Insoles/Boot Fitting.

7:35 p.m. on June 24, 2011 (EDT)
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How many of your girls and guys are commonly using an aftermarket insole in your boots/hiking footwear?

 

When you buy hiking footwear, are you likely to use a local fitter or are you hitting the web to get new footwear?

 

Interested in where the feedback falls on this forum. Have a save weekend guys!

8:15 p.m. on June 24, 2011 (EDT)
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Tom ~~

I use an aftermarket insole in ALL my boots, and in some of my shoes.

I found the absolute BEST INSOLES to be the real thick, FELT ones.

They are not easy to find, though.   I usually hit the "outdoor stores" catering to the hunting and fishing enthusiasts, to be the best source.   Like Cabela's, Dick's, Gander Mountain.   The brand to look / ask for is "LaCrosse" (from LaCrosse, Wisconsin).

These felt insoles are reversible.  I usually (now) buy boots 1/2 size larger than my 'normal' size.    This compensates for the extra volume taken-up by the felt insoles.   I use them in my "Pac-Boots" also, in the Winter.  I double them up (2 pairs).    I buy many pairs of these insoles when I find them.   They're about $5 / pr.   Even use them in sneakers, now.

They soak-up prodigious amounts of moisture, and dry fairly fast.   VERY comfortable, too.

I was thinking of trying to find some raw felt material, to make my own.   Would use the insoles I have for a pattern, and just cut them out.   They can be easily trimmed to fit.

__________________________________________________

    ~r2~

10:50 p.m. on June 24, 2011 (EDT)
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I prefer to go to a big box store to try on different brands sizes etc. then go online and purchase. I don't go to an outfitter because I don't want to waste their time and take advantage of them if I have no intention of buying from them.  I will go to an outfitter if I need the service and knowledge of somebody that I can deal with face to face. I don't need that to find a pair of shoes. I can get enough different opinions of what to look for in pair of boots or shoes, it's up to me to make sure you have a comfortable fit. Some online retailers now offer free RETURN shipping on shoes allowing you to order several sizes and then send the wrong sizes back. 

 

1:35 p.m. on June 25, 2011 (EDT)
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I am kinda mixed on the whole thing. It all depends on availability and price.

I have run across some pretty good deals at my local retail shops but my latest aquisition(SCARPA SL M3s) I ordered w/o trying on. I have a pretty good idea of what works with my feet from being tortured over the years with boots that I thought fit and didn't. Or ones that did and just "petered out" on the trail.

I as well as others was on the search for a boot that just simply worked FOR ME. Ones that fit and did exactly what they claim to do and take the hammering I will put them through.

I really have a good feeling with my latest purchase. Ya know that feeling ya get when ya put them on in the morning and go "awe, thats nice."

One of the reasons I typically don't recommend boots is because its so personal. Feet remind me of fingerprints in some sort of weird way.

As the previous poster(ocala) stated I don't mind advising on what to look for in a boot being that I have made a ton of poor choices over the years but with those mistakes comes the experience to make solid choices over time. Whether a boot will fit another person is a recommendation I cannot make.  

So as far as fitting goes it really doesn't matter either way to me. The ultimate ending choice is gonna be mine. No boot fitter can tell me how my feet feel. I am still somewhat young but after 34yrs and $1000s of dollars I think I have a pretty good idea. :)

As far as insoles. That totally depends on what the boots feel like as well. I have a few pair of boots that I still have the stockers in. When they crap out I will contact the manufacturer for replacements just because they work . I also have some footwear that have SF greens, and Sole insoles in them. It all depends on feel, arch support, and cushioning desires. Not to mention how long it takes the stockers to crap out and croak.

If the stockers feel fine like the latest ones I have I will just stick with them.

Robert, I know exactly of the felt ones you are speaking in reference too. They are great. Pretty thick from my recollection so the way the footwear fits from the get-go is gonna be a great deciding factor of whether or not an insole like this can be utilized. As you have stated they will take up a bit of boot interior real estate.

5:33 p.m. on June 25, 2011 (EDT)
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Rick-Pittsburgh said:

Robert, I know exactly of the felt ones you are speaking in reference too. They are great. Pretty thick from my recollection so the way the footwear fits from the get-go is gonna be a great deciding factor of whether or not an insole like this can be utilized. As you have stated they will take up a bit of boot interior real estate.

 

They're great, Rick.

