Need help with camping luggage

10:56 a.m. on May 19, 2010 (EDT)
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Need luggage for camping trip. What’s better – backpack or a rolling bag?

11:43 a.m. on May 19, 2010 (EDT)
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Whats a rolling bag?

I use a backpack, different size ones for different length trips (daypack, 3-5 day pack and a multiweek pack)

Check out www.rei.com Recreational Equipment Inc.

And www.golite.com Lightweight hiking gear.

1:47 p.m. on May 19, 2010 (EDT)
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I don't think a rolling bag would be very effective, unless everywhere you camp is completely paved.

6:20 p.m. on May 19, 2010 (EDT)
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Are you car camping, hiking into camp or what?

Ed

6:47 p.m. on May 19, 2010 (EDT)
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Rolling bags work great as a way to move your pack through the airport on your flight to the place where you will be jumping off to your camping area, and to protect the backpack from the airline luggage gorillas. The one problem with them is where to stash them while you are camping. Plus, they work very poorly once you are off the pavement, even the ones with straps that purport to make the rollaround into a backpack.

9:50 p.m. on May 19, 2010 (EDT)
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Rolling bags work great as a way to move your pack through the airport on your flight to the place where you will be jumping off to your camping area, and to protect the backpack from the airline luggage gorillas. The one problem with them is where to stash them while you are camping. Plus, they work very poorly once you are off the pavement, even the ones with straps that purport to make the rollaround into a backpack.

So what do you suggest?

10:57 p.m. on May 19, 2010 (EDT)
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for car camping, anything between a leaf/lawn bag and a duffel bag will do the job - wheels probably unnecessary. a backpack is probably unnecessary too. daypack would probably be enough for any hike.

for a hiking trip where you are walking to where you camp and carrying your gear, definitely a backpack. duffels and roller duffels aren't feasible or comfortable to take on trails.

i have occasionally put my big backpack inside a large duffel or roller duffel if i'm flying to the part of the country where i'm hiking/climbing - the duffel protects the pack, straps, hardware from getting snagged or torn. the empty duffel gets left at someone's house or the back of a car while out on the trail.

9:10 a.m. on May 20, 2010 (EDT)
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I am planning on travelling next year for some mountaineering and was probably going to go the duffel route.

10:16 a.m. on May 20, 2010 (EDT)
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EstherMayer, can you tell us a little more about your requirements? Do you need the rolling bag to park at the base camp or your car and will you carry a separate backpack for actual hiking? Or are you looking for only one of these bags?

10:31 a.m. on May 20, 2010 (EDT)
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I haven't the foggiest idea what EstherMayer is looking for but I can tell you that Osprey makes a great, lightweight duffel bag that fits up to a 137 liter pack (lord knows if there is one that big) specifically designed to house your pack as it goes through airport security and such. That in combination with one of the steel nets sold at various stores that wrap around your bag so people can't just open it up makes for an extra measure of security when sending your bag into the abyssal unknown of airport luggage handling.

11:07 a.m. on May 20, 2010 (EDT)
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I actually like the idea of carrying two bags. I think I’ll do that. We still haven’t zeroed in on a destination, but plan to be stationed at a base camp and then go hiking on the trails.

12:24 p.m. on May 20, 2010 (EDT)
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zalmen,

When heading off for an expedition that requires airplane travel, the rollaround with the backpack in it helps in the airport. Usually, I stay in a B&B, hostel, hostal, or hotel near the airport. They are usually (never had a turndown) willing to store the rollaround (with the town-clothes in it) until I return from the wilderness for the last night in town and a hot shower. On those treks that require hauling a big load in a sled (like my avatar photo at the left, in Antarctica), I need a big duffel to keep stuff together in the sled. So I fold an empty OR duffel into the rollaround. Sometimes I just put the gear in the duffel.

Esthermayer -

You mention the idea of carrying two bags. Keep in mind that the airlines these days are eager to collect extra revenue. So most airlines charge a fee for the second checked bag on "domestic" flights and some charge for all checked bags. And some have fees for carry-ons (first underseat bag free, but that extra "personal" bag may get a fee).

Plus, there are all sorts of fees for oversize (measured in the weird arcane way of adding length to width to depth - which isn't volume, but does allow them to charge extra for some skis and kayak paddles), overweight, or both.

I have run into one case when planning an upcoming trip where the flight involves a first domestic leg, then the international leg on the same airline, followed by a short hop in the destination country on a "partner" airline, where there is a charge for the second checked bag on the first "domestic" leg, but 2 checked bags free for the international leg, then only one checked bag and one "small" carryon allowed on the in-country leg (huge fee for a second checked bag).

So be sure you find out exactly what the airlines' policies are - I discovered that travel agents do not always know, plus the rules seem to change frequently these days.

9:14 a.m. on May 21, 2010 (EDT)
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EstherMayer, you could check the latest entrant into the outdoor luggage market – Briggs & Riley’s BRX collection. They have a couple of rolling bags you can look at. I’d suggest the 22” Explore upright (http://www.briggs-riley.com/category/productDetail.aspx?id=Explore-22-Upright_BU122X ) if you’re going for 3-4 days. If you plan to carry a separate backpack, you may want to find out your air carrier’s policies like Bill suggested.

9:35 a.m. on May 25, 2010 (EDT)
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Martin, that’s a great bag. In fact, I have been checking out other options from BRX (http://www.briggs-riley.com/category/group.aspx?col=BRX) as well. Must admit, it’s an interesting collection.

4:36 p.m. on May 30, 2010 (EDT)
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I have an Osprey Porter 46 pack and I absolutly love it! It was designed to fit the max carry-on for flights and it's so lightweight and comfortable you can walk right off of the plane and onto the trail. I use it for backpacking and all other travel I do for work!

If your gear has wheels it's not camping.

10:05 p.m. on May 30, 2010 (EDT)
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When car camping, we and all our scouts, use large plastic bins. It often rains on us but if the boys keep their things in the bin they will have dry clothing even if the tent leaks. The bin also makes a handy table inside the tent. The bins stack much better than a lot of varied suitcases during transit as well. If we will be doing backpacking from a base camp, we also take our backpacks and gear for the trail but we leave our non-essentials in the bins when we go.

9:58 a.m. on June 8, 2010 (EDT)
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Finally, taken the plunge and ordered the Explore 22” Upright (http://www.briggs-riley.com/category/productDetail.aspx?id=Explore-22-Upright_BU122X) from Briggs & Riley that Martin suggested. I was also tempted to buy the backpack under this collection, but decided to make do with my existing daypack for some more time.

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