Oldest piece of equipment you still take backpacking?

9:13 p.m. on January 8, 2011 (EST)
308 reviewer rep
56 forum posts

I was digging through all my gear yesterday, and it dawned on me that there are very few things that I still had from when I first went backpacking in 1990 or so. 

 

I believe my oldest piece of gear is the Outdoor Research gaters from around 1994. It made me wonder what kind of ancient goods all you trail masters still use on an outing!

 

 

 

2:01 a.m. on January 9, 2011 (EST)
REVIEW CORPS
1,245 reviewer rep
1,270 forum posts

I've got you beat by a long shot :)

I still use my Kelty D4 (external frame pack) that I bought in ~1978.

4:43 a.m. on January 9, 2011 (EST)
33 reviewer rep
201 forum posts

That would be me... Everything else is relatively new.

10:13 a.m. on January 9, 2011 (EST)
REVIEW CORPS
1,195 reviewer rep
1,064 forum posts

I regularly wear a pair of 35+ year-old Pivetta P-8 hiking boots. They've got me by at least 6 years.

10:30 a.m. on January 9, 2011 (EST)
102 reviewer rep
2,285 forum posts

In active use:

Plastic cat hole shovel circa 1966.

Cammenga compass circa 1968

Swiss army knife circa 1968

Various NF stuff sacks circa 1966 – 1970

Kelty Sonora (external frame expedition size) pack circa 1975

Trailwise 60/40 parka circa 1976

Oh yea, I still have a couple of pairs of gaitors too, from the mid 1980s

Other stuff too, but can’t recall right now.

Ed

8:31 p.m. on January 9, 2011 (EST)
MODERATOR
38 reviewer rep
1,757 forum posts

I have a Sigg Tourist kit with the Svea 123, not sure of the vintage.  Some of my gear is from around 1986 when I bought gear for my trip to NZ - SD bag, Swiss Army knife, MSR XGK stove, small cookkit, some clothes, got my MacPac bag around then too. I've got an old pair of Chouinard Supergaitors someone was throwing away-date back to 1983 according to Patagonia (I asked).

8:47 p.m. on January 9, 2011 (EST)
308 reviewer rep
56 forum posts

Woah... you all have me beat by ten years at least. I'm curious how 35+ yr old boots hold up???

 

 

9:29 p.m. on January 9, 2011 (EST)
200 reviewer rep
4,136 forum posts

Tho I rebought my current Svea 123 I used to have the same stove I first bought in 1978. I have a old Kelty ski touring pack I bought in 1979. I still have my original polypropolene long johns I bought in 1978. And my North Face Goretex Rainpants I also bought in 1978.

10:20 p.m. on January 9, 2011 (EST)
MODERATOR REVIEW CORPS
998 reviewer rep
3,475 forum posts

Swiss Army Knife - 1982

MSR Whisperlite - 1987

The rest of my gear is late 90's to present.

The SAK is missing one of the scales (handle) but still does what a SAK does, and the Whisperlite is almost unstoppable.

12:42 a.m. on January 10, 2011 (EST)
173 reviewer rep
100 forum posts

SVEA 123-1984?

Goretex Parka -1989?

Polypro snivel gear -1990?

Poncho- 1995?

Compass- 1985?

Issue ALICE pack (for heavy loads, used occasionally) -1994?

MSR Dromedary-1996?

Nothing really ancient, but I am only 41!

I will admit, some of my new "fancy pants" gear is very nice too. My new pack is superb, I am absolutely overjoyed with it's performance.

The younger set I sometimes hike with, have new gear everytime we go out. Half the time it doesn't work. Slowly but surely, they are copying my setup, and not sweating how light their pack is.

11:12 a.m. on January 10, 2011 (EST)
171 reviewer rep
223 forum posts

An old pair of HH polypro long john. (1996) All my friends harass me to change them, but I cant find it in my heart to not bring them with me everytime we go out. I really should have them put up as a trophy in a decorative casing on the wall. That way they would stay with me. 

