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Solo hiking transportation

4:11 a.m. on May 17, 2012 (EDT)
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First off i have been out of the game since i was 20( now 32) and looking to get back into hiking and backpacking, the reason i haven't gone before is because i didnt want to go alone...now i dont care just want to get back at it.

So as i was planning our several trips to do i realized another problem, unless the trail is a loop or i hike back on the same trail i would need to figure out transportation to the trailhead i started at. Not a huge issue to hike back, but wondering what other options there may be... 

That may sound like a beginner question but considering how long its been and the fact i have never gone solo thats what i am

7:14 a.m. on May 17, 2012 (EDT)
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There are several solutions.  One is to park and NOT do a loop but go in and come out the same way.  OR more rarely, find a loop from your car in and wrapping around in a circle back to your car---rare because most areas do not have such a series of trails.  But some do---example---Park at Big Fat Gap in Slickrock wilderness (NC)and hike down to Slickrock creek and up the Nutbuster to Four Mile Ridge and over to Hangover Mt and out on Hangover Lead South to the car.  A good loop.

Another option is to arrange a shuttle either with a loved one or friend (have them drop you off and pick you up later at a different spot).  This works well on long trips.  OR google up your area and figure out if there's someone pulling shuttles and park at their house and have them provide ingress and egress, etc.  This will probably include $$.

Finally, there's always the hitchhiking option from your house out and back, which is a bee-atch and only used in extreme poverty when you have to get out no matter what---preferably on a long trip.

2:00 p.m. on May 17, 2012 (EDT)
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I'm a fan of mixing bikes and public transportation to get to solo hikes.

2:22 p.m. on May 17, 2012 (EDT)
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I know a few people, that, in the old days take a  drive up to the ending trail head of their trip, drop off and lock a bike to a tree off trail so that the bike would be there when they were done with their trip.   They could then ride their bike back to the car. Depending on how much gear you have with you will of course be a deciding factor if you have to stash your pack and then come back with the car to get your pack. This method was quite effective when rafting. If you have a friend that is willing to help you drop your car at the end and then give you a ride back to the starting trailhead that is also another way of doing it. Again this was also employed with great success while rafting a river.

4:57 p.m. on May 17, 2012 (EDT)
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I know a few people, that, in the old days take a  drive up to the ending trail head of their trip, drop off and lock a bike to a tree off trail so that the bike would be there when they were done with their trip.   They could then ride their bike back to the car.

I heard of a guy that was doing/did that to hike the AT. Each summer he would do a section by day hiking.  Leave the bike where he camped then drive to his next camp and hike back to the bike and bike to his camp.

5:06 p.m. on May 17, 2012 (EDT)
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One could always park at the th, hike in and then do a 180 and slog back out in the direction ya came from. 

Everything looks a little different when viewing it from another angle. :)

I am going to do another solo run of the LHHT in June or July(haven't decided) sobo and when I get to the last shelter area switch to a nobo approach and hammer back to the sobo th. 

I am looking at a 140 miles give or take miles. 

Should be a fun trip.

8:40 p.m. on May 17, 2012 (EDT)
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TY all the main trip I am looking at would be a section of the North Country Trail in MN (the Laurentian Lakes chapter section) 


NCT.png

It is a 35 mile section was thinking 3 days one way or if I couldn't find transportation back to my car or arranged prior a 7 day hike. Probably a little slow but if I finish faster that is better than not finishing in time and needing more food...that and like I said I am just getting back into it so it seems reasonable to me.

How many miles do you guys who go on long expeditions average a day?

8:51 p.m. on May 17, 2012 (EDT)
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I personally average around 15/day sometimes more but have done upwards of 30 on a few occasions.

This is also dependent upon season(ie snowshoes), how technical the terrain is, so on and so forth.  

9:54 p.m. on May 17, 2012 (EDT)
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This is an interesting conundrum and one which I have had difficulties with for many years. Most of the treks that really interest me tend to be in relatively remote areas where there is no public transport and not much private traffic, so, even "hitching a ride" is problematic.

The superb "Earl Grey Pass" trail in the Kootenay region of BC is one example and it can be a REAL @@#%#^& to get there, trek across it for a week and then get home, as the highway system involves hundreds of miles between the two endpoints of this trail.

I have done a number of multi-day trips on it and solo-crossed it the first time in the late '70s, taking five days to cross, IIRC and then returning and "hitchhiking" about 100 miles home. This,was an early summer trip and it rained much of the time, while the trail was very over-grown with Alders, Cedars and the horrible plant known as "Devil's Club".

It was quite the amusing experience, to walk into my bookstore laden with my Synergy Works Expedition Pack and a bit grubby in my knickers and bush shirt to encounter several good customers who were used to meeting me clad in a 3-piece business suit, tie and meticulously groomed. But, given the nature of my mountain home town, incidents such as this happen and one sees surgeons clad in mountain clothing in the local hospital.

So, my longtime fantasy has been to afford to have two 4x4s to leave one at each end of some of the long, wild trails so I could access them without a lot of wasted time trying to find a ride. Someday.............

12:03 a.m. on May 18, 2012 (EDT)
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I check out the local general store near my starting point, and ask if they know a local willing to make some money, helping me shuttle my car to my end point, then drive me back to the start point.  You may waste a day setting this up, but it always worked for me.

Ed

8:15 a.m. on May 18, 2012 (EDT)
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Have a friend follow you to the end, park your car there, and then have them drive you to the start and drop you off. Your car will be at the end waiting for you.

My wife does this for me alot, otherwise i just double back.

April 24, 2014
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