Nalgene Bottles

7:25 p.m. on April 28, 2011 (EDT)
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I've notice there are different type of materials of quart sized, wide mouth bottles.

Nalgene Polyethylene

Nalgene HDPE

Nalgene Tritan

Of the three, the only difference that I have noticed is the feel of the bottle, the price and the weight. Is one better than the other for some reason?

Thanks....

1:31 p.m. on April 29, 2011 (EDT)
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HDPE and polyethylene are the same thing.  it's softer, moderately rigid plastic, usually a cloudy/milky white.  perfectly safe, and quite durable for must uses - unless you drop it over a cliff.  has been around for at least a few decades.  it's not great for winter hiking; if water freezes inside, it can end up splitting the bottle open.  yes, i had that happen once.

Tritan is transparent, comes clear or in a variety of colors.  it is a harder and more durable material than polyethylene, less prone to breakage/splitting, and it weighs slightly more.  it's good year-round, and preferable for cold weather in particular because freezing and thawing won't really damage it.  for what it's worth, i have found that Tritan becomes somewhat less clear when exposed to sun block; all my tritan bottles have a dirty-looking film on the exterior as a result of trips to the beach and summer hikes.  purely cosmetic. 

for a long time, Nalgene and others made transparent plastic bottles out of a hard polycarbonate branded as Lexan.   they pretty much abandoned polycarbonate/Lexan when research began showing that a chemical, bisphenol-A (also known as BPA) could leach from that plastic into the water or other liquids in the bottles - and BPA was/is believed to be potentially carcinogenic.  Tritan was adopted as a replacement to polycarbonate. 

ps - nalgene is a fine brand; so is camelbak.  worth checking both out to see what you like better. 

6:04 p.m. on April 29, 2011 (EDT)
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Also a great storage location for the SteriPen water treatment kit.

10:30 p.m. on April 29, 2011 (EDT)
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Thanks for the info.

I have been using the tritan bottles for years now without breaking any. I have a few that have some black crud in them from not washing well.  I just picked up a few of the HDPE Nalgene bottles. I think I like the softer bottles a bit more. They had them in some neon colors which is nice. I also have a Camelbak better bottle with the hands free attachment which is nice. 

5:17 a.m. on April 30, 2011 (EDT)
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I have several Nalgene's ... some dating back decades.  Including the small ones for condiments, like vinegar and salad-dressing when I 'car-camp' out of my VW Westphalia Camper Vanagon (has a stove and sink).

I did have one shatter in the Winter, when dropped.   The plastic gets brittle.

I also like the assorted (incl neon) colors of the HDPE bottles.   Can more easily identify liquid beverages.   Water begins to taste a little 'funky' after about 3-4 days, though ... even though I wash and rinse with a little bleach after each outing .

I found the Camelbak with the 'flip-open' spout feature to sometimes very annoyingly shoot about 1/2 teaspoon of liquid up and out the spout like a geyser when opening it.   Not good.

Yogi Robt

9:53 a.m. on May 2, 2011 (EDT)
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Has anyone used any of these type bottles for hot/boiled water? Do they hold up well? What bottle would be suggested for this: http://www.trailspace.com/gear/gsi/h2jo-coffee-filter/

11:09 a.m. on May 3, 2011 (EDT)
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That's just another piece of gear that is singular-purpose, and not terribly small.

Try the MSR MugMate.   Smaller.  Uses your cup/mug. Also, can be used right in your home kitchen (I do) to replace French-press.

Yogi Robt

12:27 p.m. on May 3, 2011 (EDT)
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@Bkuti,

I use one all the time for car camping.  I have used mine with just about every version of the Nalgene bottles listed above.  I have found it does a good job of brewing up some coffee and keeping the grounds out of the liquid.

No issues with durability yet, have had mine for a few years now and have not had any problems.  Depending on what you are doing with it, you will just want to watch out for the mesh screen.  As long as it stays intact you should get many good years of use.

