Ahhh...the fresh smell of coffee.

11:31 a.m. on April 9, 2011 (EDT)
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Well since when backpacking you don't find any Starbucks, then the only thing left is to devise a way to make it on the trail.  I found this one lately and gotta say that it looks cool.


GSI-Java-Drip.jpg

Its the GSI Java Drip

There's nothing better than coffee on the trail, especially on a cold morning.  This company also makes a 50 ounce version.  So has anyone tried it?

If not...what do you use?

Snakey

12:22 p.m. on April 9, 2011 (EDT)
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That method of brewing coffee, is called the "pour-over" method, and the the best way to make coffee.  Period.  At home, on the trail, anywhere.

 

The most 'anal' coffee-snobs and baristas feel the same way.   It's the easiest, the simplest, and the best.

 

Wikepedia or google or eBay " Chemex ", Hario (a Japanese company), and COAVA (out of Oregon, I think).

All you have to do is put ground (fresh is best) coffee in a filter (check out that COAVA I mentioned) that goes in first, in the cone-shaped container (like what you're looking at) ... then pour boiled water over it.   Voila!


 Simple, 'eh?

 

I use a couple of these at home.  Two different sizes.   The come in plastic (colors, too) and ceramic.   Easy to tote along.

 

r2

 

 

2:32 p.m. on April 9, 2011 (EDT)
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What about something a lot more simple, lighter and more compact.

Oh yeah and its' still StarBucks to suit your taste preference.

 

starbucks-via-packets-popover.jpg

Add cup and hot water, instantly your done.  Imagine how many satchels you could store in the cup compared to coffee grounds.

 

Oh yeah,,,,,   AND YOU ARE CAMPING .

6:03 p.m. on April 9, 2011 (EDT)
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A good thread topic snakey!

I use a tall mug with a coffee filter attached to the top with a rubber band, add coffee, and pour water over. The trick is to remove the coffee filter & grounds without getting any in your mug.  I have even roasted and ground my own beans in the woods before, but I just carry ground coffee most of the time.

I used to carry a coffee press, but in my quest for a lighter, smaller, pack it was cut from the herd. I do use it for car camping though if I don't bring my percolator.

You can also make coffee bags, like tea bags, and brew that way as well.

6:22 p.m. on April 9, 2011 (EDT)
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I use the tea bag method. I too have a coffee press. But now only use it at home or car camping.

Talking about roasting your own. Takes alot of fuel, but the smell will drive others crazy. Lots of fun, but reserved for car camping. But talk about a fresh dark roast. One just cant beat it... Sorry Starbucks you are second hand news.

8:18 p.m. on April 9, 2011 (EDT)
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DSC03563.jpg

Here's what I've been useing over the years.  The bottom one is a plastic ring w/ very small mesh nylon. put coffe in , pour water, pull and dump filter. weighs just a couple of grams.  The smaller Vandel (left)(same thing as the primula, but smaller) is great for day trips. Larger one's for car camping.  I used to have a real gold filter (similar to the light weight filter in front) that was suppose to make the coffee taste better.  Don't remeber if it made it taste any better but it was a great filter.  Old school, but tried and true.

9:18 p.m. on April 9, 2011 (EDT)
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Sorry to disappoint you fellas who make coffee with paper filters. The filters remove most if not all of the oils of the coffee bean reducing the flavor. A stainless steel filter will eliminates the problem. Callahan has the simplest low volume and weight solution relative to comments and pictures of products shown above that you might consider for hiking. Freeze-dried coffee is the simplest. Place heated water over the crystals, add sweetener and/or "creamer/milk" product or what ever else lights your inner sanctum.

11:55 p.m. on April 9, 2011 (EDT)
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Sorry to disappoint you fellas who make coffee with paper filters. The filters remove most if not all of the oils of the coffee bean reducing the flavor. A stainless steel filter will eliminates the problem. Callahan has the simplest low volume and weight solution relative to comments and pictures of products shown above that you might consider for hiking. Freeze-dried coffee is the simplest. Place heated water over the crystals, add sweetener and/or "creamer/milk" product or what ever else lights your inner sanctum.

 

 

That's why I mentioned the KOAVA in my post.   Research it.  It's a stainless-steel for .... $50 !!!

 

Via (the Starbucks brand instant) is not bad.   Not great, either.

 

 

 

r2

3:21 p.m. on April 10, 2011 (EDT)
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I use the MSR mugmate and it work great for me!
IMG_0364.jpg

Nice and strong, gives a real kick :)

10:22 p.m. on April 10, 2011 (EDT)
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Sorry to disappoint you fellas who make coffee with paper filters. The filters remove most if not all of the oils of the coffee bean reducing the flavor. A stainless steel filter will eliminates the problem. Callahan has the simplest low volume and weight solution relative to comments and pictures of products shown above that you might consider for hiking. Freeze-dried coffee is the simplest. Place heated water over the crystals, add sweetener and/or "creamer/milk" product or what ever else lights your inner sanctum.

Yes you are right, but if you re-use the filter several times like I do, the filter looses it's absorbency after a couple uses. (At least that's what I tell myself)

I did have a stainless filter I bought from a specialty shop for a few dollars, it sat on top of the mug with a little handle. It worked fine, but I quit using it just because I found packing a couple paper filters was so much easier and saved space.

You know though, every couple years I tend to change my priorities a little, I will start using something again, or start doing something differently.

I think I will take both next time and do a taste test, after I have used the paper filter a few times, of course.

11:12 p.m. on April 10, 2011 (EDT)
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Sorry to disappoint you fellas who make coffee with paper filters. The filters remove most if not all of the oils of the coffee bean reducing the flavor. A stainless steel filter will eliminates the problem. Callahan has the simplest low volume and weight solution relative to comments and pictures of products shown above that you might consider for hiking. Freeze-dried coffee is the simplest. Place heated water over the crystals, add sweetener and/or "creamer/milk" product or what ever else lights your inner sanctum.

