain forest.

wow thats the longest post I've done in a very long time.

Jim S

12:48 a.m. on March 18, 2010 (EDT)
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Wow, impressive. Next test: Starting a fire in a kelp forest! (Hey, you were burning seaweed, right, Jim?)

The thing sounds like a monster. Another piece of gear to be envious of, I suppose. (How long was that flame again?)

12:46 p.m. on March 18, 2010 (EDT)
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your friend was "not interested" in creme brule?? If anyone packing with me wanted to fix something so scrumptious I wouldn't be the one to hold 'em back!

Sounds like quite a flamethrower for such a nifty lil' gadget :)

10:49 p.m. on March 18, 2010 (EDT)
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Heres the photo

9:43 a.m. on March 19, 2010 (EDT)
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Looks like it's swallowing Comet Hale-Bopp!

11:44 a.m. on March 21, 2010 (EDT)
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Wowsers! That is some flame thrower, Jim.

Now that everyone knows about your culinary prowess, they'll be showing up at your campsite looking to score some steak and creme brulee.

August 31, 2014
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