11:30 a.m. on January 10, 2011 (EST)
REVIEW CORPS
1,195 reviewer rep
1,064 forum posts

@humble 67: They are stout! I recieved them just a couple of months ago, after having been worn once and stored for 35 years by the previous owner. It will take me a good 200 miles or so to break them in, methinks. This lengthly break-in process--or moreso the discomfort associated with it--is likely what dissuaded the previous owner from wearing them more often. I plan on having a pair of 65+ year-old Pivetta P-8's in about 30 years. I'm certain they'll last that long, provided I find a good cobbler...

12:14 p.m. on January 10, 2011 (EST)
200 reviewer rep
4,136 forum posts

Was just thinking my oldest peice of equipmet is my Brunton Boy Scout Compass that I got in 1968. I rarely use it anymore but keep it for its meaning of my Boy Scout days and still take it with me backpacking, never know when it might save my life!

8:28 p.m. on January 10, 2011 (EST)
5 reviewer rep
74 forum posts

1971 - REI Down Bag ("Icelandic Special")

1975 Lowe Expedition pack.

1977 Gore-Tex Bivi Sac

1980 MSR XGK Stove

Bob-cooking.jpg
Cooking last summer with MSR XGK

S-Sister-064cr.jpg
On the trail last summer with the Lowe pack.

12:30 a.m. on January 11, 2011 (EST)
5 reviewer rep
74 forum posts


DSCF2172adjcr.jpg
A better shot of my 30 year old XGK in action.

9:45 a.m. on January 11, 2011 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
1,075 forum posts

I love the Lowe, metal hardware on the side compression straps.

11:50 a.m. on January 11, 2011 (EST)
36 reviewer rep
148 forum posts

lexan spoon

12:19 p.m. on January 19, 2011 (EST)
RETAILER
5 reviewer rep
47 forum posts

I am by far the oldest piece of equipment that I haul around. In the summer I bring a Slumberjack Hiker /Biker bag I bought at Campmor in the early eighties. Still works down to 40 degrees. I think I bought my Lexan soup spoons around the same time. everything else has been replaced. Now if I could just replace my feet I'd be good for another 30 years.

cheers,

thetentman

12:39 p.m. on January 19, 2011 (EST)
37 reviewer rep
140 forum posts

My "squishy" Australian leather bush hat that I take on all my hikes for the last 15 years. 

1:31 p.m. on January 19, 2011 (EST)
15 reviewer rep
40 forum posts

I still use plenty of gear from the 80's, like a Wilderness Experience 5 pocket pack which has thousands of miles on it and has been resewn, and surely some from the 70's but definitely my oldest pieces are cook gear from WW2 surplus [assuming it isn't WW1 :) ] and my boy scout compass from about 1964.

That doesn't count I still sometimes carry my Dad's knife which is far older than I or other old small fixed blade and pocket knives I collect and use, a few dating back into the 1800's.

1:40 p.m. on January 19, 2011 (EST)
19 reviewer rep
11 forum posts

At almost 69 years< I, too, can say I am the oldest piece I haul up into the hills.  As far as what I carry -- probably my old Trailwise external-frame from the 1960's with its third or fourth custom made sack.  Carried 52.5 pounds comfortably with it last summer at the start of an extended trip.  Beyond that, I have a great deal of gear that I "collected" in the early 1970's when I was involved in a number of different areas of the gear business.

1:52 p.m. on January 19, 2011 (EST)
6 reviewer rep
1 forum posts

I just updated my sleeping pad from a 1990 inflatable (like a small bounce house) to a new Thermo-rest Neo Air. This was by far my best upgrade ever. I also still carry and old compass of my Dad's from his time spent in Vietnam, I would guess that at about 40 years old now. I've updated to GPS, but I still teach my boys how to use the compass.

My most useful old piece of equipment is my Whisperlite stove, which I bought around 1988, it works better now than when it was new.