 Any pic of the Callahan?  I am not familiar with that one.

7:52 a.m. on April 11, 2011 (EDT)
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Sorry to disappoint you fellas who make coffee with paper filters. The filters remove most if not all of the oils of the coffee bean reducing the flavor. A stainless steel filter will eliminates the problem. Callahan has the simplest low volume and weight solution relative to comments and pictures of products shown above that you might consider for hiking. Freeze-dried coffee is the simplest. Place heated water over the crystals, add sweetener and/or "creamer/milk" product or what ever else lights your inner sanctum.

Yes you are right, but if you re-use the filter several times like I do, the filter looses it's absorbency after a couple uses. (At least that's what I tell myself)

I did have a stainless filter I bought from a specialty shop for a few dollars, it sat on top of the mug with a little handle. It worked fine, but I quit using it just because I found packing a couple paper filters was so much easier and saved space.

You know though, every couple years I tend to change my priorities a little, I will start using something again, or start doing something differently.

I think I will take both next time and do a taste test, after I have used the paper filter a few times, of course.

 

 

X2.   I do the same thing.

 

Here's how to alleviate your possible concerns with the filters leaching the essential oils from the fresh coffee:

 

Simply wet (pre-moisten) the filters before using.  Best to pour water through them or soak them, IF you have enough water available.

 

As H. Ross Perot would say, "PROBLEM SOLVED!"

 

Another solution, as an alternative to either paper or stainless-steel for filtering, is a unique, re-usable FLANNEL filter.  It is cone-shaped, and has a stitched-seam around the upper part, forming a looped-section that enables the filter to be fed into a wire-rimmed holder.   Kind-of like a miniature colander.  VERY small to pack, and VERY light.  It should never be left to dry, without rinsing the grounds residue out.   Can be re-used many times.   I got mine at a Williams-Sonoma store.   I believe (?) they are distributed / made by the Japanese "HARIO" company, I referenced in an earlier post here

 

r2

10:06 a.m. on April 11, 2011 (EDT)
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In the wilds I use coffee that brews in little teabags.  It tastes ok.  I look at coffee on the trail as fuel rather than gourmet dining. 

Drawback: have to burn or carry the used bags home.  Scattering coffee grounds in the bushes might attract the wrong kinds of wildlife.  By "wrong kind" I mean other hikers/climbers who forgot to bring coffee. 

10:24 a.m. on April 11, 2011 (EDT)
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Robert Rowe, thanks for the heads up on the flannel filter, I hadn't heard of that before. I have used my bandanna as a filter a few times, so i can see why a flannel filter would work.

SagetoSnow, that's funny!

12:40 p.m. on April 11, 2011 (EDT)
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  Hey, Y'all ...

 

Just found something on eBay, that will catch your attention.

It is a silicone, collapsible version of the dripper the OP shows in his post.  Just what we really could use.  It's the same material and principle as those collapsible mugs and bowls many of us use (sorry, can't recall the mfg).

On eBay, do a search for the seller, caffesospeso.   Click-on / look under all "items for sale" or presently on active auction.

They are $15.95 + s/h.  Reasonably expensive (?), but very, very packable and versatile.

 

 

r2

2:16 p.m. on April 11, 2011 (EDT)
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I stay away from coffee as much as possible on my adventures, as I've always placed a priority on hydration in the backcountry. The more I'm hydrated, the better I rest, sleep, think, etc. Caffeine doesn't help in that department. That being said, I won't pass up a nice cup-o-joe at work in the mornings.

2:20 p.m. on April 11, 2011 (EDT)
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That GSI java drip is a great looking design, however. Might use it if I'm car camping (rarely done).

3:03 p.m. on April 11, 2011 (EDT)
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I use the MSR mugmate and it work great for me!

Nice and strong, gives a real kick :)

I use the Finum Brewing Basket, it's the same as the mugmate but less expensive:  http://www.trailspace.com/gear/finum/brewing-basket/

Light, inexpensive and makes good coffee.

8:35 p.m. on April 12, 2011 (EDT)
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If not out on the trail, the true best cup of coffee is obtained via an espresso machine. Why?: The temp. is within the range of 192 to about 198 degrees fahrenheit. Below 192 degrees F, the coffee would taste flat. Above 198 degrees F, the organics are burned and the coffee tastes burned. Additionally, the heated water at a pressure of a minimum 135 psi,(pounds per square inch) is driven through the coffee to extract additional flavor. Cup temperature is usually around 135 degrees F. To date, there is no better way to make a quality tasting coffee. On the trail, if volume and weight are concerns than freeze dried coffee is the way to go. Starbuck's Via is fine, but you may be turned-off by the cost when buying it in quantity. Most supermarket brand coffees taste poor. I prefer Trader Joe's, Columbian freeze dried coffee. I've experimented with Aribica and numerous other quality coffees from a number of sources here and abroad and found them wanting. Aribica coffee is claimed to be the best tasting coffee in the world. After coffee is ground, it should be refrigerated and used within a week to obtain the best flavor.

9:00 p.m. on April 12, 2011 (EDT)
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My favorite type is Arabica, at home we brew Eight O'Clock brand from whole bean.

I had thought that all Columbian coffee was actually Arabica.

8:15 a.m. on April 13, 2011 (EDT)
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From above two posts ... I like Eight 0'Clock (is always rated highly in Consumer Reports tests) .... Trader Joe's (I was there yesterday buying coffee ... and always, their bananas at 19 cents apiece, which is like 45 cents per pound).   The Starbuck's Via is about a buck-a-cup.   Waaay too expensive for me.   I hit "pay-dirt" at my local Starbuck's; for some unknown reason their register is programmed to charge 50-cents for a 're-fill' (!!!).   I usually have my travel-mug with me, anyhow.

