Do you bring your Ipod with you on camping/hiking trips?

6:36 p.m. on July 4, 2011 (EDT)
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Just wondering if anybody does. I always do and usually bring some of those recharging modules you can get off Ebay or Amazon. Although I was wondering about those solar chargers. Saw them at a demo at my local Costco. Their expensive ($100.00) but not sure if they work or not in real wilderness conditions.

Plus what do you listen to? Music mix, books, podcasts?

6:46 p.m. on July 4, 2011 (EDT)
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I personally do not. Nor do I bring a radio of any type. I can get weather updates on my smartphone. The whole reason I go out is to get away from it all. I much rather be tuned in with nature, the sounds that are associated with are all the music I need.

With a set of ear buds jammed in my ear I wouldn't have noticed alot of the things that I have been lucky enough to see while on my journeys throughout the years.

Not to mention sound can play a great benefit in ones own personal safety.

7:46 p.m. on July 4, 2011 (EDT)
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Rick-Pittsburgh said:

I personally do not. Nor do I bring a radio of any type. I can get weather updates on my smartphone. The whole reason I go out is to get away from it all. I much rather be tuned in with nature and the sounds that are associated with are all the music I need.

With a set of ear buds jammed in my ear I wouldn't have noticed alot of the things that I have been lucky enough to see.

Not to mention sound can play a great benefit in ones own personal safety.

 

...  Amen, 'Bro ....   ( x2 ).

________________________

 ~r2~

7:56 p.m. on July 4, 2011 (EDT)
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buffdaddy said:

Just wondering if anybody does. I always do and usually bring some of those recharging modules you can get off Ebay or Amazon. Although I was wondering about those solar chargers. Saw them at a demo at my local Costco. Their expensive ($100.00) but not sure if they work or not in real wilderness conditions.

Plus what do you listen to? Music mix, books, podcasts?

 As far as charging goes solar works well, when the sun is out. I have used solar in the past but have switched to another type of unit. It all depends on how long I am gonna be out. Anything over 1.5-2 weeks and I go solar.

As far as that $100 price tag. That isn't alot considering what else is out there.

8:40 p.m. on July 4, 2011 (EDT)
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 Don't get me wrong, one of the reasons of being out in the wilderness is to enjoy the sounds of nature. But when your hiking and tired and that pack feels like it has 50lb weights in it, it's a good pick me up to crank up some Sabbath or Metallica. Plus I like to listen to a good book while sleeping, especially when the weather is not agreeing.

I usually leave the smartphone at home and use a cheap motorola razor (just swap out the sim cards). 

9:03 p.m. on July 4, 2011 (EDT)
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The purpose of me taking a smartphone is the apps. I have a whole slew of backing apps(gps, weather updates n notices, etc.) Plus I have Pandora(sat radio) on it if I really want to go that route not to mention Kindle.

I from experience(especially in the winter) like being tuned in to what is going on around me. Like I said sound can save your tail at times. At the same time I also can understand and respect your opinions as well.

When I get tired knowing that stopping is not gonna get me where I need to be is usually enough driving force for me. Not too mention the lure of what is around that next corner.

10:23 p.m. on July 4, 2011 (EDT)
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I don't own a portable device.  Years ago when I had a walkman, I never used it.  I don't like to be outside and cut off.  I prefer it when inside or in a car, but not outside.  Big big fan of listening to the wind and the trees.  I don't even like to have a radio playing when I'm painting the outside of a house or working on an exterior.  I always think it is a good idea until I'm doing it.  I quickly shut it off and put it away.

And I'm a ravenous music nut.  I have tens of thousands (no exaggeration) of LPs, CDs, cassettes, and live recordings; spend 95% of my freetime listening to music.  Music is my passion and obsession.  But I never ever miss it when I'm in the outdoors.  I forget about it as I'm taking that first step down a trail.

11:05 p.m. on July 4, 2011 (EDT)
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Generally speaking I prefer not to. I like listening to the natural world around me, you can learn a lot by doing so. Sometimes you learn things and don't realize it until later.

In order to blend in and be in tune with nature I like to listen and be alert to all the sounds around me. After a while you start to notice subtle changes in sound and learn what it means.

There are however times when I enjoy listening to classical music or native music, or just some good bluegrass. I like to listen sometimes when I'm wade fishing river canyons or maybe sitting on a rock for a bit just to relax.

I do think sometimes people new to the outdoors cling to their radios, I pods, etc just because their electronics are a part of their everyday life and they do not yet understand that nature has a music all its own that is very intricate and speaks to you if you listen.

Electronics can be a benefit in the backcountry if used properly and minimally IMO, but bringing them so you can stay socially connected or entertained for long periods is a waste of time when it could be spent learning so much about the world around you.

Again, nothing against minimal use, I do it too.

4:10 a.m. on July 5, 2011 (EDT)
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The only  eletronic  things I bring with me are  my cell phone, a two way radio to the outside world,  (you are not aloud to call me, it's for me to call you, ...................note, I got my first ever cell phone 6 months ago), and my zune................. how did we ever make it thru the wild west, or the world in general,  with out cell phones or good music?  roger,roger, send help, we'r nindy [90]  clicks past the second out croppen on the left, where they hung the witches after the last plauge during the badger roundup of nintdy thwree ...............were bing attact.......by them local folk (indians)............help....were a wagon train of mostly woman and children help...............please send a regement or two, rodger, (note these are people who had no schooling so they could not spell, ...huh, well there texting of cource), can you send help........ 

Yep, after I've humped 30-50 lbs. of stuff up the hill I, bring my cell to save my butt (in the rare cases my butt needs saving,...... hasen't yet), if I really screw up, or yet, just brake my ankle, and I bring my zune.................yes my Zune.   I bring my Zune to help me hump my stuff the rest way up the hill (a little Dire Straits just seams to get my butt in gear).  Some times I need that little motivation to make it the last mile.   I think the important thing for me is not getting away from the electronics, but how the eletronics connect me to the rest of the world. 

I was fishing next to a guy one time who had a salmon on, no big deal as they were just chum salmon, ( I had one one as well) and this guy answered his phone............. with a salmon on.......he actually answered his phone with a fish on...........he then had a conversation,........... with a salmon on...........  sigh ...........(dont' make me sigh even more).   My day was done,  runied,  I tell you, runied............. I could hear it now (hun, after your done catching that "thing" would you pic up some bell peppers and spinach or some other leafy greens...........sigh)..........or wait, was he up dating his face book page.  I caught my salmon and left.  I learned a valuble lesson that day.  Thoe, It made me angry that day that I had to listen to him have a conversation on a cell phone w/ a fish on,  I relized that that was his "outdoor" experiance not mine.  It did conviced  me however  to wait still 8 more years to get a cell phone.  I still only use it to call out..............

