nonstinky synthetic baselayer?

11:31 a.m. on May 21, 2011 (EDT)
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short sleeve t shirt for summer.  the thin icebreaker shirt i use is indeed odor-free and a great material generally, but high 80's and above and humid, it's not ideal.  i live in the mid-atlantic, so hot and humid is the norm.  

patagonia capilene, the lightest weight, works but every 18-24 months, the odor-defeating properties disappear.  maybe i'm doomed to occasional replacement.

north face flight series gets smelly and stays damp longer than most would like.

have a columbia snap short sleeve shirt that's fine, but not a t-shirt, and doesn't wick well (does dry quickly).

underarmour gets smelly and doesn't wear dry that well.

my old polypro t-shirts - great fabric properties, poor feel next to skin, and don't get me started about the horrific stink.  

anyone tried the arcteryx phase shirts? any other ideas?

11:09 p.m. on May 21, 2011 (EDT)
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leadbelly I just jumped on icebreakers website. Which baslayer T shirt do you have? They have different one's based on conditions.Sounds like the jungle would work..I have as far as now haven't had my Morreno base lite top loose it's properties but their not 18 months old..

2:22 a.m. on May 22, 2011 (EDT)
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Get one shirt per season or two.  After a few washes and hard use there is not much if at all that will retain and act as new.

You are doomed.

8:55 a.m. on May 22, 2011 (EDT)
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I do have an Arc'teryx Ether comp crew LS - I like it better then my Patagonia cap 1 (got 4-5 of them). I use the cap 1 when running etc, but I don't sure if I like it when hiking, just doesn't feel 100% right. The Ether is not as tight fitting and work great, I can't really smell anything after few days out in the desert and my hiking buddies were kind enough to keep quite about it :)

But if I would buy a new one, I would get the Ether and not the Ether comp, I think it'll be better for real hot and humid.

The Motus is 20 gr litter, don't know how it feel or preform

http://www.arcteryx.com/Compare.aspx?EN/model1=8899&model2=7649
 

9:02 p.m. on May 22, 2011 (EDT)
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the icebreaker i use is the hopper T - an almost perfect baselayer, really.  used again today, warm humid day, and it was quite damp but dried nicely in a half hour once i slowed down.  icebreaker's boxer shorts are a lighter weight merino, i might look into that.  i'm not sure there is a good synthetic solution, but i read somewhere that arcteryx does a good job avoiding the stink.    

12:18 a.m. on May 23, 2011 (EDT)
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Fuggeddabouddit !  (as my buddies in Brooklyn say)


I'm even in more humidity in my part of the Mid-Atlantic (Maryland's Eastern Shore -- near the Chesapeake Bay).

I've gone away from the synthetics, for base-layers.   I really got into this issue quite deeply.   Even shared 'notes' with guys that work at outdoor stores. Bike dudes, marathoners, tri-athaletes, climbers, hikers.     Unanimous.   Go for the merino.

I have about a dozen (or more) T-shirts (merino).   Long-sleeve, short-sleeve.   Ibex, Icebreaker, I/O, SmartWool.  Probably over $800 worth of T-shirts.

Have learned that even when it SEEMS AS THOUGH you've washed the stink out of synths ... when you start sweating in them again, the stink COMES BACK with a vengeance.  X2 (or worse).

Don't waste your money, nor your time on synth T-shirts.   Screw the Arc'teryx synth T's, as well.  I like their products; have 4 pairs of their hiking pants.

If somebody made a synth T-shirt with X-Static (silver inter-twined in the fabric) I might give it a try.   But, I doubt it.  Why bother, when the merino does it all?

Yogi Robt

6:17 a.m. on May 23, 2011 (EDT)
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I haven't run into this problem with the synthetic t-shirts I use during summer months. When I bought mine, I was on a budget, so I bought synthetic work out shirts from Kohls. They were $10 each, and despite LOTS of sweating during humid summer hikes and LOTS of workouts, they have no smell at all.

They are the same materials as all of the mentioned brand except merino, because there's no wool in them, but a fraction of the price. Hey if it DOES get stinky, it's cheap to replace.

10:38 a.m. on May 23, 2011 (EDT)
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I started trying the synthetics from Scandanavia, when they first hit the gear shop shelves in the late '70s and  have tried all kinds of the stuff since that time. I have come to detest it and am now just wearing out some Cabela's supposedly "scent-free" gonch and some MEC gonch and will not buy any more.

I started using the old "Mellofleece" merino wool longjohns from "merrye Englande" in the mid-'60s and now wear Smartwool, Icebreaker, MEC and IoBio merino baselayers exclusively in the bush and am NOT going to change as this works perfectly.

I am not one to develop a strong body odor and my wife often comments on this, it is a metabolic and genetically-based issue, IMO, however, even with a recent shower and Mitchum's "antistink", I can smell a chemical-sweat stink when wearing synthetics that I find rather unpleasant. Each to his own, but, while I am a huge fan of SOME recent synthetic clothing-gear developments, especially "eVent" and "Primaloft", I just cannot stand synthetic undies.