 

 

 

r2

9:27 a.m. on April 13, 2011 (EDT)
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My favorite coffee is Millstone Bed and Breakfast Blend, and I like Seattle's Best too, and the new rating they do means that Level Three is my favorite.  I like the talk about using paper and the oils being removed, so I think a metal filter is on my list. 

I just got a sample of instant coffee in the mail and now I know why I can't drink that stuff...yech.  Speaking of taste...I will not use an aluminum pot (or pan for that matter) as it ads a taste to the coffee.  I don't know about Titanium but aluminum is not one I will use.  I always thought that aluminum leaked dangerous toxins into the food or water.

Cowboy coffee can be the best coffee!  I think that is what I will start doing again, and just use the stainless steel filter screen to strain out the grounds.  Of course, the lightest way to get your coffee buzz is to put a pinch between your cheek and gums. 

 

Sankey

10:36 a.m. on April 13, 2011 (EDT)
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My favorite coffee is Millstone Bed and Breakfast Blend, and I like Seattle's Best too, and the new rating they do means that Level Three is my favorite.  I like the talk about using paper and the oils being removed, so I think a metal filter is on my list. 

I just got a sample of instant coffee in the mail and now I know why I can't drink that stuff...yech.  Speaking of taste...I will not use an aluminum pot (or pan for that matter) as it ads a taste to the coffee.  I don't know about Titanium but aluminum is not one I will use.  I always thought that aluminum leaked dangerous toxins into the food or water.

Cowboy coffee can be the best coffee!  I think that is what I will start doing again, and just use the stainless steel filter screen to strain out the grounds.  Of course, the lightest way to get your coffee buzz is to put a pinch between your cheek and gums. 

 

Sankey

 

 

BTW -- You spelled your sig incorrectly.

 

re:  Your concerns about using aluminum ....

Probably only need to worry if you fry a lot, using aluminum skillet.   The amount of aluminum leeching into food or water is almost immeasurable. 

You get more aluminum into your system from drinking directly from aluminum cans (soda, beer, etc.).

 

Statistic to ponder:   Ten-out-of-ten people die.

 

Are you ready ?

 

r2

12:21 p.m. on April 13, 2011 (EDT)
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Yes, the Trader Joes' two versions of insant freeze-dried coffees are GREAT!  I actually like the cheaper of the two Columbian style taste better.  Both rank up there (or better) than Via!

11:04 p.m. on April 13, 2011 (EDT)
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Trouthunter and others: I've verified the Trader Joe's Columbian coffee. It does not specify it as an Aribica. I have an Aribica from the UK sold in France. It doesn't specify that it's Columbian. If at home, you might consider heating your water in a Pyrex, (glass) pot. You'll be able to see it develop it's temp. rise by the bubbles. Glass has no noticeable taste affect. Titanium has no noticeable taste affect as well. I've learned that it's best to put freeze-dried coffee in the cup and then pour the heated water in versus putting the coffee into a cup of heated water. The difference in taste is clearly discernible. I frequently habit Border's book store which has a Seattle's Best cafe'. I prefer Starbuck's coffee. Perhaps it's personal. The French have a saying which I'll simply translate: "To each his own."

2:27 a.m. on April 14, 2011 (EDT)
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My favorite coffee is Millstone Bed and Breakfast Blend, and I like Seattle's Best too, and the new rating they do means that Level Three is my favorite.  I like the talk about using paper and the oils being removed, so I think a metal filter is on my list. 

I just got a sample of instant coffee in the mail and now I know why I can't drink that stuff...yech.  Speaking of taste...I will not use an aluminum pot (or pan for that matter) as it ads a taste to the coffee.  I don't know about Titanium but aluminum is not one I will use.  I always thought that aluminum leaked dangerous toxins into the food or water.

Cowboy coffee can be the best coffee!  I think that is what I will start doing again, and just use the stainless steel filter screen to strain out the grounds.  Of course, the lightest way to get your coffee buzz is to put a pinch between your cheek and gums. 

 

Sankey

 

 

BTW -- You spelled your sig incorrectly.

 

re:  Your concerns about using aluminum ....

Probably only need to worry if you fry a lot, using aluminum skillet.   The amount of aluminum leeching into food or water is almost immeasurable. 

You get more aluminum into your system from drinking directly from aluminum cans (soda, beer, etc.).

 

Statistic to ponder:   Ten-out-of-ten people die.

 

Are you ready ?

 

r2

Snakey...there...fixed.    If you saw my hands you would see ten thumbs.

 

5:00 a.m. on April 14, 2011 (EDT)
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If you saw my hands you would see ten thumbs. 

Is that before or after my cocktail hour?  Consider yourself lucky.  A South Pacific friend of mine is a pianist in their leper colony; she got the job not because of her musicianship; rather because she was the one with the most fingers.  If you know someone who wouldn’t fear the audience, they are looking to replace her.  Apparently they have grown tired of Chopsticks.

Ed

6:05 a.m. on April 14, 2011 (EDT)
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If you saw my hands you would see ten thumbs. 

Is that before or after my cocktail hour?  Consider yourself lucky.  A South Pacific friend of mine is a pianist in their leper colony; she got the job not because of her musicianship; rather because she was the one with the most fingers.  If you know someone who wouldn’t fear the audience, they are looking to replace her.  Apparently they have grown tired of Chopsticks.