 

I reliaze that everyone has their own experiances in the outback.  But it does seem to me that the idea is to get away in the backcountry (outback).  If you bring your electronic gear thats cool.  The whole idea, to me, is to get away form the inner city life and have no connections, but that's just me.

10:31 a.m. on July 5, 2011 (EDT)
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Every so often I will take my 4 gig player along to listen to books before bed. I only use one of the ear buds so I can still hear what is going on outside the tent, and I only use it right before falling asleep. My mp3 player weighs a fraction of what a book does, that is the only reason I bring it.

3:13 p.m. on July 5, 2011 (EDT)
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i don't on trips of any length, but i do take an ipod nano or shuffle sometimes when i go on weekend trail runs.  i put together different playlists periodically to keep things fresh - the kind of music varies.  last weekend was heavy on the Who, Live at Leeds; a hair metal band called Firehouse; and June Christy's "Something Cool" (female jazz vocalist) for a change of pace. 

because i don't take the music player on overnights, i can't help with the solar charger question.  like many, the opportunity to completely unplug is one of the benefits (for me) of hiking and sleeping out. 

3:33 p.m. on July 5, 2011 (EDT)
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I leave the cell & the ipod in the truck. This is my time to get away from all the clutter & noise. I need the peace & calm when I can make my break away from the buzz.

7:33 a.m. on July 6, 2011 (EDT)
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Message from the future:

Gadgets!  I don't know how any of you Y2K millennial types ever got by without supersonavision.

Unplug, and unwind.  My group brings good old fashion books and musical instruments for evenings camp side.

Ed

7:34 p.m. on July 6, 2011 (EDT)
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Ipod? Never. I'm in the same boat as apeman, I bring my ZUNE! :D it helps me get to sleep easier, especially during rain or snow storms. I usually listen to my recorded radio broadcasts of The Phil Hendrie show until I fall asleep. Talk radio completely cured my Insomnia.

7:38 p.m. on July 6, 2011 (EDT)
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Point taken, just with my smartphone (HTC EVO) the battery only lasts a couple of hours. I have an extended battery but that only last a couple of hours longer.

7:40 p.m. on July 6, 2011 (EDT)
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Ahh Live at Leeds one of the most underrated live albums ever!

7:46 p.m. on July 6, 2011 (EDT)
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whomeworry said:

Message from the future:

Gadgets!  I don't know how any of you Y2K millennial types ever got by without supersonavision.

Unplug, and unwind.  My group brings good old fashion books and musical instruments for evenings camp side.

Ed

 

I work for one of largest mass market book distributers in the country and get and read tons of books. Kindles, Nooks and all the other tablets are just killing us. I also have been playing guitar for over 20 years and bring along a cheap imitation of a Martin Backpacker guitaron camping trips. Plus I was born in the 70's so I'm a gen X'er. Not trying to be sarcastic but I wish I was that young.

7:52 p.m. on July 6, 2011 (EDT)
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I guess I am odd. I don't bring literature except for a map and don't listen to music except for what is around me. I guess I just look at it like I can do that at home.

9:59 p.m. on July 6, 2011 (EDT)
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Ive got a little Grundig Mini400 radio I always bring along. Never listen to it while hiking, I cant stand earbuds! But do enjoy some music after diner while relaxing before bed. The cell phone always comes along for emergency use only, its turned off as soon as i get to TH. Gets turned back on after I return to the TH just to let folks kno Im still alive.

Brought a book a few times but found out I prefer them for fire starter over reading. I am however planning on bringing a book on my upcoming trip which is gonna be more of a slower pace relaxing wonder the woods kinda thing. Guess I could burn each chapter as I go :)

7:18 a.m. on July 9, 2011 (EDT)
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i can actually say Yes I have brought my MP3 player with me on my trek..2000 plus miles at times you need a little boost to keep you going. In Tennesee I was playing country music and Santana. Thru shenandoah Clapton the Stones and The WHO..Now granted Iam up north but I have a  book with me as well and a journal. My 3G phone with apps...because work has now contacted me 3 times for some decisions they need answered. I have to " now" beable to access my files at work..That part" sucks"...

10:35 a.m. on July 9, 2011 (EDT)
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It has never crossed my mind to actually use one while hiking.  Because of bear and cougar in the area, I wouln't think it advisable.  

4:41 p.m. on July 11, 2011 (EDT)
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I just got a solar battery charging device on Steep and Cheap for 25 bux. I intend to use it on my Everest Trek to charge iPhone for blogging the trek.  I ahve LOVED steep and cheap for good gear prices. Key is to know what you want and have time to wait for it to show up.

 

As far as iPod on trail...I just don't get it.

8:45 p.m. on July 11, 2011 (EDT)
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@giftogab

Have you discovered sacalerts.com and geartrade.com?

10:33 p.m. on July 11, 2011 (EDT)
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When I was a teenager, I spent a summer backpacking around the White Mountains in NH.  I carried a little transistor radio, and listened to it in my tent at night (iPods weren't even yet a twinkle in Steve Jobs' eye at that time).

These days I prefer to hear the sounds of the world around me - and in fact that's one reason I'm out there.  I do carry my iPhone with me, but only because the trip to/from the mountains is 7-10 hours (or more), and I want to have it with me for that part of the trip.  I don't leave it in the vehicle because of the potential for break-ins and theft.

I could see where, if I were a through-hiker on the AT or PCT, there'd be times when I'd enjoy a break from the sounds of the wild and might enjoy some music :) ... but for shorter trips, no way...

10:59 p.m. on July 11, 2011 (EDT)
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I have not, but thanks to you I will be looking it over right now!

8:57 a.m. on July 12, 2011 (EDT)
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Totally agree with Rick and Trout on this.  Why bring an iPod when nature has so many "tunes" and sounds to listen to?  Afterall isn't part of getting out to take in all that nature has to offer and get away from the everyday electronic leash that our world/society has given us?  Well, I think so.

Also, if you have your earbuds in jamming to some tune, are you going to be aware if you sneak up on a bear off to your side?  Who knows what?  Listening to the sounds around you tell you a lot about what is going on...once you get to know them and understand what they mean.

1:28 p.m. on July 12, 2011 (EDT)
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Personally I do not bring anything like a radio,Ipod or music device to the backcountry. I see a lot of people wearing them and wonder why. Isn't the sound of nature good enough? I like the sound of the wind,rivers and creeks,birds,lizards rustling in the leaves,rattlesnakes, locust/cicada's,frogs croaking and the sound a big bear makes when he is chasing me down for a snack!

Leave your Ipod at home!