2:35 p.m. on January 19, 2011 (EST)
RETAILER BRAND REP
0 reviewer rep
1 forum posts

Grew up backpacking & skiing in the Montana/Canadian Rockies. 9 months of winter & 3 months of bad sledding y'know. :-) Then went all over the Northern Cascades & Olympics. Did some of the Swiss Alps too. So I've been through a lot of gear. Here is my dive into my stuff: trusty blue, nylon jacket from REI '77 same old red, multi-zipper backpack around same time that has flags from the countries I've hiked in. Gordini cross country ski gloves, poly+leather, maybe mid 80's

But I must say that my most recent find, but probably the oldest of all gear, is saving my old knees & ankles & back...my wood walking sticks.

3:57 p.m. on January 19, 2011 (EST)
4 reviewer rep
10 forum posts

I still take out upon occassion my Optimust 8R and Svea 123 stoves.  Although I have new stoves, I still love this old ones as they still work great after hundreds of times used.  My daughters call them my antiques.

4:22 p.m. on January 19, 2011 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
1 forum posts

Marmot featherweight goretex tent 1979.

svea 123 stove

swiss army knife(champion) 1979

I had to upgrade in 1992 due to losing most of my equipment in a house fire the tent and stove survived otherwise I'm sure I would still be using my Kelty external frame pack and north face sleeping bag.

Jans port external frame pack is still in my inventory with the leather &  metal hip belt.  I have been using a Dana Designs internal frame since the early 90's 

11:01 a.m. on January 20, 2011 (EST)
2 reviewer rep
1 forum posts

 The oldest piece of camping equiptment that I still use is a military "John Wayne" can opener!

6:03 p.m. on January 20, 2011 (EST)
REVIEW CORPS
1,397 reviewer rep
442 forum posts

My knees...

9:21 a.m. on January 21, 2011 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
1 forum posts

I am with XterroBrando.  Knees are certainly old and worn.  Like TreeGuy, I often use an Icelandic Special from the early 70s.  Also a REI jacket and Holubar Expedition Parka from same time frame.  Optimus 111B and Svea 123 too.  Their is a quality about them, perhaps memories, that makes their outings with me very special.  I am surre it is the same with other members too.

M

2:28 p.m. on January 21, 2011 (EST)
MODERATOR REVIEW CORPS
658 reviewer rep
2,148 forum posts

My uncle's M65 Olive USAF jacket and liner.

Not really practical for backpacking, because the jacket is heavy and made of cotton, but I love the old thing. So for car camping or a fair weather hike, it is my favorite.

I also have some really old wool sweaters. I don't know exatly how old they are, but at least from the 50's or 60's.

4:48 p.m. on January 21, 2011 (EST)
49 reviewer rep
3 forum posts

Up until last year I was still using my external frame pack from 1984(?).  I still use my SVEA 123 stove from that time also.

11:00 a.m. on January 22, 2011 (EST)
15 reviewer rep
40 forum posts

Gonzan, those old jackets and liners are something else aren't they? And I almost hate to say it but it is one time cotton can work outdoors in the winter cause once it freezes it acts as a wind break while the liner keeps you toasty. I guess the outer still breathes too.

I remember as a kid having both the jacket and pants and lined but uninsulated pac boots with double wool socks and would play outside all day long in Rochester blizzards and snowbanks and drifts, boots evantually filled of water and none of us got frostbit.

Just this morning I pulled an old Swedish army parka out of my collection to shovel a little snow, fill the birdfeeders and just enjoy the cold +1f and snow we are having. I was toasty. My wife thinks I'm nuts but...man are those coats heavy.

Reminds me too of another heavy coat-a sheepskin coat-one time in the dead of winter in the ADK High Peaks I sat in a snowbank and ate lunch while watching a Ranger check backpackers gear as they headed into the interior. A man dressed in wool, snowshoed up the trail wearing a frame pack and on top was a sheepskin coat strapped to it. The Ranger only watched him walk by.

I wander, sorry.

4:06 p.m. on January 28, 2011 (EST)
75 reviewer rep
306 forum posts

Well, since I just started hiking a few years ago, I think that my Leatherman wave (2003) is the "oldest" thing that I take with me.  Everything else is right around 3 years old or newer.