Ed

 

 

 

 ( insert laughing smilie icon )

 

 

r2

6:53 p.m. on April 14, 2011 (EDT)
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I have one of the MSR "rim of mug" mounted units that you put the grounds in and then pour the hot water through and it ends up in the mug, called the "Mug-mate".  It turns out a pretty good cup o' joe.  I typically use fresh ground beans from....Dunkin' Donuts.  I really like the flavor of their Original roast.  I have yet to find one I like more.  However the Folgers Brazilian roast is also one of my favorites.

What do you all think of those new Starbucks packs of instant coffee?

11:05 p.m. on April 15, 2011 (EDT)
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Regarding aluminum: Acidic foods such as tomato sauce left in/on your cooking/eating ware and eaten subsequently, probably the following day, could be severely dangerous to your life. A woman in Germany nearly died in the wilderness due to the above. She was rescued in time, hospitalized and survived. D&G in the Smokys: If you have a chance, read through previous posts above regarding the Starbuck's packs of instant coffee. I found it to be a quality, bold and flavorful coffee.

12:18 a.m. on April 16, 2011 (EDT)
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It is a silicone, collapsible version of the dripper the OP shows in his post.  Just what we really could use. 

We got one of these at REI. It's great because it "flips" out with a flick of the wrist, but a little heavier than the standard plastic model.

That's for my wife, who prefers drip filters. I have switched to strong black tea, but in my hard-core coffee days I always preferred "cowboy coffee" with the grounds right in the pot or cup. Do it right and they sink to the bottom every time, same flavor as a French press, I totally agree about losing flavor and body in paper filters.


Dripper.gif

8:10 a.m. on April 16, 2011 (EDT)
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i am with you on this one bigred. cowboy coffee done right is just as good as drip. and you don't need the cone or filters. if you heat a small ammount of water and coffee almost to a boil then add cold water most of the grounds will sink. after adding the cold water i heat the coffee to my preferred drinking temperature.

i was taught to reuse the old grounds and add a pinch of new to every new pot. sure makes the coffee last longer that way. just make sure you never boil it. after about 6 pots i do empty the old grounds and start over.

the old cowboy who taught me this method would never wash his coffee pot either. he would only rinse it out. after he got married one of the first things his new wife did was to wash his old coffee pot with soap and hot water. she only did that once. after she did it the old coffee pot started leaking and they had to buy a new one. he never let her forget it either. 

these days i mostly drink yerba mate tea and prepare it the same way as cowboy coffee.

bigred thanks for the help with the wooden skis. my computer died since we last communicated and i have just recently gotten a new one. i will send you some pixs soon. 

11:28 a.m. on April 16, 2011 (EDT)
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We all know that coffee keeps us awake, and although this is a little off-topic, but since we are talking about cowboys anyway I thought I tell you how the cowboys stayed awake.  Other than coffee, which they simply could not stop and make whenever they wanted.  On the many cattle drives that helped feed this growing country, the cowpokes would have take turns watching the cattle at night.  If you fell asleep while doing so you would be in trouble.  Not just because you were sleeping, but because you would get a whipping or worse by the trail boss.  So, needless to say, you had to stay awake.  The cowboys developed a method that was foolproof.  They would take a pinch of chewing tobacco and put it under their eyelids.  Think about that the next time you are yawning and slugging down a cup of coffee. 

 

:)

Snakey  (Did not use my thumbs)

4:05 a.m. on April 17, 2011 (EDT)
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..how the cowboys stayed awake...  ..They would take a pinch of chewing tobacco and put it under their eyelids...

Hmmm...  They must be the same cowboys that told me they smear fresh steer manure on their lips to prevent sunburn and chapping.

Ed

7:24 a.m. on April 17, 2011 (EDT)
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..how the cowboys stayed awake...  ..They would take a pinch of chewing tobacco and put it under their eyelids...

Hmmm...  They must be the same cowboys that told me they smear fresh steer manure on their lips to prevent sunburn and chapping.

Ed

 

 

I hear sheep-herders (sheperds) have other ways of staying awake.

 

 

 

 

Yogi Robert

12:18 p.m. on April 17, 2011 (EDT)
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..how the cowboys stayed awake...  ..They would take a pinch of chewing tobacco and put it under their eyelids...

Hmmm...  They must be the same cowboys that told me they smear fresh steer manure on their lips to prevent sunburn and chapping.

Ed

That must have tasted like crap.  LOL

12:22 p.m. on April 17, 2011 (EDT)
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Have any of you ever heard of adding an egg to coffee to reduce bitterness?  My Mom used to do that all the time, breaking a raw egg into the drip percolator.  (Easy with the snappy answers now...this is my mom.)  It was a mess in the basket but she used to get major compliments on her coffee though.  Now I would not carry an egg with me on the trail, but I was curious if any of you have heard of this.  

 

3:16 p.m. on April 17, 2011 (EDT)
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Have any of you ever heard of adding an egg to coffee to reduce bitterness?  My Mom used to do that all the time, breaking a raw egg into the drip percolator.  (Easy with the snappy answers now...this is my mom.)  It was a mess in the basket but she used to get major compliments on her coffee though.  Now I would not carry an egg with me on the trail, but I was curious if any of you have heard of this.  

 

That's a new one on me, but there's a lot I don't know.

I have eaten Red Eye Gravy which I think (?) was made with coffee grounds.

6:37 p.m. on April 17, 2011 (EDT)
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Have any of you ever heard of adding an egg to coffee to reduce bitterness?  My Mom used to do that all the time, breaking a raw egg into the drip percolator.  (Easy with the snappy answers now...this is my mom.)  It was a mess in the basket but she used to get major compliments on her coffee though.  Now I would not carry an egg with me on the trail, but I was curious if any of you have heard of this.  

 YES.   Only with egg-shells.

7:45 p.m. on April 17, 2011 (EDT)
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My favorite coffee is Ben and Jerry's Coffee Heath Bar Crunch. It's the smoothest, creamiest, richest coffee I've ever tasted. Best served sans hot water...