I have taken to bringing the felt insoles with me, when I go shopping for a pair of boots ... which is kinda rare, anyhow, now-a-days ... being as I have a couple pairs of Italian FGLs, and a couple pairs of those dreadful Gore-Tex lined boots (they're made in Italy, also, and I hope they soon wear out).

Almost don't have to bring the insoles along, being as I almost always have a pair in the street shoes I happen to be wearing, when I shop for boots.

As I mentioned, I go 1/2 size larger.   When trying the boots or shoes in the outdoor store, I take out the factory-installed liner and put it my felt liners.

The factory-supplied liners are usually "junk", anyhow.  EVA.   You all know about EVA, right?   If not, ask, and I'll fill you in.   You should AVOID EVA anything, if you possibly can.

___________________________________

   ~r2~

6:05 p.m. on June 25, 2011 (EDT)
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I do not like EVA at all. Companies utilize it in so many ways(I feel another new thread coming.) Inside a boot, outside a boot. Outside is the worst. I have had it "chunk off" in rocky terrain. I pretty much put it in the same category as I do membranes.

The boots I just purchased utilize what seems to be a real thick dense fabric material for the insole. I am not sure what it is. Plus no exposed EVA garbage on the outer(midsole area.) All rubber. :)

I believe companies utilize EVA for the weight savings/comfort but at the same time I personally feel from experience that it also substantially effects the durability factor of footwear. Then again it all has to do with the terrain you are subjecting your footwear too.

For where I go and what I do I will take a pair of well-made battleships on my feet over the "newest, latest, and greatest" technological wonders on the market today w/o a second thought.

6:37 p.m. on June 25, 2011 (EDT)
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Superfeet insoles are a god send. Green and thermal. All the way.

9:01 p.m. on June 25, 2011 (EDT)
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What is EVA? I want to avoid it.

9:11 p.m. on June 25, 2011 (EDT)
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Its that foam garbage that is sometimes used in between the boot upper and the sole. Typically used on running shoes.

Scroll down to the "soles" section contained in the link.

http://www.sierratradingpost.com/lp2/hiking-footwear-guide.html

More in depth of what EVA is.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethylene-vinyl_acetate

6:48 a.m. on June 26, 2011 (EDT)
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One of the worst things you can do, is leave ANYTHING with EVA in the trunk of your car during the Summer ... or, put the article in your attic.   Especially those dreadfully high-priced "designer" sneakers.

Heat literally makes all those tiny nitrogen-filled bubbles burst.  In time, the items with EVA begin to "crumble" into dust.  The manufacturers utilizing EVA in their products LOVE this insidious "self-destruct" mechanism.   Forces one to eventually toss the product in a dumpster, and buy another.

I have had to "school" all the Yoga-babes in my classes about this phenomenon with their Yoga mats.   Especially, now that Summer is upon us.

 Yogi Robt

12:02 p.m. on June 26, 2011 (EDT)
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Big fan of Superfeet.  Wish I could afford to have them in almost all my footwear.  Wish I could afford to have professional ones made for me.

3:36 p.m. on June 26, 2011 (EDT)
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I tried using some aftermarket insoles in my Asolo Fugitive boots.  My thinking was since those boots are exceptionally uncomfortable, the insoles might help.  Unfortunately, at least the ones I tried, didn't work out well.  It seemed like they messed up the ventilation Asolo designed into the boot, the result being that my feet sweat.

Maybe I just chose the wrong insoles ...

6:52 p.m. on June 26, 2011 (EDT)
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@ robert, If you want to make your own felt insoles you can start with some wool and felt it yourself.  Go Goggle it, it's pretty easy though I've never done it myself asa one of my religious tenets is to be as lazy as possible ;-}>.   As I raise sheep I'm flush with mostly worthless wool that I usually use to mulch the garden w/ as it keeps the weeds down and the slugs and snails hate it.  If you want to pay for shipping I'd be more than willing to send you some. 

9:41 p.m. on June 26, 2011 (EDT)
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apeman said:

@ robert, If you want to make your own felt insoles you can start with some wool and felt it yourself.  Go Goggle it, it's pretty easy though I've never done it myself asa one of my religious tenets is to be as lazy as possible ;-}>.   As I raise sheep I'm flush with mostly worthless wool that I usually use to mulch the garden w/ as it keeps the weeds down and the slugs and snails hate it.  If you want to pay for shipping I'd be more than willing to send you some. 