4:51 p.m. on July 12, 2011 (EDT)
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I bring a PMP (for you, r2) with me, and let me tell you why you should consider one...

I usually bring a pad of paper/pencil with me on every trip, to journal, take notes on gear/routes/weather, etc. I found myself not using it as often as I wanted to because it's sometimes a pain in the ass to stop, get it out, and spend the time writing down a legible note. I would then get to camp, and try to recall all the things I noted in my head earlier in the day. Didn't work very well.

I bring a Cowon C2 now mainly because of it's high-quality voice recording feature. I can pull this thing out while walking, and record as detailed of a note as I wish...while still walking. My notes are more thorough, and the whole note-taking process is much simplified. Also, the C2 pulls in radio stations (AM/FM) fairly well, enabling me to get weather reports in real-time when I have reception.

It weighs less than a pad/pencil, and takes up less space. 55 hours of recording on a full charge.

Of course, it also hols a gaggle of songs, videos, audio books, and e-books. Since I also usually bring a paperback for reading anyways, this device can save me even more weight and space.

Developing and maintaining an appreciation/awareness of nature is completely independent of the things you carry. Sure those things can be distracting, but that's on you buddy...if you're bashing those whose bring PMPs along into the backcountry, perhaps you'd do well asking yourself why you're not comfortable with it?

5:34 p.m. on July 12, 2011 (EDT)
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pillowthread said:

Developing and maintaining an appreciation/awareness of nature is completely independent of the things you carry. Sure those things can be distracting, but that's on you buddy...if you're bashing those whose bring PMPs along into the backcountry, perhaps you'd do well asking yourself why you're not comfortable with it?

 I don't necessarily see anyone being bashed, although maybe I am missing something.

The topic was "Do you bring your Ipod with you on camping/hiking trips?"

Pretty simple and straight forward.

I have a few friends that are very "experienced" climbers and backcountry boarders. They like the fluffy untouched stuff. Now the territories that they frequent are areas that have high avalanche possibility as well as a ton of other things that can happen. If you have an Ipod jammed in your ear you may not be as likely to hear ice crack or when the hillside behind you gives out when you are on the downhill because you are not gonna see it because? You are going downhill and all the fun stuff is going on behind you.... but don't worry, Ted Nugent will save you.

I just think it is better to optimize your chances of survival as opposed to having less time to deal with it because you weren't totally focussed on what was going on around you because of your favorite tune was on and ya turned it up. In situations like this seconds can be the deciding factor of whether you come off the mountain breathing or in a bag. Then again it is all dependent on where you are. For your typical spring, summer, fall, hike I don't see where it could be a problem. Then again there are these overhanging rock thingies that periodically erode and crash. I guess you wouldn't hear that when jamming out to AC/DC. Picture a fly on a windsheild.

Things happen. Like I said in another thread, people get jacked up all the time because they forgot where they were. Things can happen when ya least expect it. I am sure with you being a Ranger you know exactly what type of scenarios I am referring too.

I really can't figure out where you are coming from with the last statement.

"if you're bashing those whose bring PMPs along into the backcountry, perhaps you'd do well asking yourself why you're not comfortable with it?"

 Then again maybe I clarified why I am not comfortable with it. I am not sure who your statement was directed too but being this is a discussion I figured I would chime in.

6:18 p.m. on July 12, 2011 (EDT)
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No worries, Rick. My last statement wasn't directed at you, nor anyone...that's why I started with "if". I'd call you out if I took issue with something you wrote.

That being said, in this thread I do perceive an air of condescension and perhaps even intolerance towards those who carry PMPs into the backcountry. Surely some people personally hold views more precise than they feel comfortable expressing on this website. I am sorry my post got you agitated or confused, Rick.

In addition, we share the same views regarding the effects that wearing earbuds has on one's ability to perceive outside stimuli. It might not be wise to be blasting The Nuge while descending The Grand on skis...then again, I wouldn't try telling that to Mark Twight...

6:22 p.m. on July 12, 2011 (EDT)
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I use to jam on the slopes and ended up getting "T-boned by an 11yr old on a kamikaze mission." I ended up with 2 broken ribs and a broken collar bone. Man that sucked. Never used the buds on the slope since.

I actually like going back and forth on subjects like this. Sometimes it has a tendency to open my eyes to new things. I will be the first to put out there that I do not have a clue what I am doing 99% of the time. I just know how to fake it well.

On the confused thing well, I am confused all the time. It does make things interesting. You have no idea how many new ways I have learned to tie my shoes on accident then again it can take quite some time for me to untie them.

No worries I am not agitated in the least. Also if we ever cross paths can I possibly borrow your PMP ? :)

7:33 p.m. on July 12, 2011 (EDT)
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iphone everywhere I go. don't use it for phone or being on the grid or for music while on a trail. I use it for the great gps apps, the GoSky watch app to map stars with my kids, plant and bird reference, and for camera and video. I do have a Solaris 6 and Sync battery system from Brunton that keeps the charge up for as long as I want.

I can use it to read a book I've downloaded if the weather keeps me in my tent for hours on end (not very common in SoCal).

10:53 p.m. on July 12, 2011 (EDT)
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XterroBrando, I did say earlier that I carry my iPhone only because I don't want to leave it in my vehicle at the trailhead.  What I really meant to say was "I would love to use it for the GPS & other "outdoors" apps, but don't becuase the battery life is so bad, but I carry it anyway to avoid leaving it..."

I'll have to read up on the "Solaris 6", thanks for the tip.  I wonder how it would work to drape the solar charger on the outside of one's pack while on summer hikes in the Sierra ...

Meanwhile, my DeLorme PN-60w is great, but after using the iPhone, the tiny screen is hard to take ...  then again the PN-60w outlives the iPhone battery life by a long shot...

 

10:10 a.m. on July 13, 2011 (EDT)
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I usually have my MP3 player/tiny speaker in my pack but only really use it when I do a 1 or 2 night solo trip with some booze. I don't use it much, but after putting a few back some tunes are nice, escpecially hearing the ones that got stuck in my head.

In groups or camping at shelters I discourage it. Everyone has different tastes in music and most don't want to hear it while camping. So I respect that. Nothing is more annoying to me than someone with a guitar or even worse a harmonica at a shelter and just keeps going on and on. I don't want to hear it! And many others don't either, but some just don't care what you think. I won't be that jerk. But i have blasted some death metal once on my MP3 player to make a point to someone who didn't get that I didn't like or want to hear his guitar playing.

12:44 p.m. on July 13, 2011 (EDT)
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...Maybe I could strap a "Ghetto Balster" to my pack next time I go out. I wonder if I should bring 8 extra D-cell batteries.


ghetto-blaster.jpg
...maybe I could run karaoake at the shelter sites.... now if I could only talk someone into bringing a Marshall Half-Stack... Any takers?