7:54 p.m. on April 17, 2011 (EDT)
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yep egg shells and a dash of salt

10:11 p.m. on April 17, 2011 (EDT)
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I use a pinch of salt, but for the most part I like my java strong.  I have tried the Via Italian roast, but I have to use 2 packs for my 450 mug and it still tastes weak. 

11:02 p.m. on April 17, 2011 (EDT)
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That must have tasted like crap.  LOL

Are you a coprophagiac  ??


Yogi Robt

12:22 a.m. on April 18, 2011 (EDT)
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I LOVE coffee!  I love nothing better than a hot cuppa joe with breakfast.  That being said, when I am backpacking--I want as little on my back as I have to!

For years, I carried a Melita with pre-measured/premade filters filled with the right about of grounds per day.  But I got tired of accidents and losing my coffee because of the tippiness of the top-heaviness.

I started using the Starbucks Via Italian roast, which was a tradeoff I was willing to make for the convenience. Now the best part is they finally have a French roast Via which is really quite good!

When I am home, I won't settle for anything but my French press, French roast coffee--when I am on the trail, I look forward to my instant Via with my doctored Kashi oatmeal in one of my favorite places on the planet--the great outdoors!

How much do you want to carry-- I say--Embrace the KISS principle--Keep It Simple S________!!! :) Enjoy the simplicity!

What about something a lot more simple, lighter and more compact.

Oh yeah and its' still StarBucks to suit your taste preference.

 

starbucks-via-packets-popover.jpg

Add cup and hot water, instantly your done.  Imagine how many satchels you could store in the cup compared to coffee grounds.

 

Oh yeah,,,,,   AND YOU ARE CAMPING .

10:46 a.m. on April 18, 2011 (EDT)
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I use a pinch of salt, but for the most part I like my java strong.  I have tried the Via Italian roast, but I have to use 2 packs for my 450 mug and it still tastes weak.

Yes...I'll second the motion.  Strong BLACKcoffee.  If there is one this I can't stand is weak coffee.  (I don't know about the salt, but can't try it as I need to watch the salt intake) I hate that when I go into a restaurant and they serve me brown flavored water. 

6:07 p.m. on April 18, 2011 (EDT)
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Re: strong coffee?

So, you want it strong?

I am a serious tea drinker.  For strong tea, try:

  • Scottish Breakfast (blend of black Assam, and another tea).  Peet's uses Lapsang Souchong
  • I love Lapsang Souchong strait!

Lapsang will make your hair stand up on end!  A very strong-powerful, smoky scent.
Love this in the morning!!!

6:41 p.m. on April 18, 2011 (EDT)
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Cal-ee-for-nia said:

"Lapsang will make your hair stand up on end!  A very strong-powerful, smoky scent.
Love this in the morning!!!"

I'll give that a try, my English friends have tried to convert me to tea. I have so far compromised by drinking Coffee for breakfast, and Tea at noon.

When I was younger I went with some friends camping in the woods close to home, we got into the woods late and we just walked around looking for a tent site.

We finally found a big, long, clearing perfect for tenting, no overhead limbs, and a big starry sky.

We woke up with our hair standing on end....you see, we had camped under some high tension power lines, we hadn't noticed them the night before in the dark. We didn't know what that low 'hum' was we heard while we went to sleep.

Those were the days, and we're lucky to have had more considering some of the things we did.

8:19 a.m. on April 19, 2011 (EDT)
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Re: strong coffee?

Lapsang will make your hair stand up on end!  A very strong-powerful, smoky scent.

__________________________________________________

That stuff tastes and smells like creosote, doesn't it?

Yogi Robt

10:17 a.m. on April 19, 2011 (EDT)
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The best coffee if you have the money is Jamaica Blue Mountain Coffee. It can run you $150.00+ for a 3 pound bag.

If you want to save a few bucks, and do some of the work, get the green beans. Most coffee you buy is stale coffee. If you roast your own beans the coffee won't be bitter. You won't even need milk or sugar.

Check out the JBMC coffee it will really shock you how good it is.

12:15 p.m. on April 19, 2011 (EDT)
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The best coffee if you have the money is Jamaica Blue Mountain Coffee. It can run you $150.00+ for a 3 pound bag.

If you want to save a few bucks, and do some of the work, get the green beans. Most coffee you buy is stale coffee. If you roast your own beans the coffee won't be bitter. You won't even need milk or sugar.

Check out the JBMC coffee it will really shock you how good it is.

_________________________________________________________

I have had it ... years ago.   Do not recall the cost, but it was not inexpensive.   Probably not worth $50 / lb, in any event.


Yogi Robt

12:29 p.m. on April 19, 2011 (EDT)
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Yes, Lapsang is STRONG!!!!!

But I feel that tea has such a wider range than coffee.  Be it:

  • Green= Nutty-to-grassy taste
  • Oolong= Smooth, mild, with fruity & floral notes
  • White (the most neutral in taste): light, delicate, slightly sweet flavor, not grassy.  Less caffeine & more nutrients that black or green teas.
  • Black: generally stronger in flavor and contains more caffeine than oolong, green, or white tea
  • Blends: Hugh range
  •   Black currant & other versions
  •   Earl Grey, a black tea with bergamot oil, orange-lemon-y
  •   Masala Chai; spices of cinnamon, ginger, cloves, etc..
  •   Your U.K. types; Irish, English, Scottish Breakfast teas
  •   Russian Caravan; full, smooth, slightly smoky.
1:31 p.m. on April 19, 2011 (EDT)
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Unless you are buying Jamaican Blue Mountain from an extremely reputable roaster or dealer, who is is experienced with rare coffees, it is likely that you won't be buying the real thing. The authentic article is grown specifically in the east of the island on the elevated slopes of the Blue mountains. Coffee grown at elevation on other mountain areas can only be accurately called Jamaican High Mountain. Those grown in the lower elevations and valleys are properly called Blue Mountain Valley. The true JBM berry yields coffee lower in acidity and more complex than either the JHM or BMV bean. Much of what is sold as JBM is actually one of the other two, or a blend of coffees, sometimes not even from Jamaica.

