About | Blog | Forums | People | Free Newsletter
Trailspace is a product review site for outdoor enthusiasts. Use it to find and share great gear.

Hilleberg on sale

4:15 p.m. on August 25, 2011 (EDT)
2 reviewer rep
690 forum posts

20% off in most cases.  Don't see this that often so I thought I would post:

http://www.neptunemountaineering.com/neptune/dept.asp?dept_name=Tents+%26+Shelters&dept_id=3672&s_id=0

 

Note: I have no affiliation to this company whatsoever.

4:20 p.m. on August 25, 2011 (EDT)
1,633 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

Some pretty sweet deals on there. Good deals on packs and other stuff too.

7:42 p.m. on August 25, 2011 (EDT)
TOP 25 REVIEWER REVIEW CORPS
973 reviewer rep
571 forum posts

Wow I don't think I've seen Hillies on sale before. This could get me into big financial trouble....

8:08 p.m. on August 25, 2011 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
1,238 forum posts

We discussed this potentially occurring, recently.    Now it has.

                                               ~r2~

8:12 p.m. on August 25, 2011 (EDT)
2 reviewer rep
690 forum posts

No.  You said that there would be fire sales on used Hillebergs and to watch the Gear Swap with baited breath.  Still waiting for this to happen.

8:55 p.m. on August 25, 2011 (EDT)
163 reviewer rep
100 forum posts

So tempting.................but I have officially sworn off non-freestanding tents.

That 2+ pound solo outfit looks very nice though!

11:24 p.m. on August 25, 2011 (EDT)
1,633 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

android said:

So tempting.................but I have officially sworn off non-freestanding tents.

That 2+ pound solo outfit looks very nice though!

 Most of the tents on that sale are free standing. There is 2 pages to the sale. Not all Hilles.

11:38 p.m. on August 25, 2011 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
29 forum posts

Check the Hilleberg website as well.  They sometimes have seconds or lightly used display models on sale.  No insane discounts but still good deals.  

5:36 a.m. on August 26, 2011 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
1,238 forum posts

CWF said:

No.  You said that there would be fire sales on used Hillebergs and to watch the Gear Swap with baited breath.  Still waiting for this to happen.

 Hmmm ....

I've been seeing a slight up-tick in Hilleberg offerings on eBay.

                                                  ~r2~

12:52 a.m. on August 28, 2011 (EDT)
RETAILER
8 reviewer rep
210 forum posts

FYI, putting Hilleberg tents on sale is a no-no, according to Hilleberg USA.  Three strikes and yer out.

Looks like they are no longer on sale at Neptune.

2:16 a.m. on August 28, 2011 (EDT)
2 reviewer rep
690 forum posts

A no-no is a no-no.  Thanks for letting us know.

9:05 a.m. on August 29, 2011 (EDT)
MODERATOR REVIEW CORPS
658 reviewer rep
2,137 forum posts

It doesn't look like they will be selling for Petra anymore, the only hilleberg shelter still up for sale is the bivanorac. 

I am guessing they decided to end their sales relationship, then opted to get rid of their remaining inventory by putting it on sale. If so, I guess they didn't mind burning their bridges.

9:20 a.m. on August 29, 2011 (EDT)
225 reviewer rep
1,158 forum posts

Here's an idea:  A philanthropist should buy up about a thousand Hilleberg tents (crazy idea) and then sell them at half-price on his "outfitter" website.  I know, it doesn't make any sense, but it may get Hilleberg steamed just knowing some of their tents are advertised as "50% Off!"

10:25 a.m. on August 29, 2011 (EDT)
2 reviewer rep
690 forum posts

Great idea Tipi.  VigilGuy, are you listening?

; )

I feel bad for the Neptune Mountaineering situation.  However, consider that they have a stand alone shop and it is possible that they are simply not offering the Hilleberg's for sale online.  

1:04 p.m. on August 29, 2011 (EDT)
1,633 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

Personally I like Hilleberg tents but with the way their prices are headed it kinda kills it for me. After much thought I have decided against ever purchasing a Hillerberg anything ever. There are alot of good tents out there for less money. Some just have to be found.

It really jacks my nerves a bit that with the way the economy is instead of giving back to the customers and keeping the tent prices in range of where people can actually get their hands on them they decide to increase the price of said tents. 

I personally am one that pretty much buys what ever I want when it comes to gear regardless of price but Hilleberg won't be getting a dime from me. I had one of their tents and while it was a very good shelter I will never purchase another. 

I would rather give my money to a company that appreciates their customers and gives a bit back instead of taking away... Lets face it if it wasn't for their customers they wouldn't even be a blip on the radar.

$790 for a 3 season tent? Yeah right... ok... I can only imagine where the price will be set on the 4 season tents here in the not so distant future.

This comment may make a few Hille loyals mad and I am sorry for that(its not intended too) but Hille can burn in Hades with the black flies as far as I am concerned. Its quite apparent to me that they are more interested in their profit margins and not keeping their products somewhat "reasonable" to the general consumer.

Kinda reminds me of the whole Air Jordan thing. When I was over-seas in their country of origin a pair could be had for $20. Same ones sold on shelves here in the local Footlocker for $150... I would be really interested to find out what the cost of production is on each model tent. I have a hunch it is nowhere near where the retail prices are set.... They can make money off someone else... Not off my dime.

1:19 p.m. on August 29, 2011 (EDT)
2 reviewer rep
690 forum posts

I don't disagree - the 3 season pricing is absurd.  Spend almost as much as their expedition ready tents and get less. 

I don't buy the weak US $$ argument.  Having owned my own business for a number of years, there is a thing called "the cost of doing business," and unfortunately companies cannot just pass on the cost to the consumer and expect there not to be a drop in business given that there are alternatives to the product.  I'll ask this question again - is the three season Rogen going to be THAT superior to an MSR Hubba Hubba or Tarptent Scarp 2 to warrant being over 100% more expensive?  If so, in what way?