12:01 a.m. on February 2, 2011 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
19 forum posts

Peak 1 back pack with flex frame and a Peak 1 multifuel stove. I bought both for a trip on the AT throuh the smokys in 1980. Just used the stove two weeks ago on a trip into Joyce Kilmer. It is my choice for cold temperatures. I replaced the pack for backpacking about a year or two ago however, I still use it for carrying my rock climbing gear.

12:35 a.m. on February 2, 2011 (EST)
87 reviewer rep
1,061 forum posts

@Fal Thats a P38 can opener.LOL

I still have an old Alice pack that I use for light day hikes and climbs...It's from the 1970's..I think my father gave it to me....I also have my boy scout knife spoon fork combo knife...Man thats things old I dont use it but brings back memories...

7:19 a.m. on February 2, 2011 (EST)
36 reviewer rep
148 forum posts

One thing I really regret as I peruse these replys is I wish I still had all the equipment I purchased since I first started backpacking way back in the , Good God! 60`s. I could have a museum. My advice to anyone who is just starting out or who still has original equipment, if you can - hang on to it. It will be a great source of nostalgia in 40 years or so.

9:06 a.m. on February 2, 2011 (EST)
MODERATOR REVIEW CORPS
658 reviewer rep
2,148 forum posts

Tsar,

Man, sorry I missed your comments on the old coats! I love seeing old school, unconventional coats and clothing. It would be so great to have a Sheepskin coat! Oiled or smoked leather, fur inside, were the original Water Proof Breathable winter jackets :) and I dare say they probably worked better than most of our modern ones.

It sounds like that Ranger was a good one- I loath officials who are devoid of common sense and reasonable judgement. I have met some who would be saying "NO. You must stop! I must inspect and harrass you. You might be wearing wool and using snowshoes, but there could be nothing in your pack." 

BTW, It's great to see you around again, its been nearly a year since your last post, and I always enjoy your comments.

9:53 a.m. on February 2, 2011 (EST)
15 reviewer rep
40 forum posts

Gonzan, thanks, nice to be back, I was reading some just wasn't posting.

The thing with old stuff, it still works, it might not be the best for certain situations but...what is?

I've collected lots of old things, useable good things, over the years and use them mixed in with the new and that is probably why I have always remembered the man with the sheepskin coat and to this day I always wondered if it was also his sleeping gear? I wish I had asked.

You are right about the Rangers, like police, some are boneheads and some are more than reasonable and are quite helpful and friendly etc, I guess they are just a reflection of the rest of us :)

12:43 p.m. on February 2, 2011 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
28 forum posts

That would be me... Everything else is relatively new.

 Lol....i have to agree.

Been backpacking since the mid 70's and did so with a lot of older gear until recently.

Approximately 2yrs ago i went on a major spending spree and replaced every single item including all clothing.

No...i was'nt trying to impress anyone as i'm a soloist.

I was actually trying to rid myself of old-school mentality and hanging on to old way out dated gear.

I'm not having more fun but am considerably lighter. 

1:47 p.m. on February 2, 2011 (EST)
102 reviewer rep
2,285 forum posts

One thing I really regret as I peruse these replys is I wish I still had all the equipment I purchased since I first started backpacking way back in the , Good God! 60`s. I could have a museum. My advice to anyone who is just starting out or who still has original equipment, if you can - hang on to it. It will be a great source of nostalgia in 40 years or so.

Indeed, but who has room for a museum?  I have passed most ofmy old gear on, like a good book, for others to enjoy.  Getting started in this sport costs a fair amount of money, often forcing folks to cut back on their aspirations until they can afford the equipment.  Hand me down stoves, packs, tents, and other big ticket items will jump start a newbie's entrance into the wilderness. 

Ed

2:38 p.m. on February 2, 2011 (EST)
MODERATOR REVIEW CORPS
658 reviewer rep
2,148 forum posts

 I have passed most ofmy old gear on, like a good book, for others to enjoy... Hand me down stoves, packs, tents, and other big ticket items will jump start a newbie's entrance into the wilderness.

 Great thoughts, Ed!

I have been extremely blessed by having a friend who is a gearhound who passes on lots of stuff to me through trade, sale, or just gift. He is a military medic, EMT, technichal guru, outdoor nut, and into everything. It's like having a personal gear tester :p

I have been able to pass on a lot of stuff to my younger siblings and friends, and plan to do even more of that as I acquire new gear and refine my kit. Hopefully I can be as positive and generous of an influence others as my friend has been to me.