 Thanks for the offer, Brian ... but, I have close to what I need in felt-insole supply.   As I mentioned, I probably have close to 20 pairs of the insoles.   The thickest ones are the hardest to find.  I only have a couple pairs, and I use them in Sorel Pac-Boots in Winter conditions (snow).

I may fool-around a bit, cutting-out a few pairs, from a piece of felt I got from a contractor.   He glues strips of this felt to the bottom of trays and buckets, used in working on skylights.   The felt does an unbelievable job in preventing the trays and buckets from sliding down (and off) steeply-sloped asphalt-shingle roofs.   It's like a 'magnet'.   I kid you not !

~r2~

10:15 p.m. on June 26, 2011 (EDT)
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My least favorite insoles are the ones that come with boots at the time of sale,they are worthless.My least favorite after market ones are superfeet insoles,very hard and over priced.There are so many to chose from so much about "what works"is based on a persons own likes or dislikes.Felt also would be low on my own list because once wet it is slow drying.Google insoles and do some shopping,Best Insoles.com,is one of my favorite web site for insoles both because they carry a wide variety of brands but also their prices are good.Remember this is only my opinion and ymmv.

2:14 a.m. on June 27, 2011 (EDT)
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Skimanjohn said:

My least favorite insoles are the ones that come with boots at the time of sale,they are worthless.My least favorite after market ones are superfeet insoles,very hard and over priced.There are so many to chose from so much about "what works"is based on a persons own likes or dislikes.Felt also would be low on my own list because once wet it is slow drying.Google insoles and do some shopping,Best Insoles.com,is one of my favorite web site for insoles both because they carry a wide variety of brands but also their prices are good.Remember this is only my opinion and ymmv.

 Good stuff, thanks alot for the link.

5:18 a.m. on June 27, 2011 (EDT)
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I am NOT in agreement with what Skimanjohn had to comment about felt being slow drying.

Of course, Slow is a relative term.  Slow compared to what?

I don't recall getting the felt insoles I use totally saturated with water.   When damp, I merely flipped them over,  reversed them, and continued my activity.

I have removed them, a time-or-two, and clipped them to my backpack to air-dry.   Merely re-tightened the laces on my boots to snug them better on my feet.  I never seemed to notice much discomfort.  If I did, I would have probably added the spare pair of socks I tote, to help fill the inside boot volume.

Keep in mind, wool is excellent for drying as you wear the article, and does not induce hypothermia.

~r2~

9:02 a.m. on June 27, 2011 (EDT)
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I agree with "Skiman" and seldom use the old felt insoles as they soak up sweat and will not dry until you have a heated shelter, such as a silnylon tipi, wall tent or cabin to hang them in over a stove. They also compress quickly and thus the fit of your boots is altered, more crucial in technical climbing, such as ice, than in trail hiking.

I had some heat moldable insoles, given me by a "rep" from Scarpa, IIRC about ten years ago, when I retired as a "boot fitter" at a major gear vendor's here in BC. I liked then, well enough, but, I really prefer light synthetic insoles and good socks, PLUS, fitting my boots properly when I buy them.

I have some boots with leather insoles, shaped to my feet over time of careful "break-in" and I prefer these overall to about anything else. I also prefer the synthetic liners for pack boots sold by Hoffman's, White's and Schnee's to a woolen felt type, these are a big improvement and I keep 3 pairs per pair of boots.

1:33 p.m. on June 28, 2011 (EDT)
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Leather is awesome. +1 on that Dewey.

3:17 p.m. on June 28, 2011 (EDT)
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Patent leather = NOT recommended.

BTW -- I guess my feet do not sweat much.  Never have / had a problem with felt insoles getting too damp from perspiration.   I have learned ("micro-managed") to regulate foot heat with various sock combo's.

________________

 ~r2~

3:47 p.m. on June 28, 2011 (EDT)
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I like the replacement insoles because of additional support and cradling.  Keeps the dogs from barking.  Felts and textile-only never helped with that.

5:21 p.m. on June 28, 2011 (EDT)
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Much of that has to do with FIT and I have found that very few gear store clerks really KNOW how to fit a boot correctly. I do and have trained a number of others and will say that, IF, you buy a GOOD, leather boot correctly fitted to YOUR feet and break it in properly, you will not require insoles other than simple leather ones and good sox.

I prefer my boots to be of FGL, 8-9" high and built to withstand scree and water and give support when  descending under a heavy-75 lbs.+ pack and such  boots really do not require replacement footbeds for most people's feet.