1:24 p.m. on August 29, 2011 (EDT)
1,633 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

I was a sales team leader awhile back. I am not going to get into what company but they are not associated with outdoor gear and they are very well known. I was very good at closing the deal. I ranked within the top in the company. When I realized the whole scheme of things(astronomical profit margins, etc.) I walked away. My conscience just wouldn't let me swallow what the business practices actually were. 

1:27 p.m. on August 29, 2011 (EDT)
1,633 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

CWF said:

I'll ask this question again - is the three season Rogen going to be THAT superior to an MSR Hubba Hubba or Tarptent Scarp 2 to warrant being over 100% more expensive?  If so, in what way?

 Its a Hilleberg... It all has to do with the name. Hillebergs are great tents and people who are really into this kind of thing are aware of that. Sometimes the name alone is enough to justify the purchase of a product for some people and the companies know it.

I am developing a very bad taste in my mouth towards this company.

1:56 p.m. on August 29, 2011 (EDT)
2 reviewer rep
690 forum posts

I have no doubt that their expedition tents are worth it (I have had two - sold one and one was recently stolen!!!) but the three season approach is befuddling.

1:57 p.m. on August 29, 2011 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
1,236 forum posts

@Rick-Pittsburgh :  I'm with you on this one.  These, in the begining looked to be real neat, cool, quality tents, but what I find is I'm feeling that their selling tents on name recognition more than quality as I've heard many discriptions of real use situations in which they retain to much moisture and they sag in the wind a rain.  What's the difference between a tent that leaks in the rain and a tent that retains moisture and dumps it on you in the morning when you mistakenly bump the tent?  Nothing, wet is wet.  Who would want to wake up every morning wondering if they were going to bump the tent and cause a disaster first thing in the morning?  Who wants to wake up in the morning and wipe down the entire inside of a tent? Not me, that's not why I venture into the wilderness.   And what's with this sagging thing, they have what is suppose to be the strongest tent material made along with the avaliablity of the stronges & lightest poles at there disposal.  Not only should these tents not sag, they, for the price and materials used, should handle winds & rain much better than any other tent on the market.  I have no problem paying more for an item if the item meets its price point.  These do not seem to do that in my opinion.  It is sad but my very first tent serviced me as a 4 season tent for 25 years.  It cost me $175 new in 1976/77 and did not sag and did not get condensation in the tent body causing internal morning down pour.  They have had this condensation and sagging thing figured out of at least 30 years in double wall tents and the condesation thing figured out since the early 1990's.  Why do we bury our heads in the sand and pretend that this is the best we can do?  It is not.  I have a lot of tents and none of the tents that I have used so far has ever had these problems.  Regarding  tents that I have not tried yet, I have heard no reports of these things happing with any of the tents I have bought.  I feel I'm a good judge of tents as I have no predilection towards name brand or cost.  If you can make a good quality tent I will take a look at it and judge it, but I will be brutal and honest down to every thread.  The only Hillebergs I'm not considering are the Saitaris & Saivo at this time.  I will only buy them used and at much lower prices and at this point they are more for my collection rather than actual use.  I have way to many tents that perfom much better than the reports of how the Hillebergs seem to.  I think I'm a good judge of tents and my only predilection towards a brand of tent is if the quality lives up to it's name.  Currently I do not belive that Hilleberg tents live up to their name.

2:33 p.m. on August 29, 2011 (EDT)
2 reviewer rep
690 forum posts

Apeman - did you buy that ID eVent MK Xl on Ebay?

2:47 p.m. on August 29, 2011 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
1,236 forum posts

@CWF :
No, The guys I was camping with didn't want to wait for 40 min in the town where we found a computer that I could have used.  We don't have internet cafes in the smaller towns around here.  It went for $380.  I was willing to go $425 so I don't know it I would have gotten it.  But I will not freat as ID was just bought by a company that gives them much more access to Event material for all of their tents.  I personally think that all of ID's top end tents will be made with Event in the near future and then I'll snag one of them in the middle of winter used, it's jsut a waiting game now.  I did just pick up a Winter Warm single wall gortex geodesic dome tent (along with the mint unused footrpint) made in 1976.  It's cool beans, and is another example of a single wall  tent that does not build up condesation (or can handle the condensation that it does build up without causing a rainstorm) when used as it should be used.

2:57 p.m. on August 29, 2011 (EDT)
225 reviewer rep
1,158 forum posts

I remember the glory days when Hillebergs went for around $500.00 new.  Them days are over.  Hilleberg is not the only company making expensive gear, just check out the top of the line Arcteryx rain jackets (Alpha), the high end Feathered Friends or Valandre bags, or even the sub-zero rated Western Mountaineering bags.  Out of reach?  Naw.  Heck, we have local boys around here who don't think twice about paying top dollar for hunting dogs or rifles or dually trucks or all else.  The price of a Hilleberg can be justified if you spend enough time camping and backpacking with it, but for a couple weekend trips a year?  No way.

And yes, Hillebergs are not perfect tents by any means.  While the tunnels tend to sag when wet (and tightened easily enough), their dome tents are alittle tighter, namely the Staika and the Allack, etc.  What really sags are their yellow inner tents, held up by weak elastic, which over time permanently stretches.  We've been thru this tiresome subject before.

And really, Hillebergs are generally too small inside and cramped feeling because the canopies sag due to the inner tent not being directly supported by poles like on most other tents.  A standard inner tent like the Trango or Fury or Hubba is held rigid and firm by poles connected directly to the inner, with a fly thrown over.  Hilleberg needs, in my opinion, to get away from their elastic connectors and go the standard route of poled inners with removable flys.

Beyond this, having the Hilleberg name just to show off may be a factor in purchase as human nature gloms onto class oneupmanship in all things, not only tents.  Look at the Joneses with the 5,000 sq foot houses, or the yacht big spenders or the Car Envy types pretty much everywhere.