1:13 p.m. on July 13, 2011 (EDT)
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Rick-Pittsburgh said:

...Maybe I could strap a "Ghetto Balster" to my pack next time I go out. I wonder if I should bring 8 extra D-cell batteries.


ghetto-blaster.jpg
...maybe I could run karaoake at the shelter sites.... now if I could only talk someone into bringing a Marshall Half-Stack... Any takers?

 I'll bring the Music Nation tapes and we can all pass the Dutchie around the box!

1:18 p.m. on July 13, 2011 (EDT)
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no

1:19 p.m. on July 13, 2011 (EDT)
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can't hear the birds, bees, bears or other wonders if I had a pair of earbuds jammed in my ears

2:35 p.m. on July 13, 2011 (EDT)
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On busy trails, for the first mile or so from the TH, I leave the music player at home but just wear the earbuds when I solo so people won't feel the need to stop and tell how far it is to the next whatever is ahead. 

6:06 p.m. on July 13, 2011 (EDT)
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Bkuti said:

Rick-Pittsburgh said:

...Maybe I could strap a "Ghetto Balster" to my pack next time I go out. I wonder if I should bring 8 extra D-cell batteries.


ghetto-blaster.jpg
...maybe I could run karaoake at the shelter sites.... now if I could only talk someone into bringing a Marshall Half-Stack... Any takers?

 I'll bring the Music Nation tapes and we can all pass the Dutchie around the box!

Pass the Dutchie? That is funny!

6:20 p.m. on July 13, 2011 (EDT)
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bheiser1 said:

XterroBrando, I did say earlier that I carry my iPhone only because I don't want to leave it in my vehicle at the trailhead.  What I really meant to say was "I would love to use it for the GPS & other "outdoors" apps, but don't becuase the battery life is so bad, but I carry it anyway to avoid leaving it..."

I'll have to read up on the "Solaris 6", thanks for the tip.  I wonder how it would work to drape the solar charger on the outside of one's pack while on summer hikes in the Sierra ...

Meanwhile, my DeLorme PN-60w is great, but after using the iPhone, the tiny screen is hard to take ...  then again the PN-60w outlives the iPhone battery life by a long shot...

 

Bheiser1, the solaris 6 works very well strapped to the outside of the pack, but not in a straight link to the iphone - as it needs a perfectly smooth delivery of currrent to charge quickly. Other electronics and phones do not have the same problem. It will charge, but very slowly. it can work better if you use a car charger with it's provided car-charger connector.

My Sync, however, has proven excellent for providing a fast, clean charge. Plus I can charge a dead iphone 7 times before the sync needs to be replenished. A great combo, but not that light weight at 12.5 oz for the sync and 5 oz for the Solaris (7.2 if you take all of the different connectors with you). You may want to look into the Inspire, which is like the sync but smaller in size and weight (5.5 oz), but also with less capacity (3200 mAh vs 9000 mAh). I like the sync better because I can pack the battery in my pack's top pocket, connected to the solar panel strapped to the back, and attach the charging pod to my shoulder strap. I can plug the iphone into it at any time, without stopping on the trail. I may buy the Inspire for short overnight trips.  

6:24 p.m. on July 13, 2011 (EDT)
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Nice Rick! Very funny! My 11 year asked about the "Dutchie". It was one of those conversations...

7:24 p.m. on July 13, 2011 (EDT)
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I may have sounded a bit pompos. I am sorry for that....My reaction to the question was...I don't get it.....I get it a little more now. I do bring my iPhone for maping the trail. But I am always afraid of not listening to what is around me. Heck, even out walking in the neighborhood I find that the earbuds, while nice to hear the great tunes, obscure the sound of Johnny squealing around the corner. But then, I am old and we didn't have all this when I was a youngster.  My 8 tracks would have been too heavy to carry anyway. But I did get a solar charging thingy to take to Everest and am testing it to see if it will work. I want to blog daily at the end of each leg of the trek.

9:33 p.m. on July 13, 2011 (EDT)
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Hmmm I have never brought my Ipod before but I am considering bringing it on my next week long. I agree with people about wearing it while hiking, or where other dangers could be/are present. That said, I could see myself putting it on for 15, 20 minutes before bed while relaxing in my tent. A little jazz before bedtime never hurt anyone.

10:17 p.m. on July 13, 2011 (EDT)
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Wait a sec, I said Ghetto Balster? Uhhhhhh... Wow.

12:17 p.m. on July 14, 2011 (EDT)
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Yea I said Dutchie. Umm, yea it's a cigar :)

Anyone remember that 80's reggae song from Musical Youth called "Pass the Dutchie"....on the left hand side....HEY

12:25 p.m. on July 14, 2011 (EDT)
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Bkuti said:

Yea I said Dutchie. Umm, yea it's a cigar :)

Anyone remember that 80's reggae song from Musical Youth called "Pass the Dutchie"....on the left hand side....HEY

 "You be Illin." :) I noticed Adidas has a few boots coming out or currently available(can't remember all the details.) Maybe I can snag up a pair, drop the laces, snag up an Adidas windsuit, a Kangol, some bling, and hit the AT. Wonder what kinda trail name I could get with that attire.... Hmmmm...

12:35 p.m. on July 14, 2011 (EDT)
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Rick-Pittsburgh said:

Bkuti said:

Yea I said Dutchie. Umm, yea it's a cigar :)

Anyone remember that 80's reggae song from Musical Youth called "Pass the Dutchie"....on the left hand side....HEY

 "You be Illin." :) I noticed Adidas has a few boots either out or coming out or currently available(can't remember all the details.) Maybe I can snag up a pair, drop the laces, snag up an Adidas windsuit, a Kangol, some bling, and hit the AT. Wonder what kinda trail name I could get with that attire.... Hmmmm...

 You'd be "Da King" on the AT! You'd have all my respect. I'd even carry the Ghetto blaster (and batteries) for you, cranked to 10. You just hike with style!

1:39 p.m. on July 14, 2011 (EDT)
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New trend in the thru-hiking community: the "Character-Thru"

Usage:

Thru-hiker 1: "Hey, did you see Rick? He's a couple huts behind..."

Thru-hiker 2: "Yeah! He's Character-Thruing as a B-boy!"

Thru-hiker 1: "Inspirational! I'm going as Vash The Stampede next year..."


...actually I'm not sure how much of trend it is...dare I say I just coined the term?

1:53 p.m. on July 14, 2011 (EDT)
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and I would happily provide my finest rain cover for the Ghetto Blaster! I think We could keep the blaster running for an entire thru-hike of the AT if I daisy chained 25 Solaris Solar Chargers and we carried them in a line like a Chinese Parade dragon...

