Anchoring

12:37 p.m. on May 25, 2010 (EDT)
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The small Pelican 8' kayak I bought has no options for using an anchor. My question is this....it has a small hole in the center front of the kayak. Could I put a thin rope through this hole and on the under side of the hull attach a small 5 lb. weight. I would have to pull the rope up tight to the bottom of the hull and pin the anchor in that position if I wanted to move and then just release the rope and let it slide back down when I wanted to anchor. Do you think that would work?

5:14 p.m. on May 25, 2010 (EDT)
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Are you talking about doing this on a river, or lake? Never anchor off the port or starboard sides in moving water. Bow or stern only. I'd prefer to go from the bow for easier access to the lines. The center hole sounds like a great idea in theory, but in moving water your boat may be inclined to turn perpendicular to the current, causing a downstream capsize. Also, if you plan to paddle w/ the anchor below board (through the center hole) you would experience a great deal of drag, making it very difficult to paddle. You also run the risk of snagging the anchor on underwater obstacles

Here's one way. I thought about doing this, but since I think fishing is a tremendous waste of time (please, no nasty messages, I just don't have the patience) I passed.

http://www.ultimatekayakfishing.com/articles/kayak-rigging/anchor-trolley.html

7:57 p.m. on May 25, 2010 (EDT)
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Thanks for the responce, I will only be using this kayak on the back bays of lakes. No moving water, no main lake areas, this craft is much too small for any moving water. I do not want to drill any holes in the boat either. I was thinking about using epoxy to glue on some cleats, but they would have to be plastic for the glue to hold. Probably not a good idea. I will try my idea and let you know how it works. I don't plan on moving around too much while fishing, it is just to get me off the banks that are very full of cotton mouths.

10:22 p.m. on May 25, 2010 (EDT)
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If your boat is poly, no glue will hold. When poly boats get a small hole in the hull, they can't be glued. They must be heat repaired with a poly stick, much like the p-tex base of a ski. http://www.plentypupule.com/weldkit.htm

9:28 a.m. on May 26, 2010 (EDT)
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The owner manual says it is made of Ram-X, it also said paint will not stick to it if I tried to repaint if. So just to make sure I won't make any changes to it at all. Looks like there is more to this than just floating around fishing.

1:11 p.m. on May 26, 2010 (EDT)
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Do you have carry loops at the bow and stern? If so, you may be able to do something w/ them, or the hole they are looped through, to attach a pulley or anchor pivot, eliminating any permanent changes to the boat itself.

9:18 p.m. on May 26, 2010 (EDT)
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Hey!

I have an idea!

Mike apprentices me for a few bucks to learn how to make those rods!

I have wrapped my own guides in a kit, Mike, so I do have that going for me. I am not helpless or with-out some skills.

It could earn boat anchor money!

:)

9:44 a.m. on May 27, 2010 (EDT)
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Noddlehead, do what I did, buy a book and a video and you can teach yourself how to build bamboo rods.

7:40 p.m. on May 27, 2010 (EDT)
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I do not mean to derail your thread but could you post the the book and video, Mike?

9:04 p.m. on May 27, 2010 (EDT)
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Fundamentals of Building a Bamboo Fly-Rod by George Maurer is the book to use and the video is by Russ Gooding, Golden Witch, he has two one for building and the second is for finishing. Of course I researched the net for a year before I spent around $1500 for the tooling. A great site is the Classis Rod Forum, the BambooRod Buildingforum.com to name a few. It is not rocket science!!! I spent years in college and could not get a job, I bought a $50 book and spent the last 15 years of my life fixing computers.

10:39 p.m. on May 27, 2010 (EDT)
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As a site admin of another forum I have an issue with derailing threads, But thanks for the great info. (So I do not wish to derail this one.)


I love working with my hands and a friend showed me a bamboo fly-rod, not long ago, stored in his moms garage for 30 to 40 years. It had been his granddads. The poor rod was ready to fall apart.

Kind of got the wheels spinning about making them.


Thanks!

10:13 a.m. on May 28, 2010 (EDT)
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If you lived near me, I would let you build one in my shop. It really is not that hard to do.

5:17 p.m. on May 28, 2010 (EDT)
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If you lived near me, I would let you build one in my shop. It really is not that hard to do.

I would love the opportunity and thanks for the offer.

9:35 p.m. on May 28, 2010 (EDT)
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Welcome to Trailspace Mike,

Noddlehead I'll do it for you, haha.

I have an affinity for old things / ways, and bamboo rods have always intrigued me. I have fished with one several times, but have never dolled out the cash for one. I bet you are proud of you work, I would be.

f klock is correct about anchoring technique, I once watched helpless as a buddies canoe capsized on a windy lake because he anchored with a rope tied to his seat thwart.

I was not clear on the location of your hole, are you saying the hole is located on the center of the bow, all the way up front.

10:33 a.m. on May 29, 2010 (EDT)
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Trouthunter, the book says these holes are for self bailing. One is located in the rear and the other midship. This kayak sits very low in the water, I only have about and inch or so above the water line. In my opion it will flip very easy, so I have given up on the idea of an anchor. I only paid $150 for it at Dicks, so as I have always said...you only get what you pay for. I'll use it for a while and get a better one if I don't drown myself in the meantime.

1:32 p.m. on May 29, 2010 (EDT)
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Those are called scupper holes. Definitely don't want anything pulled up tight against the hull when putting in/taking out. You should be fine anchoring in calm backwaters, but not current or in crowded waters with wakes hitting the boat. Installing a nylon cleat is pretty simple. Cleat, stainless hardware and a few tools.

3:17 p.m. on June 2, 2010 (EDT)
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This is the boat I bought, you see the holes in the center line. I am getting a little more confident in it. It does sit very low in the water. But I will only be using in it back water areas, no moving water at all. Thanks for all the suggestions.

7:43 p.m. on June 2, 2010 (EDT)
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Looks kinda like a surf yak being that shallow. Should be fairly stable being shorter and fatter. Should be easy to turn, but not a great tracker.

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