8:16 a.m. on February 3, 2011 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
19 forum posts

A couple years ago  before I upgraded anything I joned a hiking group. They were mostly new to the sport. They all had new backpacking gear and nearly everything I packed with including boots were over 25 + years old. I was a backpacking antigue. Got a lot of questions which led to a lot of old stories. My gear was both old and  comparatively cheap and I guess that was the foundation of the handle "ghetto hiker" Most had never seen a canteen on the trail before  :) I started packing in the late 60's and those of you around then know that much of the technology we see today wasn't around or was too expensive for the average joe. A lot of ingenuity and creativity went into making or modifing your  gear to perform better. Some times its nice to get all the old stuff back out and do a few days in the woods . ( eexcept My old tent had to be put to rest ) Thought of getting a few people together that were old school who too had old gear and do a "History Hike" as it were.

9:22 a.m. on February 3, 2011 (EST)
15 reviewer rep
40 forum posts

:)

Ghetto that kind of sounds like me years ago, especially when I did SAR'S. It sounds kind of funny now and was kind of funny then too since, more than once, I led the team in and out of the woods, me in my old fashioned stuff and them in their new and I am pretty sure they weren't letting me lead so they could keep an eye on me.

I agree with the above comments-share your extra gear if possible but be sure it isn't wasted. Might be better to sell it cheap at a garage sale to someone interested than give it to someone who only takes it to make you feel good.

And if you can't share your gear, share your knowledge and experience. There are plenty of deserving and interested people out there who would like to know what you do.

For the last few years I have taken two kids under my wing and have atempted to share some of my knowledge. Now teens, they would survive Adirondack winter nights, save or rescue someone and/or get home. They don't watch the wrist compass as often as I like [we mostly bushwhack] but their woods smarts and youthful energy probably make up for that and in time...all things come.

This year I begin with my grandkids.

1:25 p.m. on February 3, 2011 (EST)
75 reviewer rep
306 forum posts

The older stuff might not be as lightweight as a lot of the newer stuff, but things just seemed (to me) to be made much better back in the days (and this is coming from someone born in the 80s!--LOL).  I read all of these stories of these guys who still have and use their stoves from the 70's and before, packs and bags too.  I guess it is safe to say, "they don't make'em like they used to"...  Now that's not to say the stuff out there today isn't good or even great, just something to think about in 20+ years from now, to see how the current stuff holds up.

4:32 p.m. on February 4, 2011 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
1,236 forum posts


DSC03254.jpg

DSC03228.jpg
Still use my Ring Oval Intention w/ custom fly (first one got destroyed) once in a great while 1976/77.

Just took my Holubar bag out of retirement for 1-2 season use.  I'd guess early 80's.  Not sure as I bought it at a garage sale for $15 back in the day.

I also still use Boy Scout fork/knife/spoon set and pots and lots of little suff as well.

10:59 p.m. on February 7, 2011 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
19 forum posts

D&G  , not sure that it was made better, just it seems that durability and light weight is often one opposite ends of the spectrum. Weight was a factor but not as much an issue as it is today . There were some different concerns  30 years ago i.e the fact that a stove was "multifuel" was useful at a time when there were fewer stores in the away places that carried supplies . If your stove was light weight but limited to one type of fuel, you might have to do without on an extended trip or a thru hike. Now,that supplies are carried by more places and "thru hiking" occurs more often that there is more money to be made carrying supplies , thats not as big a concern. I find new hikers are overly weight conscience. They will cut the handle down on a spoon to save .004 of a gram :). The older hikers seem to live with a little more weight, a little more comfort and hike with something they know and feel is dependable. They know the importance of owning  something that they can count on in that unsuspected circumstance than  just to own the lightest newest piece of equipement on the market.