2:03 p.m. on July 14, 2011 (EDT)
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If I see someone in a Barney suit on the AT I am gonna lose it. pillowthread, maybe we can start a new forum thread titled "Character-Thru." I bet the responses would be quite comical to say the least. I wonder, would a thread like this be under "gear selection?"

A sumo suit may be great in the winter. :p

2:12 p.m. on July 14, 2011 (EDT)
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I really like where this is going...

6:08 p.m. on July 14, 2011 (EDT)
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pillowthread said:

I really like where this is going...

 me too! It's going in the direction of the trailhead sign reading "Walk this Way" (cue music).

I'm calling my shot now: first "Character-thru" sighting will be REI GUY. Description to follow.

9:29 p.m. on July 14, 2011 (EDT)
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Character-thru reminds of the AT through hiker with the trail name "Santa Claus." He started in a Santa Claus Suit and ended his trip in it.

9:39 p.m. on July 14, 2011 (EDT)
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I guess I got dibs on the whole B-Boy character. Does this mean I should look into getting my pack hooked up with chrome accents?

12:12 a.m. on July 16, 2011 (EDT)
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being a truck driver, I say lotsa chrome and lights is a must!

12:20 a.m. on July 16, 2011 (EDT)
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I have a CDL so hey why not lol.

1:32 a.m. on July 16, 2011 (EDT)
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Rick you need to get the string lights and 2 nine volts and your getup..Would be cool if you did!!!!

12:08 p.m. on July 16, 2011 (EDT)
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Could you see me night hiking? Id look like a christmas tree. Lol.

3:07 p.m. on July 16, 2011 (EDT)
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I actually bring small, 2 dbl A battery string lights with me for inside my tent and a lil ambiance outside. Got clear and muti color. They can be strapped all over you. Now that's night hiking in style!

7:44 p.m. on July 20, 2011 (EDT)
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I have a Predator Costume I wear scare the hell out of people. Works on bears too for some reason...

9:25 a.m. on July 21, 2011 (EDT)
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Scale to heighth lol?

9:30 a.m. on July 21, 2011 (EDT)
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XterroBrando said:

I have a Predator Costume I wear scare the hell out of people. Works on bears too for some reason...

 

I've always wanted a watch like that creature used.

                                                ~r2~

10:16 a.m. on July 21, 2011 (EDT)
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Posted this in another thread but it seems more appropriate for this one.

have an idea. Get a couple of these bike lights and an external frame backpack like whomeworry's and mount them on the top of the frame. 

Kind of like putting the lights on a jeep or truck's roll bar.  

P.S. Click on the "beam test" at the bike light website and move your mouse over the picture.

10:47 p.m. on August 18, 2011 (EDT)
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Electronics in the back country? nope

11:40 p.m. on August 18, 2011 (EDT)
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Hey BD, I use a juice pack air. http://www.mophie.com/mobile/default.aspx#P226 It is a protective case plus external battery that recharges the iPod. It about doubles the life of your iPod. I have a topo app on mine that I can download a high resolution topo map of anywhere in north America. Plus it will plot your position and has a compass. It has performed well for me. You have to make sure you power your iPod all the way off when you're not using it to save battery life though.

I hope this was a helpful response.

11:43 p.m. on August 19, 2011 (EDT)
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I am surprised at how many (percentage wise) do bring electronics with them. I don't and I won't.  i do understand the "in case of emergencies" argument but to me everything else is almost sacrilege.  That's like moving to NH from MA to get away from all the taxes and then voting for more social programs (which raises taxes)because the government isn't giving enough. (Just sayin').

12:50 a.m. on August 20, 2011 (EDT)
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I do! 

 

For no other reason than... Great tunes...having great times! Its not a 24 hour thing, but when the campfires going and I'm all settled in, a little, rock, country, blues, bluegrass sounds real nice and comforting to myself.  Sometimes I'm canoeing or hiking 6-10 hours, and a little "toonage" feels reals relaxing. I'm all about the sounds of nature, but a little James Taylor Fire and Rain goes real nice once I've settled in and ready to unwind....sometimes with some Southern Comfert!   my .02 cents    ;)

2:07 p.m. on August 20, 2011 (EDT)
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I don't think it's horrible to bring along a little entertainment especially if you are solo hiking. If you bring along a GPS  to track you where you've hiked so you can share it online what's wrong with that?

If you need a GPS so you don't get lost you're an idiot if you don't take a map and compass and know how to use them.  Map, compass and book cost less than the GPS the most expensive thing will be the time to read the book and practice using it. (BTW you can practice on a trail you won't get lost on and have fun doing it.)

8 yr old took along his Nintendo DS on our AT hike.  He didn't play it, instead he played cards with me, but it was kind of a security blanket for him to take it.

I think purists will never take electronics along except possibly some emergency beacon. The rest of us will take along electronics to make our outdoors experience more enjoyable.

2:13 p.m. on August 20, 2011 (EDT)
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ocalacomputerguy said:

I don't think it's horrible to bring along a little entertainment especially if you are solo hiking. If you bring along a GPS  to track you where you've hiked so you can share it online what's wrong with that?

 Big difference between a gps and an ipod. 

6:53 p.m. on August 20, 2011 (EDT)
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v trek said:

I am surprised at how many (percentage wise) do bring electronics with them. I don't and I won't.  i do understand the "in case of emergencies" argument but to me everything else is almost sacrilege.  That's like moving to NH from MA to get away from all the taxes and then voting for more social programs (which raises taxes)because the government isn't giving enough. (Just sayin').

 

Soooooo...

That's a "no" then on carrying the ghetto blaster for our group?

I wouldn't go so far as to call other reasons for carrying electronics in the backcountry "sacrilege". It is just another form (if one so chooses) of entertainment, aside from the functional capabilities of many electronics. Listening to music on an ipod is similar to listening to a friend play his/her harmonica or guitar at the campsite. It is still entertainment.

That said, I'm one for making fellowship with nature my number one priority when I'm "out there", not playing with my iPhone.

 

7:46 p.m. on August 20, 2011 (EDT)
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I only play with my phone when I am having pizza delivered to various mile markers. Oh and when I miss everyone here at Trailspace.

11:38 p.m. on August 20, 2011 (EDT)
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Rick

True there is a big difference between them but they are both electronics. I agree with Xterro, sitting around playing the harmonica or guitar is the old time equivalent to listening to an Ipod.

In one post WhoMeWorry talks about backpacking a keg. I would be very surprised if there wasn't some music at that camp site.  I'm not going to condemn somebody if they want to listen to a radio/music in their own camp or while hiking because it enhances their experience.

