Hiking Gloves ?? ( NOT for warmth)

10:12 p.m. on June 13, 2011 (EDT)
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Other than Winter / cold-weather conditions, when  thick or insulated gloves are de rigeour, I hike with thin gloves on each hand.   I do use trekking-poles, most of the time ... so, the gloves do assist in improving grippage. 

I might add, that I find that cork-handled trekking-poles to be superior, in any event, whether with, or without, wearing gloves.  EVA is a material I avoid, if possible (even in boot insoles).  Many reasons.

I have tried many types of thin gloves.   Hot weather becomes problematic, and sweat-through is an issue.  However; the benefits outweigh the 'cons'.

I  began realizing the wisdom of having a pair of gloves, packing them along with the rest of my backpacking gear, in the inevitable circumstance of having occasion to use them.

The first time this occurred, was when hiking some steep trails at Delaware Water Gap State (Nat'l ?) Park, situated near the juncture of NorthWestern New Jersey and NorthEastern Pennsylvania.

I found it necessary to grasp small-to-medium diameter tree saplings, in order to ascend some off-trail routes I selected.  As it was late October, I had packed along a pair of leather work gloves thinking cool temps might occur.   That was not the case, but the gloves were marvelous in assisting the gripping of saplings and rock out-croppings, in my ascent effort.

I have since experimented with very "grippy" mechanic's gloves.   They work nicely, but feel a little too snug.  In fairness, they are supposed to fit this way, but I found them a little too restrictive for comfort.

They also reduce discomfort in the wrist areas, when the trekking-pole hand straps are used.

Leather work-gloves seem to be my "favs".

Anyone here have comments or suggestions?

_________________________

   ~r2~

10:34 p.m. on June 13, 2011 (EDT)
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I have worn gloves for scrambling up steep rocky slopes as you describe, years ago I tried 'work out' gloves, but they offered no protection for my fingers.

Now I carry a very light and thin knit glove with a urethane coating on the grip side (inside of the hand). They work quite well, and also help out with handling hot pots etc.

2:32 a.m. on June 14, 2011 (EDT)
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Personally I use fingerless gloves like I wear for biking (motorcyle).  Right now I'm using a pair of Wells Lamont Sport Utility Gloves  called "SUG".  They make some Gel palmed fingerless gloves with gell palms for biking (bicycle) that might be nice if one were using trekking poles.  Haven't found the right Golf clubs yet to test that theory as of  yet.  I find that full fingered gloves impede everthing I want to do when on the trail, biking,  or any other activity.   I only use fullfinger gloves when in the cold or for working with thorny plants such as blackberries or roses.

8:47 a.m. on June 14, 2011 (EDT)
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I DO like the variety of glove offerings by Wells-Lamont.   Their work-gloves are "bomber".   I usually go for the full leather variety, selecting one size SMALLER than my 'proper' size.   Upon a number of 'sweat-throughs', and maybe a slather of "Lexol" now-and-then (or any good leather conditioner), they seems to stretch a little, and mold nicely to your hand, for an almost perfect fit.

I am going to try your suggestion, Brian, and get the fingerless model.

________________________________

    ~r2~

4:24 p.m. on June 14, 2011 (EDT)
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I know we usually shy away from cotton but the ones I use are 95% cotton 5% spandex with two of the middle fingers having the slightly tacky small rubber bumps and a reinforced palm area.  I would stay way from leather as possible.  I find that when leather absorbs sweat it's slow to dry and it then wears very quickly.  I still use the leather type when on my motorcycle but have found the spandex varieties much better for hiking/camping/backpacking.  When and if you find the ones you like by a bunch of them (a case).  Like boots and shoes, I think that when companies see that they are making a product that I really like that is far and above the make and quality of all the other competing products they immediatly take it of the shelf and stop making it, I really think each company as a division dedicated to this purpose.

8:45 p.m. on June 14, 2011 (EDT)
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These are the gloves I was thinking of:

http://ansellpro.com/product-catalog/ProductDetail.aspx?productId=312


imagesAnsellGloves.jpg

Ansell HyFlex Lite 11-600

A stretch nylon glove, palm coated in polyurethane.

I love these when I don't need my winter gloves, they are grippy, and very light at 22gms per pair. Finger dexterity is great, I can even tie fishing line with them on.



3:37 a.m. on June 15, 2011 (EDT)
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Robert,  I read up on the gloves that trouthunter recomended.  They look like they might fit the bill.  They are water proof/resistant and they breath.  They very well might work for you either alone or in conjunction with fingerless gloves as I've been looking for a light weight thin glove to go under my fingerless gloves when its to cold for fingerless but to warm for real gloves.  When doubled up they'll  provide light weight warmth along with allowing full dexterity.

 

trouthunter, where are you buying your gloves?

11:16 a.m. on June 15, 2011 (EDT)
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I carry a pair of biking gloves, though don't often use them.  You know the kind; no fingers and padded on the palms.  I like a size larger then normal, so they fit a tad loose.  They come in handy when photographing stuff low to the ground and scrambling around rocks and through brush.  I tend to combine hiking and geocaching, so I'm always off trail somewhere.

11:16 a.m. on June 15, 2011 (EDT)
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apeman said:

 ...   When and if you find the ones you like by a bunch of them (a case).  Like boots and shoes, I think that when companies see that they are making a product that I really like that is far and above the make and quality of all the other competing products they immediatly take it of the shelf and stop making it, I really think each company as a division dedicated to this purpose.

 

Hilarious, Brian.

I have noticed the same thing.  It's a "CONSPIRACY".

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     ~r2~

11:19 a.m. on June 15, 2011 (EDT)
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trouthunter said:

These are the gloves I was thinking of:

http://ansellpro.com/product-catalog/ProductDetail.aspx?productId=312


imagesAnsellGloves.jpg

Ansell HyFlex Lite 11-600

A stretch nylon glove, palm coated in polyurethane.

I love these when I don't need my winter gloves, they are grippy, and very light at 22gms per pair. Finger dexterity is great, I can even tie fishing line with them on.



 Good link, Mike.   Thanks.

And, as Brian asks, where do you buy them?

_______________________________

   ~r2~

3:48 p.m. on June 15, 2011 (EDT)
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I sometimes use deerskin leather work gloves if I expect to be scrambling. Similar to what I would use to belay. Have found cycling gloves are cooler on hot days but more prone to wear and tear.

Have found cowhide work gloves resist abuse even better, but are also stiff enough that I can get blisters unless they are pretty old and worn.

6:47 p.m. on June 15, 2011 (EDT)
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I can get the Ansell gloves at Critical Tool.

They sell for around 30.00 USD for a dozen, about 2.50 per pair.

They are thin and will wear through in time, but the dexterity and very light weight sold me.

9:17 p.m. on June 15, 2011 (EDT)
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Thanks,  trout

11:01 p.m. on June 15, 2011 (EDT)
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I like the lightweight, "tactical" style gloves offered from 5.11, Hatch, or the like. I've also used golf gloves with great success. Actually, golf gloves are the best hiking hand-wear I've ever used. Super lightweight, great grip on the poles, and insanely dexterous. Just couldn't use them for any kind of scrambling, as the leather is really thin, and would likely abrade with any rock contact.

11:15 p.m. on June 15, 2011 (EDT)
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While I haven't used them for hiking, have you looked at sailing gloves? They are designed with strong palms and fingers to withstand the wear of lines when you're easing sails and provide grip when hauling them in. They have mesh on the back for airflow. You can get them with finger tips, or without. There are various companies that make them.
Harken-Gloves.jpg
I use Harken tipless when I sail.

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