TSAR: I use to hike with my son, he is away now, I have adopted or should I say I have been adopted by a small group about 30 years younger that I hike and climb with. They are always telling me to go -lighter! Then again , I haven't had the wet butt to dry by the fire or cover my feet with plastic because my boots were wet and had to hike out in the snow. It is a blending of ideas and we all learn a little.:)

7:08 a.m. on February 8, 2011 (EST)
75 reviewer rep
306 forum posts

Ghetto,
I agree fully with what you are saying, I was just noting that most items today in general fit into that category.  It actually is harder to find the "dependable" items sometimes than it is the UL and Lightweight items.  It seems "light" has flooded the market. Just my opinion.

11:36 a.m. on February 8, 2011 (EST)
15 reviewer rep
40 forum posts

Ghetto; I hike sometimes with a young man who 'goes light' and I have plenty of times had to feed him or clothe him and I had hoped he'd pick up on his mistake and find the balance.

So far he hasn't so he'll be in for a surprise one day in the future ;)

7:02 p.m. on February 8, 2011 (EST)
MODERATOR REVIEW CORPS
998 reviewer rep
3,475 forum posts

After digging through my gear last weekend I found an old backpack I almost forgot I still had.

It is an 1980's era Vaude Profile made in West Germany, I'm not sure of the size probably around 3600 cu. in.

I am going on a dayhike this next Saturday and decided to use this pack as it is in excellent shape and the suspension system fits me really well.

Here is a photo of one I found online:

 


!CDWrWkQBmk~$(KGrHqYOKnEEz2p9dSHKBNOPl23
This one sold on E-bay for 29.00, someone got a real good deal.

10:42 p.m. on February 9, 2011 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
19 forum posts

TSAR:I think ultra-light ,actually goes with the whole society , light is also associated with speed. Many who do hike ,don't feel they have hiked unless they commit, to so many miles. It can represent a challenge and also a way to gauge yourself. They idea of fast and light , goes with the world in which we live. I myself, like solitude and the feeling of not being on such a strict schedule. I plan time to sit, swim etc. so I do enjoy where I am as much as I can. I'm not saying one is better,  just different.

D&G  , yes it has,but there are some old standbys that have been around forever. From stoves to water filters, there are some that have stayed the same for years. Why" because they have proven their worth and no amount of grams is worth the night your stove doesn't work our you can't purify your water etc. (now I have a alternative back up for each) but then again that's not in the ultra light manual :) They are there if you look and rely on some comments from those who have ben around awhile.

8:50 a.m. on February 10, 2011 (EST)
15 reviewer rep
40 forum posts

Understood and I agree Ghetto.

1:13 p.m. on February 10, 2011 (EST)
171 reviewer rep
223 forum posts

But I like's to go fast!! ;-)

8:34 a.m. on February 11, 2011 (EST)
15 reviewer rep
40 forum posts

Then run man run :)

12:12 p.m. on February 11, 2011 (EST)
200 reviewer rep
4,136 forum posts

Ghetto Hiker says:Many who do hike ,don't feel they have hiked unless they commit, to so many miles

This is very true, for me anyways. I like multiday/week hikes. The more miles the better. I like canyon hiking now, places like the Paria/Buckskin. I have a goal in a year to hike up the Paria from Lee's Ferry on the Colorado to Tropic near Bryce. A distance of about 75 miles, then going over to the Escalante and spending the summer hiking and exploring it and its side canyons from the town of Escalante to Lake Powell.

But I have never done a long hike like the AT,PCT or the CDT. My longest hike was 256 miles in the Grand Canyon over 28 days. I also do bicycle tours and avergae 1000 miles a trip. My longest was 7000 miles around the USA.

8:59 p.m. on February 11, 2011 (EST)
308 reviewer rep
56 forum posts

I'm jealous Gary. I'm still saving up for a point where I can not be working long enough to do a serious trip like that!

My brother and I are saving for a month in Patagonia for 2012-2013. But before then,, I need to start doing some planning for this Spring / Summer though

10:02 p.m. on February 19, 2011 (EST)
0 reviewer rep
19 forum posts

Just noticed that under my name it states I'm a "junior member" .. usually I'm the Old Fart in the crowd. It's nice being among a group that are more "senior " than me !