But here's the thing:  Hillebergs are made differently than most other tents---their quality and craftsmanship is higher in all regards when compared to other tent companies like Mt Hardwear, North Face or MSR.  I believe long term Hilleberg users come back again and again to what they know and love, and to tents that have been tested in some tough conditions. 

A case in point:  On my next trip I am taking my Keron 3 tunnel, and leaving the MSR Fury.  These are both excellent tents, but I miss the headroom of the Keron, I miss the great yellow canopy, I miss the strong vesti and door zippers, and I miss the strong 100 denier floor.  There's just something about a Hilleberg.

3:13 p.m. on August 29, 2011 (EDT)
1,633 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

Hey Tipi, I do agree with your points but at the same time I kinda think that Hille has that end of the "niche" market in a strangle hold to some extent. There are alot of fine Euro companies out there that have yet to be noticed.

I just came across Vango's Force Ten line today:

http://www.forcetentents.com/tents.html

I started a thread in gear selection in regards to the Force Ten models. They look to be very serious tents with comparable features.

Being Hille has an American Division HQ in Redmond Washington I feel this most certainly gives them a one up on exposure to the US market. 

I believe alot of the Euro companies probably make shelters that are just as robust/bomber as Hille(maybe even more so,) they just don't get the accolades Hille does because their models are not nearly as accessible to the US consumers/market base. 

When you really don't have any real competition in a region you are definitely going to be "well respected" in regards to the products you produce. 

3:23 p.m. on August 29, 2011 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
1,236 forum posts

@ Tipi,  So very true.  What really bothers me is that the so called "premier backpacking/expedition tent maker in the world" does not even bother to make there tents live up to expectations.  It's not like nobody knows how to make a tent that doesn't build up condensation and or sag.  Those are problems that have been tackled and solved in years passed.  I would venture to say that if the Hilleberg executives were forced to live in their tents for any length of time, say a month or so, that they would tweak their tents (and that's all I think they need is some tweaking) and fix the fixable problems.  At this point I feel there just a another tent maker in the mix of tent makers.  I also know that at this point there is a long list of tents I would take with me before picking most of the Hilleberg line.

3:36 p.m. on August 29, 2011 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
1,236 forum posts

Rick-Pittsburgh said:

Hey Tipi, I do agree with your points but at the same time I kinda think that Hille has that end of the "niche" market in a strangle hold to some extent. There are alot of fine Euro companies out there that have yet to be noticed.

I just came across Vango's Force Ten line today:

http://www.forcetentents.com/tents.html

I started a thread in gear selection in regards to the Force Ten models.

Being Hille has a HQ in Redmond Washington this gives them a one up on exposure to the US market. 

I believe alot of the Euro companies probably make shelters that are just as robust/bomber as Hille(maybe even more so,) they just don't get the accolades Hille does because their models are not nearly as accessible to the US consumers/market base. 

When you really don't have any real competition in a region you are definitely going to be "well respected" in regards to the products you produce. 

 

Rick,  I agree with you 100%, in fact I will go crack a beer and raise a mug in regards to what you just said.  A toast my friend,............... cheers!!!

3:46 p.m. on August 29, 2011 (EDT)
1,633 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

Its just logical from a business perspective. Thanks for the toast. Enjoy the brewski my friend.

4:10 p.m. on August 29, 2011 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
1,236 forum posts

vigilguy said:

FYI, putting Hilleberg tents on sale is a no-no, according to Hilleberg USA.  Three strikes and yer out.

Looks like they are no longer on sale at Neptune.

Does this extend to the customer base as well,  If I buy three Hillebergs on sale then I can't buy anymore?  dang,  harshin my tent buzz there ;-}}>

4:27 p.m. on August 29, 2011 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
1,236 forum posts

I said: "The only Hillebergs I'm not considering are the Saitaris & Saivo at this time."

I meant:  The only Hillebergs "I am" considering are the Saitaris & Saivo at this time.

7:01 p.m. on August 29, 2011 (EDT)
TOP 25 REVIEWER REVIEW CORPS
973 reviewer rep
571 forum posts

Hillies are expensive, no question about it. Are they worth it? Thats up to the individual consumer to determine. In my opinion they are. That said I wouldn't even consider the new 3 season releases. But the 4 season models have too many positives to just overlook. If bought at the right price (and thats a big 'if), I feel they have the great value.

I think, and correct me if I'm wrong, but a lot of the frustration is with the Hilleberg customer. Not all, but a portion. The ones that hear "Hillies are the Best", and whip out and buy one. It would be silly to think there aren't other great tents at around the same price point, even lower. Let's face it some people have money, too much money. Those are the ones that buy a tent built for extremes for their next 3 day car camping trip. Hillies are getting popular, probably too quickly. Thats when the prestige issue kicks in. When its cool to have that bright red tent sitting next to your Mercedes SUV at your site.

I bought my Unna used for $300 shipped. Thats putting it right in and around some of the other quality solo tents. Put up against some of the others in that price range and I don't see any competition. That goes back to buying it at the right price though I guess right?

When it comes down to it people need to realize there is no "best". What works for me here in Canada would be hell in the Southern US, and vice versa. A site like Trailspace is invaluable in researching products and geting others opinions. That said you need to do your own research and see why people are claiming something is so great. Are they claiming its great just because they just spent $800 and don't want to look like an idiot?, or is the product actually worth that money? IMO the PRODUCT (I agree with the consensus here that Hillie is selling alot based on the name) Hilleberg is putting out is top notch.

7:03 p.m. on August 29, 2011 (EDT)
TOP 25 REVIEWER REVIEW CORPS
973 reviewer rep
571 forum posts

I do share the frustration with the rising price point as well. Forgot to add that in the long-winded last post.

7:14 p.m. on August 29, 2011 (EDT)
1,633 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

Jake W said:

Hillies are expensive, no question about it. Are they worth it? Thats up to the individual consumer to determine. In my opinion they are. That said I wouldn't even consider the new 3 season releases. But the 4 season models have too many positives to just overlook. If bought at the right price (and thats a big 'if), I feel they have the great value.