7:14 p.m. on July 7, 2011 (EDT)
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I was about to return a low cut version of llbean day hikers because one of my feet pronated and I could feel trouble coming. The saleswoman suggested the Green Superfeet Insoles. I pulled out my trusty Victornix and used the scissors to size and shape the insoles; took a long walk around and up and down the store; and found comfort and no pain.

I have heard that a well known custom boot maker does not believe in insoles, but it was second hand info so I don't know how that goes for sure.

10:55 p.m. on July 7, 2011 (EDT)
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trying boots on is always the best option.  ironically, all the boots and trail runners i currently wear were purchased without trying them on.

the two pair of leather boots i wear are both limmer boots, a pair of the heavyweight standards and a pair of the lightweights.  factory-made in germany, not custom.  only sold from their store in new hampshire; i traced an outline of my foot, measured the circumference at various points, and sent the stats to them; they sent the right size.  i liked the standards so much that i picked up the lightweights a year later.  both boots have a hard leather inner sole, but no separate/removable insole. 

i don't use aftermarket insoles.  my feet are flat, very little arch.  about ten years ago, i went to a podiatrist, got a plaster cast of my foot, and started using custom orthotics (langer sporthotics).  i wear them in every pair of boots and shoes i own except water shoes.

i also use a light pair of trail runners, the treksta evolution, a relatively new purchase.  stores on the east coast don't carry them.  i bought the low gore tex version without trying them on, worked out the size and made some educated guesses about how they would fit via phone calls to stores that sell them.  read every review i could find, which generally made it clear that the toe box was probably wide enough for my wide feet.  they are pretty light weight and have (gasp) EVA midsoles - but virtually every shoe at this price point uses EVA.  if you go more expensive, you will get heavier, more durable "PU" (polyurethane) midsoles.  i don't care.  they fit great, and they are very comfortable on my feet.  pretty durable, considering how light they are.  the insole is moderately better than the typical cheap insole.  as with the limmers, i quickly figured out that the shoe fits my feet well, so i found a pair of the non gore-tex shoes on the geartrade website, basically new shoes that had been returned in a damaged box & couldn't be sold retail, for half price. 

10:10 p.m. on July 11, 2011 (EDT)
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leadbelly,

do you use the custom ensoles in your limmers?

8:41 a.m. on July 20, 2011 (EDT)
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I use the Montrail heat-moldable Enduro insoles in all of my hiking and running footwear:

5:46 p.m. on July 20, 2011 (EDT)
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Alicia, I was actually considering those. So they get a thumbs up from ya? Pretty dumb question on 2nd thought. If ya didn't like them they wouldn't be in all of your hiking n running fw. Duh.

6:11 p.m. on July 20, 2011 (EDT)
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Rick-Pittsburgh said:

Alicia, I was actually considering those. So they get a thumbs up from ya? Pretty dumb question on 2nd thought. If ya didn't like them they wouldn't be in all of your hiking n running fw. Duh.

 Rick I've been useing superfeet in my shoe's but Alicia is 100% corect the montrails are the BOMB!!! Considering I lived  near and knew the person who invented orthopedic insurts. I know Alicia probably has read their name or a book by them since she is a runner? You probably as well. I knew them my whole life where I grew up in NJ. They lived in the same town and yes I ran against them. LOL they also supported my highschool Xteam in watching us compete.

6:22 p.m. on July 20, 2011 (EDT)
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Interesting. Thanks for the heads up Denis. I have SF greens, as well as Sole insoles. I think I am gonna give the Montrails a whirl. I have heard them mentioned a few times and the feedback was pretty good.

1:38 p.m. on July 21, 2011 (EDT)
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Yes, I do like the Montrail insoles.

Full disclosure: I got an initial sample pair at Outdoor Retailer one year when they were introduced. They worked well for me and so I bought more and now I use them in pretty much all of my running or hiking shoes.

I did not do any great comparison of the Montrails versus Superfeet, etc. though. Basically the Montrails work for me, so I don't mess around and change them.

3:33 p.m. on August 8, 2011 (EDT)
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Dewey said:

Much of that has to do with FIT and I have found that very few gear store clerks really KNOW how to fit a boot correctly. I do and have trained a number of others and will say that, IF, you buy a GOOD, leather boot correctly fitted to YOUR feet and break it in properly, you will not require insoles other than simple leather ones and good sox.