11:43 p.m. on April 26, 2011 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
1,238 forum posts

Dunno (?).

Fabiano boots -- ca 1978

Kelty ext-frame b'pk -- ca 1978

I started back in the early 1960s ... but, mostly used borrowed (v primitive) gear.  First did some of the AT in 1962.   I may have something from that era, but I wouldn't know where to look for it.

I still have an old Filson jacket,  and an old Barbour waxed-cotton coat ... from the late '60s, I think.  A pair of heavy wool trousers by Filson.  Leather boots by RedWing (amazing quality).

My first 'backpack' was a leather and canvas rucksack  (and also a briefcase)  by some famous English company, "Ghurka".   Very high $$$, but I still have it and the briefcase, which I use now, and they are  still in good shape.   Might have been from the J. Peterman catalog.   Anyone remember them?   I also got a bullwhip from Peterman.  Still have it.   Was waaaay before 'Indiana Jones'.   Check-out my hat in my avatar pic.   That's from waaay before Indiana Jones or Crocodile Dundee, also.   Still serviceable.

Back then ( late '60s), I was a kid ... and used to go to the original Abercrombie & Fitch store in Manhattan (NYC).  I lived nearby.   This was THE finest / best'est place on the whole planet to buy outdoor gear.   Ernest Hemingway used to get his stuff there, for his Africa safaris.  Also, Robert Stack and Clark Gable.  Edmund Hillary.  Ted Williams.  I think (?) Teddy Roosevelt got gear there.    Now, some conglomerate bought the name, and there are A & F stores in almost every mall.   Not the same ... trust me.  Anyhow, it was a fantastic and amazing store.  

* sigh * ... The 'good 'ole days' ....

Yogi Robt

6:14 p.m. on April 28, 2011 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
1,238 forum posts

Went perusing my 'stash' ....

Found my old (1980s) 'FILA' rain-shell /  hooded-jacket.  Hi-Vis Yellow with blue trim.

Pre GoreTex.   Has fairly stout denier Nylon outter, with KEVLAR (!!!) -- the ballistic Nylon, shoulder and arm patches.    Venting zips EVERYWHERE.  Still pretty muggy inside, despite the mesh liner.

This thing is literally 'bullet-proof'.   I've hiked, backpacked, skied, climbed, jogged, worked, sailed in it.   One of my finest 'bargains', judging by utilitarian value.

Yogi Robt

12:22 a.m. on April 29, 2011 (EDT)
447 reviewer rep
277 forum posts

My Silva Ranger CL compass is the oldest - 1978. When I first got it I thought I'd never use the clinometer. Now that I'm an Alpine Ski Patroller in an avalanche prone area and do backcountry skiing I use it to measure slope angle.

Next oldest is my Dana Designs Terraplane and Wet Rib. I use the huge Terraplane for winter camping only now but the Wet Rib front pouch/bottle holder goes on all my packs, especially my lightweight summer backpack.

My question is "WHO would want things like a SVEA 123 stove with companion SIGG Tourist cook kit when I go to that Long Trail in the sky?"

Should I begin selling off items I no longer use but have great memories attatched to them? (I know, as a Buddhist I should not have attatchments to material things but there you are anyhow.)

1:56 a.m. on April 29, 2011 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
391 forum posts

1988 Vasque Sundowner boots

1989 Columbia anorak (might be my favorite piece of clothing I've ever owned and have started buying backups every time I see them)

197X Cashmere turtleneck sweater

2:38 p.m. on April 29, 2011 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
93 forum posts

I am one of those surviving from the late Pleistocene I think.

I recently (last year) have taken my vintage Kelty BB5 from 1972 along with my 71-72  4 times resoled Limmers on a nice backpack up in the Lemah Peaks area here in WA State. The age winner that trip was my keroburner Primus 96 kit dating from around 1917. We took a backup MSR Pocket Rocket in case but the Primus performed flawlessly.

On the trip where we climbed Mt Davis shown in the picture to the left with Banner and Ritter in the back ground, I took my old Optimus 80 from the 70's  and my Sigg Tourist cook kit of the same vintage. Not a bit of trouble.