On the other hand I think it's kind of silly to haul a bunch of electronics to entertain yourself when you go hiking. What's the point? Each to his own.

 

11:51 p.m. on August 20, 2011 (EDT)
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I bring my phone. It's not a fancy data phone, iphone, or anything like that, but I can store and play music on it and have headphones for it. It also serves as an emergency back up if I have signal and something goes wrong.

3:52 p.m. on August 21, 2011 (EDT)
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ocalacomputerguy said:

Rick

..I agree with Xterro, sitting around playing the harmonica or guitar is the old time equivalent to listening to an Ipod.

In one post WhoMeWorry talks about backpacking a keg. I would be very surprised if there wasn't some music at that camp site... 

I disagree that canned music is the same as live music. It is a completely different vibe, regardless if you are the musician or the audience, especially if the canned music is played via buds, and not communally shared.  That is my biggest issue, camping with gadget heads; they tend to crawl into their toys, and are less social around the fire and camp.  There is one friend I will not camp with unless others accompany us, because he listens to pod casts, making for a distracted and awkward conversation.  I might as well go solo if all he is good for is sharing gas costs.

As for the keg, we played live music (picture Ozark blue grass meets Texas swing, meets Greatful Dead), and it was a much lower key event than word "keg" implies.  Our music is always live. 

Ed  

6:31 p.m. on August 21, 2011 (EDT)
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Yes I do, a lot and for a few reasons. Most of my outings are in winter and the I-pod always punches over it's weight in my kit.

If we're putting in a slog of a skin track over super cruisey (non avi) terrain for hours on end then I'll have it on for sure with a little Brunton solar roll on the pack to keep him happy (and the camera...and the GPS...and the head torch...of course). 

I was tent bound for a bit recently and throwing on some thumping metal to motivate me to negotiate frozen boots and man up to dig the tent out every few hours was just the ticket... good times. Of course I'd have been fine otherwise but who cares. I watched a few films too just coz I could.

I always listen to music though so I'm more inclined to listen to it on the hill as well.

Great map weight too.

 

 

5:17 a.m. on August 22, 2011 (EDT)
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Even though this thread is supposed to be for folks who do carry in iPods it seems to have been taken over by opinionated anti iPod folks. Have any of you antis spent a night in a lean too with a ferocious snorer, or a couple of kids that couldn't sleep? We would like to have the woods all to ourselves, but that's not reality. Couple that with an effort to minimize impact by using established camping platforms and lean-toos and you regularly find yourself camping among others. Earbuds work alot better than earplugs.

Dear Hijackers, Please refrain from posting if you don't have anything beneficial to say or experience with the use of iPods on the trail please. If you'd like to start a new thread on why not to take canned music then do so.

2:34 p.m. on August 22, 2011 (EDT)
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MoZee, my original thought behind ipod use is the safety of using such a device in the backcountry. Mudslide, rockslides, and avalanches happen. Then ya have the whole widow-maker thing. Then there are these rattlesnake thingies that make a buzz with their tail to warn of their presence. Kinda hard to hear with something jammed in your ears... especially being they blend into their surroundings so well. I could go on and on about this but I will leave at what I listed above.

As far as the whole kid thing I would most certainly want to be dialed into what they are doing in the backcountry as well for the fear that kids are curious and can get into mischief(wandering off) when one is not paying attention to their every move.

I think listening to an ipod just to dial children out is not only selfish but reckless at the same time.

Oh one more thing, before you go making accusations in regards to " this thread is supposed to be for folks who do carry in iPods" you may want to read the subject again.

Here I can help you with that.

"Do you bring your Ipod with you on camping/hiking trips?"

My answer was no and why not. Its not a question that is directed at ipod users in general and the bashing of such users only huh.... My ipod stays with me when I am maxing out my bench press at around 450 at the gym. I don't even use them when road running because I have been hit by someone in a car when they didn't realize there was this thing called a redlight. I didn't hear the tires screeching due to the fact that I had Pantera on ear bleed volume. I didn't get hurt, just a few bruises(can't say the same for their windshield though.) Lesson learned.

As far as the snoring goes I am typically solo but they make these things called ear plugs. You should try them sometime(when around adults;) they work great.

Sometimes people have a tendency to take my directness at times as being rude. This has the potential to be one of those times. If so it is not meant to be. I do want to commend your intentions of keeping the topic on point though- Happy hiking, Rick

8:51 p.m. on August 22, 2011 (EDT)
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whomeworry said:

ocalacomputerguy said:

Rick

..I agree with Xterro, sitting around playing the harmonica or guitar is the old time equivalent to listening to an Ipod.

In one post WhoMeWorry talks about backpacking a keg. I would be very surprised if there wasn't some music at that camp site... 

I disagree that canned music is the same as live music. It is a completely different vibe, regardless if you are the musician or the audience, especially if the canned music is played via buds, and not communally shared.  That is my biggest issue, camping with gadget heads; they tend to crawl into their toys, and are less social around the fire and camp.  There is one friend I will not camp with unless others accompany us, because he listens to pod casts, making for a distracted and awkward conversation.  I might as well go solo if all he is good for is sharing gas costs.

As for the keg, we played live music (picture Ozark blue grass meets Texas swing, meets Greatful Dead), and it was a much lower key event than word "keg" implies.  Our music is always live. 

Ed  

 I've got no problems with either side here. Those Darn Apple products are so polarizing, aren't they? LOL...

Yes Ed, certainly live and unplugged is a spiritual experience, and using canned music on an iPod is isolatory if the earbuds are in. If you are hiking with a partner or friend, it should be in order to spend time with your friend, and "plugging in" certainly does not facilitate quality time with your pal(s). My favorite camping musical instrument for sharing with campmates is armpit percussion...

10:22 p.m. on August 22, 2011 (EDT)
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MoZee said:

..Dear Hijackers, Please refrain from posting if you don't have anything beneficial to say or experience with the use of iPods ...

With all due respect the OP asks if anyone carries a ipod into the BC.  Those who posted affirmatively also described their sentiments.  But the question itself does not preclude others from posting a no answer and their reasons either. 

BTW, ear plugs work fine for me in the very application you describe.  To each his own.

Ed

10:33 p.m. on August 22, 2011 (EDT)
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XterroBrando said:

My favorite camping musical instrument for sharing with campmates is armpit percussion...

Hey if you can play the kazoo too then pull up a rock!

Ed

9:53 a.m. on August 23, 2011 (EDT)
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Ed said:

As for the keg, we played live music (picture Ozark blue grass meets Texas swing, meets Greatful Dead), and it was a much lower key event than word "keg" implies.  Our music is always live.