I think, and correct me if I'm wrong, but a lot of the frustration is with the Hilleberg customer. Not all, but a portion. The ones that hear "Hillies are the Best", and whip out and buy one. It would be silly to think there aren't other great tents at around the same price point, even lower. Let's face it some people have money, too much money. Those are the ones that buy a tent built for extremes for their next 3 day car camping trip. Hillies are getting popular, probably too quickly. Thats when the prestige issue kicks in. When its cool to have that bright red tent sitting next to your Mercedes SUV at your site.

I bought my Unna used for $300 shipped. Thats putting it right in and around some of the other quality solo tents. Put up against some of the others in that price range and I don't see any competition. That goes back to buying it at the right price though I guess right?

When it comes down to it people need to realize there is no "best". What works for me here in Canada would be hell in the Southern US, and vice versa. A site like Trailspace is invaluable in researching products and geting others opinions. That said you need to do your own research and see why people are claiming something is so great. Are they claiming its great just because they just spent $800 and don't want to look like an idiot?, or is the product actually worth that money? IMO the PRODUCT (I agree with the consensus here that Hillie is selling alot based on the name) Hilleberg is putting out is top notch.

I would just like to see if the European heavy hitters made their presence well known here in the US if Hille would be as popular as they are now or take a hit.

I am going with they would take a hit.

11:45 p.m. on August 29, 2011 (EDT)
RETAILER
8 reviewer rep
210 forum posts

vigilguy said:

FYI, putting Hilleberg tents on sale is a no-no, according to Hilleberg USA.  Three strikes and yer out.

Looks like they are no longer on sale at Neptune.

Does this extend to the customer base as well,  If I buy three Hillebergs on sale then I can't buy anymore?  dang,  harshin my tent buzz there ;-}}>

 

This applies to the retail shops. Violate their pricing rules and you lose the dealership.

@ Tipi Walter - they tested the new 3 season model by connecting the poles to the inner tent and having the outer as a rain fly, and the prototype flattened in their wind machine tests. Once they went back to the exoskeleton design, the model was much more stable.

@ apeman - Hilleberg employees spend a lot of time in their tents. As a matter of fact, I know they tested the Allak model for two full years prior to releasing it into production.

Lots of speculation going on in this thread.

Having commented here, I do think that lots of backpackers would be very satisfied with other tents that are on the market. They overspend and under-use. I happen to camp above treeline where tents get shredded, but not everyone does. Used to use a Moss, but they got too heavy, so now I personally own three Hillebergs for various conditions. And a ID Wedge.

11:57 p.m. on August 29, 2011 (EDT)
2 reviewer rep
690 forum posts

vigilguy said:

@ Tipi Walter - they tested the new 3 season model by connecting the poles to the inner tent and having the outer as a rain fly, and the prototype flattened in their wind machine tests. Once they went back to the exoskeleton design, the model was much more stable.

 The exoskeleton design is a HUGE selling point for me!!

11:58 p.m. on August 29, 2011 (EDT)
RETAILER
8 reviewer rep
210 forum posts

I remember the glory days when Hillebergs went for around $500.00 new.  Them days are over.  Hilleberg is not the only company making expensive gear, just check out the top of the line Arcteryx rain jackets (Alpha), the high end Feathered Friends or Valandre bags, or even the sub-zero rated Western Mountaineering bags.  Out of reach?  Naw.  Heck, we have local boys around here who don't think twice about paying top dollar for hunting dogs or rifles or dually trucks or all else.  The price of a Hilleberg can be justified if you spend enough time camping and backpacking with it, but for a couple weekend trips a year?  No way.

And yes, Hillebergs are not perfect tents by any means.  While the tunnels tend to sag when wet (and tightened easily enough), their dome tents are alittle tighter, namely the Staika and the Allack, etc.  What really sags are their yellow inner tents, held up by weak elastic, which over time permanently stretches.  We've been thru this tiresome subject before.

And really, Hillebergs are generally too small inside and cramped feeling because the canopies sag due to the inner tent not being directly supported by poles like on most other tents.  A standard inner tent like the Trango or Fury or Hubba is held rigid and firm by poles connected directly to the inner, with a fly thrown over.  Hilleberg needs, in my opinion, to get away from their elastic connectors and go the standard route of poled inners with removable flys.

Beyond this, having the Hilleberg name just to show off may be a factor in purchase as human nature gloms onto class oneupmanship in all things, not only tents.  Look at the Joneses with the 5,000 sq foot houses, or the yacht big spenders or the Car Envy types pretty much everywhere.

But here's the thing:  Hillebergs are made differently than most other tents---their quality and craftsmanship is higher in all regards when compared to other tent companies like Mt Hardwear, North Face or MSR.  I believe long term Hilleberg users come back again and again to what they know and love, and to tents that have been tested in some tough conditions. 

A case in point:  On my next trip I am taking my Keron 3 tunnel, and leaving the MSR Fury.  These are both excellent tents, but I miss the headroom of the Keron, I miss the great yellow canopy, I miss the strong vesti and door zippers, and I miss the strong 100 denier floor.  There's just something about a Hilleberg.

 

I know what you mean about the Keron! I own the Keron 3 GT and love the spaciousness! We used it up in the Winds in Wyoming about three weeks ago. Plenty of room for us and our gear.

12:11 a.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
2 reviewer rep
690 forum posts

Looks like you could play shuffle board in that thing!

12:25 a.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
1,633 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

I think this may very well be comparable to the Keron 3. I am just saying that there are very solid options out there. 

Force Ten Titan 300


tents-titan-300-large.jpg
The more I look I am beginning to believe that while Hilles are good tents there may very well be better options out there. This tent has an exo-skeleton, and can all be pitched as one or fly separate.

Like I said in my previous post. Alot of it has to do with exposure in the US. If these companies got the exposure Hille did Hille may not be selling as many tents as they are. 

Unlike the Keron it has a spindrift skirt.