I prefer my boots to be of FGL, 8-9" high and built to withstand scree and water and give support when  descending under a heavy-75 lbs.+ pack and such  boots really do not require replacement footbeds for most people's feet.

 Not shure I can agree with the statement about not needing after market insoles if boot is fitted correctly.This is because of the wide differance in arch height and depth between so many peoples feet.No boot maker covers all these well.The higher quality heat moldable insoles will give a custom fit to any foot regardless of odly shaped or not.Have owned many fgl boots over my 45 years of climbing and hiking and have always enjoyed better insoles once I became willing to try the better ones.ymmv

3:52 p.m. on August 9, 2011 (EDT)
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Can you switch the Montrails from boot to boot, or do they get cut specifically to one boot?  It gets expensive to have multiple insoles for each pair of boots.

6:23 p.m. on August 9, 2011 (EDT)
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Fitting the arch is an integral aspect of correctly fitting the entire boot to the individual's feet and one does not "need" an insole to do this. You CAN use them, I tend to dislike them as they seem to slowly flatten with time/use and then the fit is awry, whether you have them or not.

If, you prefer lighter, cheaper boots with moldable insoles, fine, but, I fit my FGL boots without them and prefer this and will not buy another pair of insoles. I also have had many boots since my first Pierre Paris and Sons, handmade boots from Vancouver, BC, which I got 50 years ago, this past spring and I just find such "hooves" work best for me, each to his own.

7:32 p.m. on August 9, 2011 (EDT)
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I use felt in my pacs, but no insoles in my FGL boots. I tried to force a pair of FGL boots to fit by adding insoles and it was a painful experience. In my case, I need good fit in the arch and that seems to come from the original boot last, soft insoles just don't do it.

So I wear the actual maker's insole, usually just hard leather with the stitching to the midsole showing through, and find it quite comfortable.

R2, if you want more durable and thicker felt, try the felt soles sold for replacements on wading boots. Those are tough.

7:32 a.m. on August 10, 2011 (EDT)
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overmywaders said:

R2, if you want more durable and thicker felt, try the felt soles sold for replacements on wading boots. Those are tough.

 

Good tip. Thanks.

I've had trouble finding them.   I like the LaCrosse brand.

I've been trying the thicker felt insoles out of my Sorel Pac-Boots, as they compress down with use.   However; they are dimensionally larger (length and width), and I don't want to trim (cut) them too much ... as they will not fit well when I put them back in the Pac-Boots.

Felt insoles will "fluff back up", somewhat ... if you wash them carefully (not in the washing machine), and allow them to air dry.

                                                       ~r2~

9:35 a.m. on August 10, 2011 (EDT)
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I just got new FGL Alico Tahoes, which I am loving- However, the insole in them wasn't working for me. So before I got started on really breaking them in heavily, I wanted to get settled with new insoles.  

I tried Superfeet, and was not impressed at all.

About a week ago I went and looked at all the insoles I could get my hands on and acuallty inspect and feel. I wanted something that provided some heel and arch support while also providing some cushioning along the length of the footbed. I settles on Danner replacement insoles. Ironically, I can't stand Danner boots, they simply do not fit my feet. But after a week of wearing the insoles in my Alicos, I am very happy.  

2:02 p.m. on August 14, 2011 (EDT)
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Dewey said:

Fitting the arch is an integral aspect of correctly fitting the entire boot to the individual's feet and one does not "need" an insole to do this. You CAN use them, I tend to dislike them as they seem to slowly flatten with time/use and then the fit is awry, whether you have them or not.

If, you prefer lighter, cheaper boots with moldable insoles, fine, but, I fit my FGL boots without them and prefer this and will not buy another pair of insoles. I also have had many boots since my first Pierre Paris and Sons, handmade boots from Vancouver, BC, which I got 50 years ago, this past spring and I just find such "hooves" work best for me, each to his own.

 Dewey I am not trying to be argumentative with you but the vast majority of us do not have hand made custom boots.If you have a generic foot shape chances are a production last will work well and with the addition of a custom fitted insole a great fit can be achieved.Had Galibier Super Guides that I did alpine climbing in for almost 25 years so I can tell you from personnel experience that you can get long life out of many brands of boots,these were fgl hand made boots but not custom.Many of the newer boots do not last as long but are much lighter and require little or no break in right out of the box.I am not saying that my views are gospel nor the only way to look at boots but just that there is more than one way to approach any aspect of outdoor gear.ymmv

5:04 p.m. on August 15, 2011 (EDT)
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I always check out REI firstly and then the Cahart store and another like it.