On the topic of Coffee in general, I have to admit that I have very high standards, and am a self-confessed coffee snob. I do however do my best to keep my snobbery to myself, and only share my thoughts and knowledge where is welcome. So just smack me if I get too excited or emphatic ;)

As others have mentioned certain metals and plastic can impart flavor, which is always undesirable. Both cloth and paper filters can also, though it is usually negligible. Any method that does not absorb oil during brewing is preferred. Both Paper and cloth will remove most of the precious oils from the final cupping. Reusing an absorbent filter will reduce the amount of oil removed, but it will always continue to remove a large percentage of the oil. This is because the oil is lighter than the water, and as we know oil and water reject each other. These two factors, along with surface tension, cause the oil to stay on top of the water as it drains through the filter, where it then clings to and remains on the saturated fabric. Espresso, French Press, Italian Pot, metal-screen drip, metal percolator, Turkish, and "Cowboy" coffee methods can all produce excellent results that do not remove much oil. Each produces different results, naturally.

Of course you can't make a silk purse out of a sow's ear, as the saying goes. Meaning, how you brew it won't much matter if you use crappy bean. Brewing as soon after roasting and immediately after grinding are very important. The oils immediately begin to break down after roasting, and degradation is accelerated many times once it is ground. The culprit is oxygen, so it is important to keep coffee sealed and stored in a cool (not cold) place. Leaving the finest Kona, Sidamo, or Blue Mountain sit for a month after grinding will reduce it to not much better than gas station swill

6:07 p.m. on April 19, 2011 (EDT)
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It's okay to be a 'little bit' snobby Gonzan, that just means you are discriminating, er, I mean you have a discriminating palate.

Coffee is definitely better brewed just after grinding!

So guess this means I need to quit using paper filters and go back to using a stainless screen huh?

I don't carry my coffee press anymore because it was not multi purpose, of course if it's single purpose is paramount it doesn't matter much does it?

Okay so which percolator would make the best coffee, stainless or aluminum? I have both and I'm guessing stainless, but it sure is heavier.

7:12 p.m. on April 19, 2011 (EDT)
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Yeah that is a good point gonzan if you buy the green beans you have to vacuum seal them with an oxygen pack to keep them for any length of time. You want to roast and grind them fresh.

The JBMB are expensive for the real thing and don't get fooled into buying them from Hawaii or something. It's hard to get imports from Jamaica here in the U.S.  Most of their exports go straight to England.  

1:43 a.m. on April 20, 2011 (EDT)
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I've heard you CAN buy your own beans (sorry, but I don't make enough money to be THAT snobbyat $150 a pound) and roast your beans in a hot air popper.

Had a friend who roasted his own beans for a local business, and he gave me that little tip.

But--when back packing do I need to drink the ultra fancy stuff?

Hmm. Maybe suppose I need to start drinking Kopi Luwak beans? :) Meow.

7:08 a.m. on April 20, 2011 (EDT)
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I've got news for all, here .....

Coffee "beans" are not really beans.   Technically, they are SEEDS.

Ponder on that, as you sip your java ....

Yogi Robt

11:00 a.m. on April 20, 2011 (EDT)
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I've heard you CAN buy your own beans (sorry, but I don't make enough money to be THAT snobbyat $150 a pound) and roast your beans in a hot air popper.

Had a friend who roasted his own beans for a local business, and he gave me that little tip.

But--when back packing do I need to drink the ultra fancy stuff?

Hmm. Maybe suppose I need to start drinking Kopi Luwak beans? :) Meow.

 

Hahaha! Don't get me wrong, I can't afford to buy only the best coffee all the time, though I splurge once a month to get a pound of something really good. For day-to-day brewing I get region specific coffees from Costco. So much for being a true coffee snob :)  Nor am I able to only brew with preferred methods all the time. At work all we are allowed to use is an ancient food-service drip maker, though a screen filter helps greatly. 

I am completely spoiled, though, as I have a friend who is a professional roaster, and he gets in the best green coffee from around the world. I haven't yet tried Luwak, though. LOL :)

Another friend roasts his own at home. Whether in a big rotation roaster or out of your own oven, there is nothing better than brewing it right after it comes out of the "flame"!

 -Trout, the stainless will definitely impart less metallic taste. The acid in coffee will chemically react with aluminium, especially if it is left very long. The by product of the reaction tastes bad and is not good for you.

-Robert, you are correct: the Coffee "bean" is the dicot seed found at the heart of the coffee berry (or cherry), which is bright red when ripe. It is not incorrect to refer to them as "beans," however, as it is a universally applied and standardized nomenclature.

 

12:04 p.m. on April 20, 2011 (EDT)
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The thin Starbuck's instant coffee packets work very well, have high-quality, authentic Starbuck's flavour, and most of the time, the coffee is indistinguishable from the ground from bean coffee I use at home.  I live in the Land of Coffee and Starbuck's, so I have tried all of these products, and you will not be disappointed in the coffee from the packets. They are easy to carry and lightweight--good stuff!  Enjoy!