Granted its heavier but once ya get into this much weight as far as a shelter goes whats the difference? These aren't designed for set and move pitches anyways. They are more geared to base camp sets.

The more I research some of the other offerings out there I have a few from what I have seen that could very well hold a candle to Hilles in many regards. 

Honestly, I think its pretty lame Hille never puts there tents on sale. Its kind of another way to give back to the consumer which honestly is who make a company who they are. While making a decent tent I personally think their business practices leave alot to be desired when it comes to "customer appreciation." 

12:34 a.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
RETAILER
8 reviewer rep
210 forum posts

Rick - I am enjoying looking at these tent models that you are researching. Good job! Keep it up! I am always open minded about other mfgrs tents and what they have to offer.

12:37 a.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
1,633 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

I don't know what is going on with me as of late. I wanna pull the trigger on a new winter tent and off I go on a tangent. Not like I have enough choices. I found a company that will ship the Vango Force Tens to the US(at a cost of course.)

Here is the whole line again if ya didn't see it yet:

http://www.forcetentents.com/tents.html

I am really digging on these tents hard. Its not that I hate Hille. I personally think they make one hell of a good tent. I just wanted to find other options... 

Everytime I see a thread about "whats the best 4 season tent?" or " I want to get a new tent for winter use" ya always see Hilleberg in the responses. I went on an unrelenting search for options and I am surely far from done. I like learning about different gear offerings throughout the world. My brain sucks this stuff up like a sponge. 

12:41 a.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
REVIEW CORPS
1,397 reviewer rep
442 forum posts

Will never need a Hille, and IF I spent huge cash on a winter fortress, it would be on a made in the USA masterpiece.

 

However, these Vangos appear to be serious...

 

12:44 a.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
RETAILER
8 reviewer rep
210 forum posts

I know that Hillebergs are expensive compared to other tents. I also believe that no one else uses Kerlon fabric. It is incredibly strong and it last a long time. So make sure you are comparing apples to apples.

For what it's worth, I had a guy from Scotland email me and wanted to buy two Hilleberg tents from me, because they were a lot cheaper here in the U.S. than what he would have to pay in Scotland. I told him sorry, as i am not able to ship overseas.

I have had other customers from Austria, Germany and other places in Europe buy from my company when they were over here on business, which is okay for me to do, because they could buy it cheaper here in the U.S.

Yes, the prices are high, but they are better than what the European customers are having to pay.

12:46 a.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
RETAILER
8 reviewer rep
210 forum posts

I don't know what is going on with me as of late. I wanna pull the trigger on a new winter tent and off I go on a tangent. Not like I have enough choices. I found a company that will ship the Vango Force Tens to the US(at a cost of course.)

Here is the whole line again if ya didn't see it yet:

http://www.forcetentents.com/tents.html

I am really digging on these tents hard. Its not that I hate Hille. I personally think they make one hell of a good tent. I just wanted to find other options... 

Everytime I see a thread about "whats the best 4 season tent?" or " I want to get a new tent for winter use" ya always see Hilleberg in the responses. I went on an unrelenting search for options and I am surely far from done. I like learning about different gear offerings throughout the world. My brain sucks this stuff up like a sponge. 

 

Thanks again for finding these companies. It is fun for me as well.

12:46 a.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
1,633 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

XterroBrando said:

Will never need a Hille, and IF I spent huge cash on a winter fortress, it would be on a made in the USA masterpiece.

 

However, these Vangos appear to be serious...

 

 Apparently Force Ten is their high end expedition line. They've had these things everywhere(at altitude on Everest, blah, blah, blah.) 

I like Vangos Hurricane 200 and 300 as well. Basically a scaled down version(as far as the materials) of the Vortex. I really like the ventilation on these tents(dual on each side.)


vango-hurricane-200-grasshopper_1.jpg

12:48 a.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
1,633 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

vigilguy said:

I know that Hillebergs are expensive compared to other tents. I also believe that no one else uses Kerlon fabric. It is incredibly strong and it last a long time. So make sure you are comparing apples to apples.

For what it's worth, I had a guy from Scotland email me and wanted to buy two Hilleberg tents from me, because they were a lot cheaper here in the U.S. than what he would have to pay in Scotland. I told him sorry, as i am not able to ship overseas.

I have had other customers from Austria, Germany and other places in Europe buy from my company when they were over here on business, which is okay for me to do, because they could buy it cheaper here in the U.S.

Yes, the prices are high, but they are better than what the European customers are having to pay.

 I heard of someone paying 4 times as much for the Scarpas I use in Australia. So I can understand what ya mean. 

1:01 a.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
RETAILER
8 reviewer rep
210 forum posts

Here's an idea:  A philanthropist should buy up about a thousand Hilleberg tents (crazy idea) and then sell them at half-price on his "outfitter" website.  I know, it doesn't make any sense, but it may get Hilleberg steamed just knowing some of their tents are advertised as "50% Off!"

 

Go to Facebook and do a search for the 150th anniversary of Mammut gear...somebody bought 150 Hilleberg Saivo tents and set them up on a Glacier. Kind of a cool site to see!

1:17 a.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
1,633 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

vigilguy said:

Tipi Walter said:

Here's an idea:  A philanthropist should buy up about a thousand Hilleberg tents (crazy idea) and then sell them at half-price on his "outfitter" website.  I know, it doesn't make any sense, but it may get Hilleberg steamed just knowing some of their tents are advertised as "50% Off!"

 

Go to Facebook and do a search for the 150th anniversary of Mammut gear...somebody bought 150 Hilleberg Saivo tents and set them up on a Glacier. Kind of a cool site to see!

 They bought 150 Saivos? I just watched the vid. That gives a whole new meaning to "tent city." They were all red... That was wild.

2:02 a.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
367 forum posts


7dbf8f85-41c4-4871-8505-c59ae377ca2dHiRe

I can't deny that I appreciate some of the logic and results from controlling retail like this (Rolex, anyone?), but something about it also rubs me the wrong way.