6:02 a.m. on May 4, 2011 (EDT)
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I'll have to take back my comment about the GSI H2JO.

I was thinking it required a dedicated bottle / container.

10:40 a.m. on May 4, 2011 (EDT)
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Robert Rowe -Thanks. I have the MSR Mug Mate. It does give me one of the best cups of coffee in the backcountry. My issues with it is it's durability/packability. I usually store other stuff in my mug so I don't have the best place to keep it. And I'm always afraid it's doing to break somewhere else in my pack.And at $16, I want it to last a long time.

I always bring a empty Nalgene bottle with me that ends up being used for extra water. I figured the H2JO can store right in the bottle along with coffee supplies. I might just try it.

Bunn - Thanks for the feedback. I guess unless you fill the bottle, the water only passes threw the filter. What I like about the Mug Mate is the ability to let the coffee sit in the water a bit to make it stronger. Whats your opinion? Is the coffee weak, mild or strong (with one pass of the filter)?

8:40 a.m. on May 5, 2011 (EDT)
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Bkuti ~~

Upon your suggestion, I looked at the GSI H2JO.   I was at a regional (Annapolis, MD) outdoor-store.   $10.   I liked it, and was going to purchase it.   However; I had encountered a fantastic 'deal' on a Patagonia down-sweater, and a great pair of Acr'teryx hiking pants.   Wiped-out my cash-on-hand, and I had barely enough $$ for gas and tolls to get home.  I visit this store and another, fairly regularly.  So, I shall get the H2JO upon my next visit.  Thanks for your recommendation.

Yogi Robt

11:11 a.m. on May 6, 2011 (EDT)
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Yea I can only go into a gear store with limited cash and no credit card, or I'd be in a lot of trouble/debt. The same just happened to me. I was looking at the H2JO, had it in my hand, but had to chose between that or the UCO Oil Lamp Insert for my candle lantern. I went with the oil lamp, and love it. So much better/brighter/cleaner than the candles. I would recommend them to anyone who owns the candle lantern.

But next trip to the store, it's all about the H2JO and some more HDPE bottles. I have one already and like it. The price is right one them and so are the bright colors.

Your welcome Robert Rowe.

3:33 p.m. on May 6, 2011 (EDT)
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The transparent and lightly-colored translucent Tritan Nalgenes can be used with the SODIS method of water treatment, while the same cannot be said of the HDPE ones...

6:09 p.m. on May 6, 2011 (EDT)
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pillowthread said:

The transparent and lightly-colored translucent Tritan Nalgenes can be used with the SODIS method of water treatment, while the same cannot be said of the HDPE ones...

 Hmmm ....   Didn't know that!

Yogi Robt

8:04 a.m. on May 9, 2011 (EDT)
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i don't use Sodis to purify water, but i thought it was tested using clear PET bottles.  does anyone know if it has been tested with Tritan?

For anyone who doesn't know, the theory behind Sodis is that placing water in a clear PET or glass bottle and letting it sit in the sun for six hours will kill harmful bacteria via UV radiation.  HDPE and polycarbonate bottles block UV rays to some degree, so they wouldn't be appropriate for Sodis.  (polycarbonate is the old hard plastic lexan bottle that were found to leach BPA and were largely replaced as a material for water bottles).

personally, i'm more comfortable with filters or UV wands than Sodis, but i would want to know whether Tritan copolyester blocks UV radiation before trying Sodis.  and, if i were going to try it, i would find clear tritan bottles - there has to be some risk that tinted Tritan bottles block some UV rays.  

6:15 a.m. on May 10, 2011 (EDT)
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Support bacteria ... they are the only culture some people have.  --  R. Rowe

12:06 a.m. on May 16, 2011 (EDT)
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I picked up a H2JO and used it on the trail this past weekend. It took me three tries to get the right coffee (to dark, to light, just right). I used it with a Nalgene HDPE bottle. Besides getting the bottle really hot and having the bottle suck itself in while capped with hot coffee (went back to shape with the lid opened) it works just fine. I'm thinking the Tritan bottle might be better. I do like the H2JO better than my Mugmate. It seems more durable, neater, six bucks cheaper and it packs right into the bottle along with my coffee supplies.