12:30 p.m. on April 20, 2011 (EDT)
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At 150 bucks for coffee, I would swish it around in my mouth and gargle and then swallow.  (It there a proper way to drink the coffee by the way...you know like say wine, with all it's specific procedures.)  Of course after I did drink the expensive stuff I would become depressed that I spent that much money just drinking a cup of coffee.  Not to say that it is a bad thing to be a "coffee snob" as hey... I think Frasier (the TV show) was really cool.  I like people that get into stuff, learn everything they can about it.  After all....how would the rest of us learn if it were not for them.

Years ago when I first started drinking coffee, I became aware of the people that cared about putting out the best in everything.  You don't have to be rich either to be that type of person.  I remember one time when I was about 15 years old living the summer with my sister and her husband, who lived on site near this huge wrecking yard, a family run affair,  that my brother-in-law was part owner in.  He took me with him one day, taking the wrecker to someplace hundreds of miles away to pick up a junk car that the company had bought.  We left early on a cold morning, before sunrise and after a while as the sun started to rise my brother-in-law pulled over and asked me if I was hungry.  It was a clean but old truckers restaurant, and when I told the heavyset waitress that I wanted my eggs sunny side up with the yokes broken, she screamed to the cook, "Two eggs Arnie...ruin em."  But man...when that coffee came, it was well...the best tasting coffee.  I commented that to her when she returned and she said, "Honey...these here are hard working truckers and construction men, and they like a good breakfast.  But if the coffee tasted bad...well we would be out of business."  

Snakey

1:57 p.m. on April 20, 2011 (EDT)
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Re: Ahhh...the fresh coffee & tea

Both are best when fresh, not stale from "hanging around the shelf".

I attached a table I made for tea.  Wife and I carry this with us when we may "stop for a spot".
Tea-chart.png

7:31 p.m. on April 20, 2011 (EDT)
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YOU MEAN THEY ARE REALLY SEEDS?

You mean I can plant my own and quit buying them?

No wonder coffee companies want us to think they're beans.

Haha....I also think it's funny when I tell people that tomatoes are really a fruit. (my wife told me years ago...I didn't know either)

8:46 p.m. on April 20, 2011 (EDT)
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My former YF ... WAS a HOT TOMATO, at one time.

Later, I had to inform her she was "A FRUIT".

Yogi Robt

2:39 a.m. on April 21, 2011 (EDT)
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My former YF ... WAS a HOT TOMATO, at one time.

Later, I had to inform her she was "A FRUIT".

Yogi Robt

LOL...

8:52 a.m. on April 24, 2011 (EDT)
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Yesterday ...   upon your suggestion, D&G, I bought one of these MSR  "MugMates".   SEVENTEEN ($17) American freakin' dollars !

Haven't tried it yet.   If I deem it unsatisfactory, I'm gonna lambaste you !!

Yogi Robt

____________________________________________

I have one of the MSR "rim of mug" mounted units that you put the grounds in and then pour the hot water through and it ends up in the mug, called the "Mug-mate".  It turns out a pretty good cup o' joe.  I typically use fresh ground beans from....Dunkin' Donuts.  I really like the flavor of their Original roast.  I have yet to find one I like more.  However the Folgers Brazilian roast is also one of my favorites.

What do you all think of those new Starbucks packs of instant coffee?

12:48 p.m. on April 24, 2011 (EDT)
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I could not agree more with  Howard Hayden's comments on coffee made from the Starbuck's Via.

I took a couple of  the Via Italian Roast when I led a field trip group on a winter overnight snow bivouac a week ago.. and it made the 15 degree morning on Mt Rainier quite pleasant. Light snow and hot coffee! They weigh basically nothing compared to the French press system I used to use and are less trash to haul back out than even a 1/2 of a hot chocolate packet.

I'm considering taking some of these in my briefcase for when I travel outside of latteland on business.

10:18 a.m. on April 25, 2011 (EDT)
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UPDATE / Gear Alert:

I have now used the MSR "MugMate", in my kitchen at home.  I like it very much.   2 thumbs up !!

The initial reaction to the cost ($17) is now abated, somewhat.   I can amortize the cost, and see where it will be mitigated by not having to buy the cone-shaped Melitta (and Trader Joe's) paper filters..

Now, I'm thinking of getting another "MugMate".   One for permanent kitchen (home) duty ... the other in my backpacking gear, lest I forget to bring it along.

I usually have my large vintage Kelty pack semi-'ready to go'.   Can just grab it with short notice, and hit the trails.

Yogi Robt

4:23 p.m. on April 25, 2011 (EDT)
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Yesterday ...   upon your suggestion, D&G, I bought one of these MSR  "MugMates".   SEVENTEEN ($17) American freakin' dollars !

You obviously didn't see my post after that, same thing only less expensive:

Finum Brewing Basket, http://www.trailspace.com/gear/finum/brewing-basket/

You could have got two for the price of one mugmate. 

7:05 p.m. on April 25, 2011 (EDT)
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Yes ... I did see your post, barkndog.

I was at a nearby outdoor-gear supply store, and I was there to look at / buy a Patagonia down-sweater.

I sauntered over to the camping and cooking gear section of the store, when I spotted the MSR MugMate.  I flinched at the price.  I recalled your post, but could not remember the name of the Finum Brewing Basket.   I inquired of staff, but, of course they were pushing their stocked MSR item.

 So, I sorta bought it on impulse and curiosity.

Now that I am 'sold' on the item and the concept ... wanting to acquire another ... I have to ask you:  where did you find the Finum?

  Online, or at a tea / coffee / boutique store ?  I see they are $10 at amazon.com.

Yogi Robt

7:39 p.m. on April 25, 2011 (EDT)
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My partner uses "Cool Brew" a liquid that, when added to hot water makes, so I am told, a rich, acid-less coffee. Shudder.

I drink tea. A lot of tea.

derjoser

9:14 p.m. on April 25, 2011 (EDT)
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Welcome, derjoser ~~

Sorry to see you've had your medical problems.  