Sorry, didn't mean to offend you if I did. I was pretty sure it wasn't an all out head-bangers ball where you trashed the woods instead of a hotel room.

I disagree that canned music is the same as live music. It is a completely different vibe, regardless if you are the musician or the audience, especially if the canned music is played via buds, and not communally shared.  That is my biggest issue, camping with gadget heads; they tend to crawl into their toys, and are less social around the fire and camp.  There is one friend I will not camp with unless others accompany us, because he listens to pod casts, making for a distracted and awkward conversation.  I might as well go solo if all he is good for is sharing gas costs.

I don't disagree with you about canned music.  However it does depend on the maker of the live music. If its me, I can guarantee that you will wish you had brought an Ipod and a set of noise canceling headphones. if I were to attempt to play or sing all forms of wild life would flee unless cornered, then it will form a posse and come after me.

I agree with you on gadget heads, but that rule applies to anything be it electronic or not. However if both of you were big baseball fans and you wanted to listen to a game on the radio I would think that was okay, since it is something both of you would enjoy.

If you are soloing do as you please. I might take along some pod casts, music or a book on tape. Especially if I might be stuck in a tent for awhile without anybody else. Heck even if you have a friend along, you can get bored playing cards and talking.

8:40 p.m. on August 24, 2011 (EDT)
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For those who do like some music while out sometimes, what do you like to listen to? For me, my favorite three albums on my MP3 that are played are:

Iron Maiden - Fear of the Dark

Fleetwood Mac - Greatest Hits

Killing Joke - Brighter than A Thousand Suns

You?

6:47 a.m. on August 25, 2011 (EDT)
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 Kate Smith  --  "God Bless America"

                                                 ~r2~

12:48 p.m. on August 25, 2011 (EDT)
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I don't care what anybody brings into the BC, but I go with no electronics, to include a cell/beacon/sat whatever. I seemed to do just fine before this stuff came out. Granted, I am single with no kids, so I can imagine this has something to do with my reasoning.

It's like the toothbrush thing, any self described UL'er will show you his/her "cut down" toothbrush, when any real UL'er wouldn't even brush their teeth.

There is no need to feel ashamed because you are uncomfortable in the wilderness and bring a cell/beacon/Ipod etc. Everyone is special in their own way!

1:02 p.m. on August 25, 2011 (EDT)
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android said:

I don't care what anybody brings into the BC, but I go with no electronics, to include a cell/beacon/sat whatever. I seemed to do just fine before this stuff came out. Granted, I am single with no kids, so I can imagine this has something to do with my reasoning.

It's like the toothbrush thing, any self described UL'er will show you his/her "cut down" toothbrush, when any real UL'er wouldn't even brush their teeth.

There is no need to feel ashamed because you are uncomfortable in the wilderness and bring a cell/beacon etc. Everyone is special in their own way!

 +1- I think technology has a tendency to make people more reliant on said gizmos. I am a map and compass kinda guy lol. I do have a GPS unit but it doesn't get used on marked trails. As far as the cell goes, its pretty much  to track weather patterns, and let the wife know I am still kicking. Also great to order pizzas delivered to various mile markers. :)

12:30 a.m. on August 31, 2011 (EDT)
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android said:

I don't care what anybody brings into the BC, but I go with no electronics, to include a cell/beacon/sat whatever. I seemed to do just fine before this stuff came out. Granted, I am single with no kids, so I can imagine this has something to do with my reasoning.

It's like the toothbrush thing, any self described UL'er will show you his/her "cut down" toothbrush, when any real UL'er wouldn't even brush their teeth.

There is no need to feel ashamed because you are uncomfortable in the wilderness and bring a cell/beacon/Ipod etc. Everyone is special in their own way!

funny. yes, being single would certainly have something to do with your reasoning - and your disrespectful tone...

I can assure you, Android, (the irony of your avatar name is wonderful given your condiscending tone towards "techies" in the backcountry) that having my i-phone along for the trip has nothing to do with being uncomfortable in the wilderness.

1:17 a.m. on August 31, 2011 (EDT)
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Please excuse the spelling - condescending...

I have enjoyed 30 years of backcountry trips without electronics, but now have responsibilities to my wife and kids. As such, my iPhone and other electronics, maps, and compass, along with amassing a thorough knowledge of wilderness survival and the chosen area of adventure, are prudent measures to better insure my safe return.

My I-phone also acts as a camera, video camera, a journal, a story and a nature reference book, an astronomy device, a gps, a musical instrument, a prank machine (fun with kids in camp), a music player, etc.

I think it was Mr T who said "I pity the fool who isn't prepared!" I do like your profile pic,

Android. BTW - I love Google Earth on your platform - it provides such great views of the trails on which I am hiking. Will your 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich version include autopostting to Facebook and Twitter when we're on trail with GPS enabled? Sometimes I take my wife's EVO 4G on my trips instead.

1:20 a.m. on August 31, 2011 (EDT)
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Posted from my i-Phone, BTW. COL. while on top of San Jacinto Mtn.

Jk. About the Mtn part...

1:43 a.m. on August 31, 2011 (EDT)
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I have a friend who likes to blast his music on his iPod. I think it's annoying. The only electronic devices I bring are my DSLR or GoPro (my favorite new toy now).

We did a short 5 mile backpacking weekend in Sequoia and there was a hotspot at our campsite! The High Sierra Trail to Mehrten Creek. Even backpacking through Sequoia National Park, if you can get cell phone reception, you're too close to the city!

9:30 a.m. on August 31, 2011 (EDT)
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ooohfishy said:

I have a friend who likes to blast his music on his iPod. I think it's annoying. 

 That would drive me completely insane and although this individual is a friend if it were me I would most certainly mention it because there is a good chance that he is really hurting the chances of seeing some really neat wildlife on the trail if this is where this is occurring...

If it was me I would have to buy him a new ipod after the first trip due to the fact that I would probably take it and do something to it that would hinder its ability to play anything other than "paperweight" ever again.

Better the ipod than me having to explain to the local Ranger why my buddy is in a tree against his will. ;)

11:25 a.m. on September 1, 2011 (EDT)
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Friends don't let friends iPods turn them into iPuds...

The worst is when you're in a place of tranquility, and your buddy (or a stranger-even worse) feels compelled to hum, sing, or rap out loud the song playing in his/her earbuds. If that happens in the backcountry, the offender should have a fresh slab of meat hung above his head. Probably wouldn't notice it was there until it was too late.

2:23 p.m. on September 1, 2011 (EDT)
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Here's an interesting thing I ran across. Listed in the 2010 Backpacking Light Staff Picks is of all things a 20 year old HP-12c calculator. He takes it backpacking. Honest.  What on earth he does with a financial calculator on a hike I don't know.