I also found out how nicely two bottles of wine fit into a 48 oz Nalegene bottle. The wine kept well after being in there for about five hours before it was opened again and enjoyed throughout the night.

Good coffee and good wine. And I used to uses these bottles just for water.

7:27 a.m. on May 16, 2011 (EDT)
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Bkuti said:

I picked up a H2JO and used it on the trail this past weekend. It took me three tries to get the right coffee (to dark, to light, just right). I used it with a Nalgene HDPE bottle. Besides getting the bottle really hot and having the bottle suck itself in while capped with hot coffee (went back to shape with the lid opened) it works just fine. I'm thinking the Tritan bottle might be better. I do like the H2JO better than my Mugmate. It seems more durable, neater, six bucks cheaper and it packs right into the bottle along with my coffee supplies.

I also found out how nicely two bottles of wine fit into a 48 oz Nalegene bottle. The wine kept well after being in there for about five hours before it was opened again and enjoyed throughout the night.

Good coffee and good wine. And I used to uses these bottles just for water.

 

I haven't used my H2JOE, yet.   Seems to me one will need to shake the Nalgene bottle, or invert it, to get a good brew.   The basket will probably only hold 3-4 scoops (2-tbs each) of ground coffee.  

Correct?   Or, how did you do your's?

Yogi Robt

10:26 a.m. on May 16, 2011 (EDT)
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Robert Rowe said:

Bkuti said:

I picked up a H2JO and used it on the trail this past weekend. It took me three tries to get the right coffee (to dark, to light, just right). I used it with a Nalgene HDPE bottle. Besides getting the bottle really hot and having the bottle suck itself in while capped with hot coffee (went back to shape with the lid opened) it works just fine. I'm thinking the Tritan bottle might be better. I do like the H2JO better than my Mugmate. It seems more durable, neater, six bucks cheaper and it packs right into the bottle along with my coffee supplies.

I also found out how nicely two bottles of wine fit into a 48 oz Nalegene bottle. The wine kept well after being in there for about five hours before it was opened again and enjoyed throughout the night.

Good coffee and good wine. And I used to uses these bottles just for water.

 

I haven't used my H2JOE, yet.   Seems to me one will need to shake the Nalgene bottle, or invert it, to get a good brew.   The basket will probably only hold 3-4 scoops (2-tbs each) of ground coffee.  

Correct?   Or, how did you do your's?

Yogi Robt

The H2JO comes with instructions rolled up inside the basket. I followed them.

Put boiling water in bottle.

attach H2JO with coffee in it.

Tighten cap, turn upside down and let sit for three minutes.

I did shake the first time and got really strong coffee, but I think I just put to much coffee in the basket.  I do like my coffee more on the dark side, but the 1st batch was mud, so it was a bit of trial and error.

I'm sure you can get 5 or so scoops in their. I liked the idea of having coffee ready in the bottle (unlike the MugMate where you get a cup at a time). My first two cups go quick so it's nice that it's there. As I mentioned, when I left the bottle capped with hot coffee inside, the bottle got sucked in a bit. No biggie. I can't see that happening with a tritan bottle though.

I like some cream in my coffee and found Mini Moos,  real (kinda) cream in those little cups like you get at a diner. They don't need to be refrigerated and are found on the shelf next to the powder stuff in the super market. I fit about six of those,  a little bag of sugar, a bag of coffee and a telescoping GSI spoon along with the H2JO all inside a Nalgene bottle. Its all organized, protected and ready to go. I really like this system. I don't see the MugMate going with me anymore.

Let us know how you like it when you use it. I can't see any complaints about it at all.


 

8:53 p.m. on May 17, 2011 (EDT)
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I went to three fairly well-equipped outdoor-stores today.