8:52 a.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
225 reviewer rep
1,158 forum posts

vigilguy said:


@ Tipi Walter - they tested the new 3 season model by connecting the poles to the inner tent and having the outer as a rain fly, and the prototype flattened in their wind machine tests. Once they went back to the exoskeleton design, the model was much more stable.

 Their problem still remains the elastic connectors holding up the inner tent---I am assuming this is what they did in your example.  I would like to see them build a dynamite yellow inner tent (with the fantastic floor), such as the Keron tube-tunnel, then put non-elastic pole clips on this inner, then snap in the poles (with webbing grommets at the pole ends), and then throw a kerlon fly over this.  I know, this would obviate their exoskeleton claim to fame as a Hilleberg is known for setting up in one piece (in the rain, etc).

I believe if Hilleberg could make their inner tents more rigid somehow, maybe by using non-elastic connectors for all attachment points, then their exo-poled flys would make their inners more rigid and less sagging.

12:23 p.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
1,238 forum posts

Question:   What do European and Asian,  gonzo, wealthy cats (sorry 'bout the jargon, but I'm a musician)  that trek, climb, camp, etc. ... buy?

These would be the ones that have the "cost is not object" attitude, they simply want "the best", and do not have to have a U.S.A. connection for price reduction due to USD vs. the Euro or Yen.

____________________________________________________________

BTW -- I survived 'Irene'.   Now have electricity and internet service, back here on Maryland's Eastern Shore.    Was 'marooned' in Annapolis for a couple days with G/F.   Chesapeake Bay Bridge was closed to traffic.   Just rec'd Email message from her.   Power still off, after over 72 hrs ... and she lives in a pretty swanky condo.   Now staying with daughter a couple towns over.   Had to toss all her refrigerated food.

                                                   ~r2~

1:53 p.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
MODERATOR REVIEW CORPS
658 reviewer rep
2,137 forum posts

I do not currently own a Hilleberg, but I have yet to personally see and experience a tent in person that compares. Of course, that doesn't mean it doesn't exist, but for me seeing a tent in person is an important factor in what I will be willing to buy. 

Aside from that, I think there are a lot of things that make or detract from whether I feel like a company cares about it's customers. I have to say, whether their products are ever offered on sale is not one of those factors. On two separate occasions I have called the US Hilleberg HQ, and both times I spoke with Petra Hilleberg. Not some clueless temp CS agent like I got when I called Columbia, or the unanswered voicemail I got when I called Thermarest, but the director of US affairs and daughter of the founder. I am not even a current customer, but she spent about 20 minutes just chatting and answering my questions without a hint annoyance.  You know what happened when I called Stevenson's Warmlight to ask some questions? He hung up on me.

Petra taking the time to talk with me said more to me about the Hilleberg name and company than any catalog or branding spin ever could.  

2:39 p.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
225 reviewer rep
1,158 forum posts

gonzan said:

I do not currently own a Hilleberg, but I have yet to personally see and experience a tent in person that compares. Of course, that doesn't mean it doesn't exist, but for me seeing a tent in person is an important factor in what I will be willing to buy. 

Aside from that, I think there are a lot of things that make or detract from whether I feel like a company cares about it's customers. I have to say, whether their products are ever offered on sale is not one of those factors. On two separate occasions I have called the US Hilleberg HQ, and both times I spoke with Petra Hilleberg. Not some clueless temp CS agent like I got when I called Columbia, or the unanswered voicemail I got when I called Thermarest, but the director of US affairs and daughter of the founder. I am not even a current customer, but she spent about 20 minutes just chatting and answering my questions without a hint annoyance.  You know what happened when I called Stevenson's Warmlight to ask some questions? He hung up on me.

Petra taking the time to talk with me said more to me about the Hilleberg name and company than any catalog or branding spin ever could.  

 As I said in a recent post, there's just something about a Hilleberg . . . . .  And getting to talk to Petra is a big plus for us trail hounds who are out too long anyway and then when we get back in we get to ring up Petra?  What a cool setup.  But heck, I've only talked to her twice in the last six years, so it's not like I'm overly enticed . . . . .  But she IS in charge of a tent company.

When I got my first Staika and tested it after a dozen trips, I complained some about the umbrella fly connector toggles and even emailed Hilleberg a long diatribe on the subject.  A year later what happens?  The new Staikas come out with hooks which replace their "bad" design.  I doubt if it was because of my reviews or email, but then again, maybe it was. 

3:18 p.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
15 reviewer rep
30 forum posts

Most of the wealthy climbers I've met over the years never struck me as particularly interested in gear. They much prefer to chat about the natural environment or discuss new or less popular routes. Trekking for them is a form of escape from the daily grind of corporate life. Another thing I've observed, though this has nothing to do with your question, is that consumers tend to be somewhat loyal to their national brands. Ever wondered what mountain tents the Chinese are using? Well, below I've compiled a short list according to country of some of the most popular brands.     

Italians- Ferrino Snowbound

Italians - Salewa XPD Base http://www.sportolino.de/artikelbilder/4810_2400_xpd_base_l.jpg

Kiwis - Macpac Hemisphere http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2394/1784475581_cd3c23dde6.jpg

Japanese - Mont Bell Stellar Ridge http://iclimb.co.nz/action/stellar_ridge_4_lg.jpg

Taiwanese - Rhino U300/G4 http://www.mwtw.com/images/other/rhino/zg4_02.jpg

Chinese - Ozark Gear 94T100 http://www.ozarkgear.com.cn/images/201107/source_img/385_G_1309454426688.jpg

 

3:20 p.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
1,633 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

Thanks Babokulu. More tents to drive myself nuts with... :p

3:22 p.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
15 reviewer rep
30 forum posts

BTW, the previous post was a reply too Robert Rowe's question. I guess I need to type faster! 

3:32 p.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
1,633 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

I jump on anything that has a 4 season tent manufacturer attached to it. 