5:08 p.m. on May 23, 2011 (EDT)
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the only stinky problem i run into is with my socks. I wear nothing but smart wool, and even after a good washing, still has a little twinge to it...

7:28 p.m. on May 23, 2011 (EDT)
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I think (?) I first acquired synthetic undergarments in the early-to-mid 1970s.   First-generation Patagonia "Capilene" and the polypro stuff from Helly-Hansen (the blue shirts with the goofy / dopey white chevron-stripes on the sleeves and shoulders).

Good Grief!   "Stink City"!

And (so I am told by various female-types) I have no body odor.   Just the "sweet smell of success" ( Uh-huh ).

Synth T's are interesting in concept.  I really DO wish they could counter the "stinky-poo's".   That merino stuff is NOT cheap!

I shall await technology to advance, however.  I'll let the 'prols' test and decide.  In the meanwhile ... I'm HAPPY in my merinos.

BTW -- Underarm deodorant is fine.  The stuff in antiperspirants DOES NOT launder out easily.   Ever notice the residue in the armpit areas of shirts, after laundering?

Yogi Robt

6:13 p.m. on May 25, 2011 (EDT)
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yes I have Robert, I've actually had to throw tshirts away before because of the crusty deodorant remains...annoying.

8:10 a.m. on May 26, 2011 (EDT)
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From the net:

Antiperspirant underarm deodorants using Aluminum compounds 

Aluminum chloride, aluminum chlorohydrate, aluminum-zirconium compounds, most notably aluminum zirconium tetrachloro-hydrate, are the most widely used aluminum compounds used in antiperspirants.

Aluminum is poorly absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract; roughly 0.1% of the dietary intake is absorbed.

( And we worry about cooking with aluminum utensils .... )

Further:

 ... studies have shown that the absorption of aluminum through the skin causes a greater burden on the body than oral ingestion.   A 2001 study showed that aluminum was still present  in blood samples, 15-days after ONE application of antiperspirant to the armpit.   Consequently, applying to the skin is a very effective way to get Aluminum in your system, and in your brain.


More troubling --  Aluminum as a NEUROTOXIN is linked to Alzheimer's Disease, and other neurological diseases.

______________________

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9:10 a.m. on May 26, 2011 (EDT)
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I use everything mentioned and have never had the "stink" problem.Must just be some folks body chemistry.I do feel blessed!I love my synthetic shirts and base layers.

10:18 a.m. on May 26, 2011 (EDT)
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Ya, synthetic gets funky. With my underarmor cold gear I apply deodorant to the pits on the outside of the shirt.  Works ok.  Some new stuff boasts antibacterial properties. 

Bamboo is supposed to be good about that too but its not truly synthetic, or totally natural either. 

Btw "natural" is not a word that is very regulated by the gvt.  You can legally call about anything natural. 

1:22 p.m. on May 26, 2011 (EDT)
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i think synthetics have come a long way in dealing with odor, by treating them with silver particles.  eventually, these treatments come out in the wash.  some of the heavier synthetic baselayers i have, which are generally worn on top of something else and not laundered as frequently, can go a number of years without having a significant odor issue.  it's the layer closest to the skin that is the issue, at least for me.  after about 18 months and relatively frequent laundering, every odor-diffusing option seems to, well, stink.

thanks for all the comments.  i'm resigned to wearing my merino t-shirt and looking for a lighter-weight merino t-shirt on sale. 

1:51 p.m. on May 26, 2011 (EDT)
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FromSagetoSnow said:

 

 ... "natural" is not a word that is very regulated by the gvt.  You can legally call about anything natural. 

 

Correcto-mundo !

I consider good Scotch and fine Cognac among the best "natural" substances extant.

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9:18 a.m. on May 27, 2011 (EDT)
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FromSagetoSnow said:

 

Bamboo is supposed to be good about that too but its not truly synthetic, or totally natural either. 

 

Actually, bamboo is 'natural'.   It is the processing thereof, that renders the end-product with some 'suspect' chemicals.

Sorta like "viscose"  and "rayon".   These materials are derived from 'natural' sources, but must be processed with chemicals to be used in textile fabrics.

If you think about it ... food-products are processed with all sorts of chemicals.   For example:   decaffeinated coffee (most types).

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NoSmo King

9:32 a.m. on May 27, 2011 (EDT)
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You said it better Rob. 

Still, "natural" on a label guarantees nothing. 

10:09 a.m. on May 27, 2011 (EDT)
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FromSagetoSnow said:

 

You said it better Rob. 

Still, "natural" on a label guarantees nothing. 

 

Egg-zachary  !   ( A word I picked-up from my Asian former girlfriend ).

As-a-matter-of-fact, the phrase, 'natural gas'  comes to mind.  

I passed some this morning ....

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~r2~

8:45 p.m. on May 27, 2011 (EDT)
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all natural food isn't necessarily natural???

lol.

plutonium and sulfuric acid are naturally occurring substances. I don't want them in my body.

9:55 p.m. on May 27, 2011 (EDT)
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My urine has an odd odor (or "odour", if you're from the UK, Canada), after consuming asparagus.

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