Incidentally, the heat transfer on just about any aluminum pot is way much better than any of the titanium pots I've tried.

6:06 p.m. on April 29, 2011 (EDT)
245 reviewer rep
1,469 forum posts

Leatherman Wave 20 yr Anniversary model

9:10 p.m. on April 29, 2011 (EDT)
15 reviewer rep
40 forum posts

I think it is great to see all these 'old and not so modern' pieces still being used, working and appreciated.

 

Mazama-where was that 1917 keroburner made?

9:23 p.m. on April 29, 2011 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
1,238 forum posts

Incidentally, the heat transfer on just about any aluminum pot is way much better than any of the titanium pots I've tried.   

I have experienced the same.

Yogi Robt

 

11:24 p.m. on April 29, 2011 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
93 forum posts

I think it is great to see all these 'old and not so modern' pieces still being used, working and appreciated.

 

Mazama-where was that 1917 keroburner made?

 It was made in Sweden.

I actually am over my cabin this weekend and went through some of the stove collection I keep here and am pulling out a slightly newer Primus 96, a Radius 20 and the Radius 2 which is a version like the Optimus 00 or Primus 210 to take back and run sometime this spring on an outing.

All these were made in Sweden. Primus has the well known name but the Radius stoves are really quite fine and some of my favorites.

Over here at the cabin we can lose power for extended periods in winter so I keep a Big Radius 17 and a big BlueFlam burner to cook with and heat wash water when that happens. Of course with woodburning stoves ...heat is not a problem,  even at -10.

That said most of the snow is gone, at least on the south aspects, and the Spring Beauty's are popping up everywhere. Sitting in front of the big Jotul right now

11:43 p.m. on April 29, 2011 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
93 forum posts

Incidentally, the heat transfer on just about any aluminum pot is way much better than any of the titanium pots I've tried.   

I have experienced the same.

Yogi Robt

 

 I and another techno type friend Walt (a Boeing engineer) actually did the temperature jump test (time to 190 degrees) at a Sierra high camp trailhead with equal weights of the same temperature water in a stainless clad aluminum base Sigg pot vs a fancy lightweight Ti pot while trying to figure out how much fuel we needed. After we did the test, we looked at each other...tossed the Ti pans in the car and took the stainless clad Al base Sigg pots and then cut our fuel in half while having chow much sooner than a couple of other friends on the trip with the Ti pots

Worked perfect. We decided that the Ti is good for eating out of (microscopic reverse of heat in means it loses heat slower out as well) and that's about it.

5:34 a.m. on April 30, 2011 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
1,238 forum posts

 I and another techno type friend Walt (a Boeing engineer) actually did the temperature jump test (time to 190 degrees) at a Sierra high camp trailhead with equal weights of the same temperature water in a stainless clad aluminum base Sigg pot vs a fancy lightweight Ti pot while trying to figure out how much fuel we needed. After we did the test, we looked at each other...tossed the Ti pans in the car and took the stainless clad Al base Sigg pots and then cut our fuel in half while having chow much sooner than a couple of other friends on the trip with the Ti pots

Worked perfect. We decided that the Ti is good for eating out of (microscopic reverse of heat in means it loses heat slower out as well) and that's about it.

 

What about copper ... or copper-clad ?  (Like 'Revere-Ware', that has a copper bottom).

I have a large solid copper skillet, tin-lined  ( I think ?) cooking surface, brass handle,  that I use in my kitchen at home.  (Don't ask how much it cost).  It is commercial-grade.

That thing is 'the bomb' for all kinds of cooking.   Amazingly even heat distribution, and super-fast transfer.  Worth every penny.

Yogi Robt

10:53 a.m. on April 30, 2011 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
93 forum posts

Agree with Robert on copper heat transfer. I don't recall if the coefficient is similar to aluminum or not though. Will have to look into it when I get to the lab.

August 30, 2014
Quick Reply

Please sign in to reply

 
More Topics
This forum: Older: Anyone using 2-way radios ? Newer: External Frame Packs
All forums: Older: Tornado while backpacking...what to do? Newer: Talk to me about shelters...