3:45 p.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
REVIEW CORPS
1,040 reviewer rep
1,011 forum posts

Rick: what if I told you "sale" was just something invented my marketers to make you think you're getting a good deal on something, when if fact you're not? What if "sale" was actually just the normal price of an object, appearing so enticing only due to contrast against the inflated "regular" price?

3:55 p.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
1,633 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

pillowthread said:

Rick: what if I told you "sale" was just something invented my marketers to make you think you're getting a good deal on something, when if fact you're not? What if "sale" was actually just the normal price of an object, appearing so enticing only due to contrast against the inflated "regular" price?

I understand that logic. When I was a sales team leader I had the latitude to take a product that retailed at $2500USD and work the price down to $1000 if need be just to get the sale and still make a hefty profit. I would like to add that it was a product that took alot more in the aspect of r&d/manufacturing than a tent in regards to the circuitry, materials, fab, etc... 

I am saying that for some of those out there that wished they could get their hands on a product but do not have the resources why not? It give those the opporotunity to have a bomber product that normally wouldn't get the chance of owning said product.

Does it really hurt a company over-all to have a sale from time to time? Absolutely not. It also helps a company get more of their product out there which in turn gives their product more exposure to the public which in turn can dramatically increase sales. 

Even at "sale" price companies still make a nice profit. They have the ability to throw the consumers a bone from time to time but just choose not too. 

I am sure I will never find this out but I am really curious as to how much the materials and cost of production actually is on each individual Hilleberg model. I have a hunch that the markup is pretty high. Then again, that goes with anything one purchases nowadays. 

Even if it is at sale price its still saving someone money when compared to paying retail which makes any consumer happy.

4:17 p.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
REVIEW CORPS
1,040 reviewer rep
1,011 forum posts

I knew you'd understand. I personally appreciate that Hilleberg doesn't play these sale "mind games" with its customers. As a consumer, my Hilleberg tent will retain it's value much longer than comparable offerings. Sure, I could have gotten a Big Agnes String Ridge or MSR Fury for roughly 2/3rds the price of my Allak, but used Furys go for $150 on ebay right now, while I can sell my Allak for $500 easily. And good luck selling a Vango...

I also agree with you that Hilleberg tents are not at the most extreme end of the expedition tent spectrum. I believe that spot is reserved for Helsport.

4:23 p.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
1,633 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

Anything I buy I typically keep even if I am less than enthused with it or give it away....I am not into the whole selling thing on ebay although I do purchase there from time to time.

Extra gear never hurts. Granted it may not meet "my" standards but can still be useful if I have someone out of the blue that wants to go with me for a weekend or so and they don't have something.

My sister is moving up here from Florida. Its the 1st time we will meet face to face(she is 21.) We just found out about each other a few months back.

She really wants to go on a hike with me. She doesn't have any gear but I have a bunch of stuff I no longer use(my loaner kits.) It may not be the best by todays standards but it was highly regarded in its time.

It will be the best gear she has and I believe it will serve her very well until we get her some high end gear( I may take her on a shopping spree lol.)

Sometimes as we all know gear purchases can be somewhat of a crap shoot.

As far as trying to resale a Vango tent here I wouldn't expect to fetch top dollar for it in the US.

People are most certainly more familiar with Hilles here in the US due to the fact that they have more exposure here... which in turn makes them more comfortable on paying a high dollar amount for them. Now If I try and sell a Vango in the UK I may very well fetch a higher dollar than I would here. 

Take for instance the Ferrino High Lab tents, the msrps on these tents is pretty high(some are $600 and up.) Are they as good as Hille? Who knows, I have yet to see one but I plan on it. Maybe they are better...

Let's say(hypothetically) they are a better over-all tent. If I was to put a $600 Hille, and a $600 Ferrino on Ebay which one do you think would fetch the most money? The Hille even though it is the lesser tent. It all has to do with exposure, the name... and availability.

I am seriously curious if alot of these companies made their way into the US if Hille would be as well respected as they actually are. Like I said previously... 

"When you don't have any real competition in a region you are definitely going to be "well respected" in regards to the products you produce." 

4:53 p.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
2 reviewer rep
690 forum posts

I feel bad about starting this thread......

5:09 p.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
367 forum posts

why do you feel bad?  It's a good discussion.

5:16 p.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
1,238 forum posts

Babokulu said:

BTW, the previous post was a reply too Robert Rowe's question. I guess I need to type faster! 

 Thank you, Babokulu !

Exactly the answer I was seeking.   Your prompt research and providing those links is much appreciated.

                                                         ~r2~

5:24 p.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
1,238 forum posts

@Rick-Pittsburgh ~~ 


Get with me, via the PM deal.   I have some cool female-specific gear I keep on hand for a few of my girlfriends, should they wish to accompany me ( not all at the same time, however.   It's kinda like "juggling chainsaws" anyhow, just managing this scenario. )

Looking forward to a hiking foray with you.   Can bring some of this gear along.   Perhaps (?) your sister can be in our party ....

                                                 ~r2~

6:18 p.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
1,633 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

Robert Rowe said:

@Rick-Pittsburgh ~~ 


Get with me, via the PM deal.   I have some cool female-specific gear I keep on hand for a few of my girlfriends, should they wish to accompany me ( not all at the same time, however.   It's kinda like "juggling chainsaws" anyhow, just managing this scenario. )

Looking forward to a hiking foray with you.   Can bring some of this gear along.   Perhaps (?) your sister can be in our party ....

                                                 ~r2~

 I don't see why not. She seems to be very interested in this type of activity. She wants to go on my typical 80 miler with me for her first trip. I will prolly hack the major majority of the gear being I don't want to put her thru the wringer just yet. I want to see how she holds up. 

8:29 p.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
1,238 forum posts

Boots, Rick, boots.

You're gonna have to really help her in this department.

We all know how important this is going to be.  Plus, she'll need some 'break-in' time on 'em.