I can identify with 'issues' such as those, myself.   Bummer.

Four surgeries in the past 12-months ... I am now a cancer-survivor.

We look forward to your participation on these forums.   Will be cool for you to share your gear-knowledge with us.

Warm regards,

Yogi Robt

8:53 a.m. on April 26, 2011 (EDT)
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Now that I am 'sold' on the item and the concept ... wanting to acquire another ... I have to ask you:  where did you find the Finum?

  Online, or at a tea / coffee / boutique store ?  I see they are $10 at amazon.com.

Amazon, I got a twofer deal, right now they are two for 15.13 (according to my Amazon.com listing, Amazon uses pricing algorithms and may display you a different price...)

Finum Brewing Baskets

I can understand buying the MugMate if you were right there, no waiting for shipping.  In my opinion, I like brew baskets better than other methods when hiking/camping, they make a good cup of coffee, they're light and easy to clean.

10:10 a.m. on April 26, 2011 (EDT)
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I'm using this little sucker right now, here at home.  LOVE IT !  Very, very convenient.


Definitely gonna get another.   Could use here in the kitchen, when I brew for a guest ( G/F, etc. ).

Thanks for the reference !

Yogi Robt

Amazon, I got a twofer deal, right now they are two for 15.13 (according to my Amazon.com listing, Amazon uses pricing algorithms and may display you a different price...)

Finum Brewing Baskets

I can understand buying the MugMate if you were right there, no waiting for shipping.  In my opinion, I like brew baskets better than other methods when hiking/camping, they make a good cup of coffee, they're light and easy to clean.

9:20 a.m. on May 8, 2011 (EDT)
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I just saw a quote that David Letterman made, which I thought was rather humorous.

"If it weren't for the coffee, I'd have no identifiable personality whatsoever."
- David Letterman

I think that in his case it may be true...

12:12 a.m. on May 10, 2011 (EDT)
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My grand-dad has a cold ... and everytime he tries to COFFEE wets his pants. --   Jeff Foxworthy

7:36 a.m. on May 14, 2011 (EDT)
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Gotta tell 'Y'all (and esp 'Snakey' and 'barkndog') ... I'm verrry impressed with the MSR 'MugMate' ( similar to the Finum Brewing Basket ).

Using it right now, for my hot cup of 'half-caff'.

r2

8:54 a.m. on May 14, 2011 (EDT)
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Last time I used an individual brew basket on the trail I got dirty looks from my friends holding their empty mugs. I have found a device called H2joe, it is a stainless steel basket that will screw into a wide mouth water bottle. You are supposed to put coarse ground coffee into the basket, but I find it works better just putting the grounds right into the bottle, and then screwing the basket on. Pour in the boiling water, screw on the wide mouth bottle cap and let it sit for a bit. It will brew up to a liter, you can put it into a cozy for a second cup later, and it cleans up pretty easily. The nice thing for me is that the H2joe in the waterbottle stays out of the way and I can still use the bottle for hydration later. I keep a similar setup for pre filtering water for my steri-pen.

8:41 p.m. on May 14, 2011 (EDT)
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Hafford said:

Last time I used an individual brew basket on the trail I got dirty looks from my friends holding their empty mugs. I have found a device called H2joe, it is a stainless steel basket that will screw into a wide mouth water bottle. You are supposed to put coarse ground coffee into the basket, but I find it works better just putting the grounds right into the bottle, and then screwing the basket on. Pour in the boiling water, screw on the wide mouth bottle cap and let it sit for a bit. It will brew up to a liter, you can put it into a cozy for a second cup later, and it cleans up pretty easily. The nice thing for me is that the H2joe in the waterbottle stays out of the way and I can still use the bottle for hydration later. I keep a similar setup for pre filtering water for my steri-pen.

 

Interesting coincidence.

I just got an H2JOE today, along with another MSR 'MugMate'.   Gonna give the 'MugMate' to my former-'yf'.

I'm very impressed with these things.   Haven't used the new H2JOE yet.   Will do so soon.

Yogi Robt

8:01 a.m. on May 15, 2011 (EDT)
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"I usually have my large vintage Kelty pack semi-'ready to go'.   Can just grab it with short notice, and hit the trails.

Yogi Robt"

 

Yogi Robt,  I have a Large Vintage Kelty that is still unidentified. I posted pictures in this forum under Can you identify this.....but alas, no one has responded. Have you taken a look and do you know what it is?

 

Sorry about the off topic question. So..fyi..I just use generic freeze dried coffee on the trail. I need to leave my inner snob behind from time to time.

9:06 a.m. on May 15, 2011 (EDT)
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rocketmanw900 said:

"I usually have my large vintage Kelty pack semi-'ready to go'.   Can just grab it with short notice, and hit the trails.

Yogi Robt"

 

Yogi Robt,  I have a Large Vintage Kelty that is still unidentified. I posted pictures in this forum under Can you identify this.....but alas, no one has responded. Have you taken a look and do you know what it is?

 

Sorry about the off topic question. So..fyi..I just use generic freeze dried coffee on the trail. I need to leave my inner snob behind from time to time.

  Hi, rocketman900 ~~

Yes.  I believe I can help you ... or, more accurately, you can help yourself.

Go to a post I authored in this forum entitled, "Anyone Upgrade A Vintage Kelty External-Frame Backpack?".

It is a month-or-so old, with no recent posts, so you'll have to scroll down through the selections here at "Gear Selections".

Look for a post by lazya4.   He provides links to websites that will assist you in identifying your pack.

Yogi Robt

10:01 a.m. on May 15, 2011 (EDT)
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Yup, been there and looked at that post. Still not finding an exact match for this pack. Ah, the mystery. I guess I'll  get another cup and keep looking.

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