REI nearly always its the spot and they have a good selection of inner soles too.

12:32 p.m. on August 19, 2011 (EDT)
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The Paris boots I mentioned were, as all good boots are, hand or benchmade, however, they were standard work boots, not custom built for me. I actually got them "second hand" as we were far too "poor" for we kids to gat anything beyond the bare necessities of life. I have had two pairs of custom boots in my life and am not satisfied with either and I prefer to fit my own boots and have done so for decades.

I also used Galibier Super Guides, some 40ish years ago, but, the toe box never really suited me. I have a pair of Galibier Vercours I found here and am saving these for when my Kastingers, customs and whatnot are finally wornout.

Sure, you CAN fit boots with insoles, as I have said, but, a proper fit can be obtained without them and I prefer that. YMMV.

4:26 p.m. on November 7, 2011 (EST)
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Forgive the rehashing of an old thread….but just where do you find a good boot fitter? The type of folks (that I’ve encountered so far at least) that work in the outdoor stores near me are woefully lacking in knowledge and experience regarding most of the products they sell.

However, most of the products I’m interested in (based on internet research, I guess) are only sold at such places.

12:03 a.m. on November 8, 2011 (EST)
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My feet, luckily are not too different to the average foot so I choose shoes carefully and ones that already have good insoles.  Then the shoes usually get worn out before the insole wears out.

12:54 p.m. on November 8, 2011 (EST)
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unfortunately, i think you have to go to the source for a good boot fitter these days.  lacking that, try a good, small specialty hiking store - they are more likely to have the expertise. 

if you happen to be near north conway, NH or Estes Park, CO, there are some specific people you could approach. 

2:22 p.m. on November 8, 2011 (EST)
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Patman said:

...but just where do you find a good boot fitter? The type of folks (that I’ve encountered so far at least) that work in the outdoor stores near me are woefully lacking in knowledge and experience regarding most of the products they sell.

 I am with you one this one. The kids that most often work at our only real outdoor store are almost always horridly inexperienced yet think they have the knowledge and wisdom of Hillary, Messner, and the OGBO combined. 

4:04 p.m. on November 8, 2011 (EST)
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Before Deciding on buying many pair's of boots I had the same question. I think you have to fly/go/drive to where the good boot fitters are. One such person is Dave Page in Seattle http://www.davepagecobbler.com/. It sucks that the true boot fitter/cobbler is a dying art, but, every time one of us buys a mass produced pair of throw away boots designed to satiate the Wal-Mart crowd mentality, we inadvertently help in the extinction of the true boot fitter/cobbler. There are not many left and I do not hear that yopung people are clamoring to go to Cobbler collage.

There was a guy in Denver named Bob Rose that I worked with for years. If he can be found he is good.

5:52 p.m. on November 8, 2011 (EST)
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gonzan said:

Patman said:

...but just where do you find a good boot fitter? The type of folks (that I’ve encountered so far at least) that work in the outdoor stores near me are woefully lacking in knowledge and experience regarding most of the products they sell.

 I am with you one this one. The kids that most often work at our only real outdoor store are almost always horridly inexperienced yet think they have the knowledge and wisdom of Hillary, Messner, and the OGBO combined. 

 Boy!  Ain't that the truth! In my final job before retiring at 55, back in 2001, I worked for a large, new Vancouver area gear shop. When, we opened the store, to that point the largest ever in BC, almost all the staff were 18-30, many were from other countries and most were city kids. BUT, hey, man, they KNEW gear and "some old guy" as I was called by a couple, could not possibly have this obviously arcane and "kewl" knowledge.

After, I had assisted the manager, assistant manager and department manager in fitting boots to demanding customers for 3-4 days, one of the 19 yr. olds, told me, "hey, man, you sure know boots, eh" and I soon was teaching the others on staff how to fit mountain boots correctly.

Yet, when I asked for a raise, there was a delay and it was obvious that some "old dude, man", like me was so desperate for a job, any job, that they could just rattle my chain and I would still come to work.

At, this point, the Canadian Coast Guard, offered me a lightstation on "the Charlottes" and I decided that selling gear to mostly urbanites was not for me. My wife then said that I should just retire and I thought it over for a week and decided that she was right.....funny, the younger they were, the more they knew........( geez, do you suppose any of US were that way????? grins here)

August 27, 2014
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