                                                        ~r2~

8:41 p.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
1,633 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

Oh trust me when I say she will most certainly be covered in this aspect... With a nice shiny new pair of... AIR JORDANS.... J/K

9:45 p.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
1,236 forum posts

CWF said:

I feel bad about starting this thread......

CWF, I for one am glad that you started this thread and how it has turned out.  I'm always one to stand in the way and ask the question "why".  In this case I stand and ask the question, why do people spend so much money on a tent brand that "I" truly do not believe is not worth the money that they are asking?  In this case it's Hilleberg, tomorrow it will be some one else.  The American public seems to enjoy a certian amount of protectionism and tends towards nationalism when it comes to buying things.  I often hear people wanting to have more choices, but when offerd more choices many almost always buy what they have been using in the past or what has been made in the good old USA before doing diligant research and buying the best product for the money.  I never buy something for its resale value (unless I'm buying someithing to sell on ebay). I buy for the precived value it will have over the rest of my life.   I buy it with plans to keep it for life.  Even with tents I have only sold one tent my whole life.  I welcome the introduction of all new tent companies and anything else of quality that we come up with, so that I can make wiser and better choices so that in the end I get a better value for my money.  More choices should cause lower prices for a better product.  It's kind funny, or sad really, but it seems that were not finding anything new and innovative in the United States, nothing unless I'm missing something.   All the new finds are comming from over seas.  Whether we like it or not  we (USA) have been left in the dust and I will not be denied the finest the world has to offer.  With ever expanding R&D in our industry the world is about to offer some much more, way cool,  fun stuff and I will not be denied just cause people get stuck on one product or another.  It takes alot of time, energy, luck, R&D, vision, etc......... to stay at the top of the heap and I truly think that just cause Hilleberg is the darling child of the USA right now they might not be there for long if just one of the many fine companies can pick up where they have left off.  It will be hard to stay at the top if they keep making tents with such glaring flaws.  Again, I think they make quality tents that only need a little tweeking but my experiance is that companies are some times very snobby and unwilling to listen to the fact that some of there products have  flaws (Don't get me started on the BMW motorcycle thing).  Time will be the best judge but I'm with Rick on this one as far as discovering new companies.  I believe that the best is yet to come and that includes Tents and all the different types of gear that we use.

 *******The best tent has not even been invented yet*******

 I long for it's arrival

11:40 p.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
RETAILER
8 reviewer rep
210 forum posts

I sincerely commend all of you for your high level of maturity.

Any forum thread this long over at backpacker.com would have now resorted to name-calling and personal threats.  

You guys are certainly a breath of fresh air!

On another point, I was on the forums way back when Hilleberg was new to the USA and getting bludgeoned to death at that time.  I admire the way that they have excelled here in this country.  They are now a really big hit with the hunting market, among others.

One of the things that attracted me to Hilleberg (I could say Petra, 'cause she is gorgeous!) was the modesty and the integrity of the family and their passion for quality.  Great, great people.  I had the opportunity to backpack with them in the Uinta Mtn Range 5 years ago prior to an OR Show here in SLC and there are none finer.

11:50 p.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
1,633 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

Hey vigilguy, my thing is I would really like to see some of the other European companies get more exposure here in the US. I am not necessarily sure about the "red tape" that would be encountered with this type of thing but nevertheless I would definitely like to see the spectrum of high end tents get broadened a bit as far as exposure and availability here in the states. 

Out of curiosity, does alot of this have to do with US fire code requirements for fabric, etc?

11:55 p.m. on August 30, 2011 (EDT)
RETAILER
8 reviewer rep
210 forum posts

Rick-Pittsburgh said:

Hey vigilguy, my thing is I would really like to see some of the other European companies get more exposure here in the US. I am not necessarily sure about the "red tape" that would be encountered with this type of thing but nevertheless I would definitely like to see the spectrum of high end tents get broadened a bit as far as exposure and availability here in the states. 

Out of curiosity, does alot of this have to do with US fire code requirements for fabric, etc?

 I agree with you completely.  More competition keeps the mfgrs honest.  As I said earlier, I have really gotten a kick out of your findings!

I have never heard of any issues with the U.S. fire code requirements, I do not know.  I do know that there are tons of tent mfgrs that show up at the OR Shows. I always like to do comparison shopping there.  They have a tent city set up outside where one can walk around and in the different tents that are set up.

12:05 a.m. on August 31, 2011 (EDT)
1,633 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

I have seen video of those, haven't had the chance to go to one. They also have a bunch of those over seas as well.

I am just wondering why there aren't so many other companies here. Hmmmm.... 

I am such an inquisitive bugger.

On a side note I Goggled Petra Hilleberg pics and around the 18th row down is a pic of Tipi....

3:14 p.m. on August 31, 2011 (EDT)
MODERATOR REVIEW CORPS
658 reviewer rep
2,137 forum posts

Rick-Pittsburgh said:

On a side note I Goggled Petra Hilleberg pics and around the 18th row down is a pic of Tipi....

 Haha, that's too funny! I've got to go see that :)

3:21 p.m. on August 31, 2011 (EDT)
MODERATOR REVIEW CORPS
658 reviewer rep
2,137 forum posts

Yep, there are actually three pics of Tipi, and one of his Stiaka in the snow on Cold Spring Gap :) It also brings up an photo of vigilguy.

That gave me a good chuckle!

3:22 p.m. on August 31, 2011 (EDT)
1,633 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts

I was kinda caught off guard by it... I mean Tipi's facial hair looks so real...

I guess thats what I get for "Goggling" when I should have been  GOOGLING !!! :)

7:25 p.m. on August 31, 2011 (EDT)
RETAILER
8 reviewer rep
210 forum posts

You can also find a bigger image of that photo at left on the mchalepacks.com site.  That is my SCMII McHale pack.

April 23, 2014
Quick Reply

Please sign in to reply

 
More Topics
This forum: Older: Now this is a great color for a Hilleberg Nammatj Newer: Hilleberg Soulo Video
All forums: Older: SVEA 123 stove Newer: Mountain Bike Touring / Backpacking in SoCal