I am specifically looking for a .75-litre (or smaller) Nalgene bottle, to use the H2JOE.   I can't see using the 1.-litre size.   It's too big.  I generally prefer to make coffee in small batches, of 1 or 2 cups at at time.   Is best for arriving at 'peak flavor'.   And ... I feel that is what I want to continue doing.  

However; I wouldn't mind brewing 3-to-4 cup (medium-sized mug, actually) batches, when someone is accompanying me.

No luck on the .75-litre Nalgene bottles.   I did see some made by GSI, but they didn't look thick enough to hold-up to boiling water, over time.

The search continues ....   (I am persistent).

Yogi Robt

12:09 a.m. on May 18, 2011 (EDT)
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Robert Rowe said:

I went to three fairly well-equipped outdoor-stores today.

I am specifically looking for a .75-litre (or smaller) Nalgene bottle, to use the H2JOE.   I can't see using the 1.-litre size.   It's too big.  I generally prefer to make coffee in small batches, of 1 or 2 cups at at time.   Is best for arriving at 'peak flavor'.   And ... I feel that is what I want to continue doing.  

However; I wouldn't mind brewing 3-to-4 cup (medium-sized mug, actually) batches, when someone is accompanying me.

No luck on the .75-litre Nalgene bottles.   I did see some made by GSI, but they didn't look thick enough to hold-up to boiling water, over time.

The search continues ....   (I am persistent).

Yogi Robt

 Yea I can see a liter bottle being a bit overkill for coffee. But I do like the size for packing other stuff (coffee supplies) right into the bottle.

Maybe one of these can work for you:

http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/CAMOmnifindQueryCmd?storeId=226&catalogId=40000000226&langId=-1&searchCategory=&ip_state=&ip_constrain=&ip_navtype=search&pageSize=24&currentPage=&ip_sortBy=&searchKeywords=67726

http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/CAMOmnifindQueryCmd?storeId=226&catalogId=40000000226&langId=-1&searchCategory=&ip_state=&ip_constrain=&ip_navtype=search&pageSize=24&currentPage=&ip_sortBy=&searchKeywords=67727


They have similar, if not the same material as the Nalgene tritan bottles.

4:16 a.m. on May 18, 2011 (EDT)
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Nalgene do make wide mouth tritaln's 16oz

http://www.backcountry.com/nalgene-wide-mouth-tritan-bottle-16oz

I want to email waterbox to see if they will fit - it'll be a cool coffee set :)

http://www.waterboxco.com/

8:04 a.m. on May 18, 2011 (EDT)
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Thanks for the links.   Very helpful.

As H. Ross Perot would say, "Problem solved!"

Yogi Robt

7:39 p.m. on June 24, 2011 (EDT)
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I seem to recall some health concern surrounding the various materials that mandated the recent change in plastic used in Nalgenes.

What was the deal with that? Was it a valid thing? I have older Nalgenes I'd prefer not to replace, but that's contingent on what the health risk may have been...    :0

8:02 p.m. on June 24, 2011 (EDT)
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I actually prefer the older Nalgene bottles.  I have about 8-to-10 of them, in various places, including my Vans (one of which is a VW Westphalia Camper).

I think (?) the concerns with the older bottles had something to do with the polycarbonate plastic / Lexan out-gassing and leaching BPA compounds.

It's not that I used these everyday ... 'Ya know?

__________________________________________________

UPDATE:

I am now using the GSI H2JOE pretty regularly to brew coffee.   Am preferring it over the MUGMATE.   I did score two 1/2 litre Nalgene bottles, and they seem to be perfect for my use in this application.  I am using the H2JOE every morning in my kitchen at home.   I grind my own beans, and found it necessary to grind the beans on the "coarse"-setting, to make the best coffee, without a lot of "mud" in the bottom of the cup.  A little "silt" does accumulate, but not much.

____________________________________________________

  Yogi Robt

September 30, 2014
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