Another weird thing listed was an "Accountability Collar" which turned out to be a SportDOG Rechargeable NoBark 10R Bark Control Collar (I was thinking something along the lines of a surveillance oriented device to make sure the husband did go hiking). 

Also listed were a Spot2 locator, a couple of smart phones and last but not least...... an IPod.

9:26 p.m. on September 1, 2011 (EDT)
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Here's an interesting thing I ran across. Listed in the 2010 Backpacking Light Staff Picks is of all things a 20 year old HP-12c calculator. He takes it backpacking. Honest...

...Also listed were a Spot2 locator, a couple of smart phones and last but not least...... an IPod."

As "Hannibal" Smith said, "I love it when a plan comes together"...

9:40 p.m. on September 1, 2011 (EDT)
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A 20yr old calculator? Really? I am having one of those uh-huh moments.

Oh well if it works for the individual why not... In the over-all scope of things its all about what makes one happy. 

10:30 p.m. on September 1, 2011 (EDT)
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Ryan Jordan of backpacking light staff said:

I love stuff that lasts a long time and remains useful. I've had this calculator for more than 20 years. The only other things that I've been with for more than 20 years and still enjoy are my Leica M6 and my wife. I've changed the batteries in her (the HP12C) only once, sometime in the late 1990s. It's been dropped in the toilet (fell out of my shirt pocket when I leaned over to flush it), lost in the snow (it fell out of my backpack during a storm, and I found it a few weeks later after the snow melted), suffered spills of root beer and coffee, and endured several routine rinsings under the faucet to clean it up again. I still use it almost every day and scrub her (the HP12C) clean with a bristle brush and soapy water annually.


WHAT could you possibly need a programmable financial calculator on a hike for? Sextant calculations? 

10:39 p.m. on September 1, 2011 (EDT)
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I would have thrown it away after dropping it in the toilet...

 

11:24 p.m. on September 1, 2011 (EDT)
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Xterro you don't understand the devotion to HP RPN (reverse polish notation) calculators some people have. It is fanatical. I had a 15c for a while because it was far better than a TI-35 (no such thing as a graphing calculator at that time). There is one nice thing about them. Nobody wants to borrow them from you because of the RPN.  

For those of you who don't know what RPN is I'll explain it.  There is no equal sign on the keyboard.  It works with a stack. Each time you press [enter] the number displayed is put on top of the stack. When you push an operator it uses the number displayed and the top number on the stack and replaces them with the answer. Examples:

To add 5 and 9 you type 5 [enter] 9 [+]

To calculate 4 + (3 x 8)

4 [enter] 3 [enter] 8 [x] [+]

Since I've probably lost you by now from boredom and/or confused you completely I'll stop explaining. But you get the idea.  Nobody wants to borrow it from you.

I still have no clue WHY anybody would take that calculator hiking or any for that matter. Especially an ultra lighter. They could use that 3 ounces or so to bring along toothpaste for the sawed off toothbrush.

 

11:29 p.m. on September 1, 2011 (EDT)
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ocalacomputerguy said: "I still have no clue WHY anybody would take that calculator hiking or any for that matter. "

 

Some of use need the quite time out of the wilderness to plot our "world domination".

11:50 p.m. on September 1, 2011 (EDT)
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Apeman, you already live far enough into the boonies to not have DSL or Cable internet. Exactly how quite do you need it?  In the area I live that IS where the people plotting world domination live.

12:24 a.m. on September 2, 2011 (EDT)
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ocalacomputerguy said:

Apeman, you already live far enough into the boonies to not have DSL or Cable internet. Exactly how quite do you need it?  In the area I live that IS where the people plotting world domination live.

 

Just the point; with no one out this way I have all the fredoom to make my plans.  They do always look in the wrong places for those who plot "world domination" after all.    I was working in my garden the other day when low and behold a car alarm went off.  Really, the only one(s )up here that would steal a car is a coyote, but I ruled it them out as they don't have opposable thumbs. The raccoons on the other hand (pun intended),have the thumbs but, well........... way to short.  It was all I could do to not go blow up the car up. 

"Exactly how quite do yo need it?"

How quite is quite, anyway?

2:36 a.m. on September 2, 2011 (EDT)
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I'm just happy that this BPL staffer affirmed my genius as a carrier of sophisticated electronics into the backcountry.

Now that I think about it, I don't know that this calculator buff's endoresement of electronics in the backcountry has much ring to it...a little crazy maybe.

Darn it :/

7:52 a.m. on September 2, 2011 (EDT)
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ocalacomputerguy said:

..I still have no clue WHY anybody would take that calculator hiking or any for that matter. Especially an ultra lighter. They could use that 3 ounces or so to bring along toothpaste for the sawed off toothbrush.

 

 

That guy with the HP calculator obviously has some important reason to bring it, although I question his reliance on such tech in the rugged outdoors.

Ok, at the risk of being nominated nerd of the new millennia, I have taken a slide rule and protractor into the boonies. Yes, a slide rule.

Sometimes weather limits your visibility such that you may be able orient off of only one landmark.  For example you are on a ridgeline, shooting for a specific saddle among several in fairly close proximity (actual case).  Crossing the wrong one may result in descending into an impassible hanging valley, instead of a through route to the valley further below.  Your landmark sighted is a lake below, but there are several lakes all similar in size and shape on the map in that area.  Quickly you take a bearing on said lake and estimate the inclinometer value between you and the lake using the protractor before clouds obscure this single landmark.  Your altimeter provides your current elevation, but all the passes close by are about the same elevation.  The wrong decision will cost an entire day climbing back up to the proper pass before you can continue on in your journey. Where are you?  Knowing your current elevation, the elevation angle to your landmark, and some trigonometry will permit systematic identification which lake you sighted, allowing you to obtain an accurate compass vector, hence your location where that vector crosses your elevation contour.  Perhaps I could get by with a solar powered calculator, but I am disinclined to depend on technology when other alternatives are available.  (When shown this navigation technique, the only slide rule I could find was on Ebay.)

Ed      

10:50 a.m. on September 2, 2011 (EDT)
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brilliant Ed! Nerds rule! My wife has a t-shirt that reads "I love NERDS". I can only assume she means my son and me...and Steve Jobs.

1:21 p.m. on September 2, 2011 (EDT)
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Thanks Ed that makes sense.  As for the solar powered calculator I would rather have the HP.  They are EXTREMELY frugal when it comes to batteries. They use 3 or 4 mercury type cells and those will literally last you for years. Plus they are tougher than any solar calculator I've ever seen.

Thanks for the lesson on orienteering. I'll have to remember that if I'm going somewhere where I will have to rely on a map.

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