18 Days In The October Mountains

9:44 a.m. on October 25, 2011 (EDT)
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I know, I know, my trips are repetitive---I'm not out in the Bob Marshall or Yellowstone or the Cascades or Glacier or the Beartooths or the Sangre de Cristos---I'm back in the Citico/Slickrock.  It's close to home, and while the trips remain the same, the pictures are different and taken in a different month:  OCTOBER!!  And sometimes I even use different gear.  So here we go---

HIGHLIGHTS  TRIP 126---Oct 4--21, 2011

**  18 DAYS IN THE OCTOBER MOUNTAINS

**  THE TEXAS BOYS

**  FIRST TIME ON THE WINDY GAP TRAIL

**  RAINSTORM AT SADDLE TREE GAP

**  SKID IN THE CLEARCUT

**  WITH JOHN QUILLEN AND THE SOUTHERN HIGHLANDERS

**  WITH PATMAN ON SADDLE TREE GAP

**  WINDSTORM ON FOUR MILE RIDGE

**  HOPPIN JOHN AND HOOTYHOO

**  BACKPACKING WITH HOOTYHOO INTO THE WEDGE

**  8TH TIME ON THE BRUSH MOUNTAIN TRAIL

**  BUTT COLD STORM ON THE SOUTH FORK CITICO

**  COLD FEET AND 9 CROSSINGS ON GRASSY BRANCH

**  LAST NIGHT ON FLATS MOUNTAIN


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Little Mitten and I drive up the Cherohala Skyway to 4,600 feet at Beech Gap where I unload a 90 lb pack for 18 days in the mountains of TN and NC.


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90 lbs you say??  I could list the weights but then my head would explode.  Suffice it to say I have five books, 32 oz of fuel, and a near full winter kit including a down jacket and pants along with too much food.


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Ye olde faithful Keron tent tags along for the ride.  3.2 miles in I dump the "gun safe" and set up camp at Barrel Gap on Trail 149.


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NeoAir All Season Pad---I vowed never to buy the cheap and flimsy looking NeoAir but when they come out with the 5R All Season with the beefier denier cover I have to try it out.  Of course, it passed the "week in the backyard" test and so here it is with me on Day 1 of a long trip.  Keep your finger's crossed.


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The North Fork Texans---On Day 2 I run into four backpackers from Dallas TX pulling their annual trip.  I leave Trail 149 and hook into the North Fork Citico trail and pass their camp.  Their original plan was to descend the NF and do the South Fork loop, but I convince them with the help of their map to follow me up to Bob's Bald, a six mile day for me with a climb of about 1,200 feet---kicked my sac with day two weight.


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On the trail to the Bob with the boys.


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I make it to the top after a hard climb and set up at Raven Camp while the boys set up below by the big firepit.


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On Day 3 I say goodbye to the boys and fall off the mountain and in 1.5 miles I reach a reststop where I hang out with a newt.  Three miles later I stay on Trail 149 and reach Dean Camp where I set up the old lodgeskins.  This is an excellent campsite with a branch of the NF Citico flowing right by. The weather has so far been outstanding.


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Before I leave the Texas boys they souvenir me a pak of dehydrated ice cream---weird.


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Back on the North Fork---On Day 4 I follow Trail 149 back to the NF and it sure feels good to be back on NF Creek where the air is clean and the moss is green.


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At the trail jct with 149 and the North Fork I turn right and head up the trail to the open bowl below Cherry Log Gap and set up the tent at Snake Mt Camp on the one level spot in a steep bowl.


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Crowder Camp---On Day 5 I make it to Crowders after about six miles but this time I stay on the ridge and not at the lower camp by the creek.


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At midnight I brew up some hot tea with honey---chamomile of course.


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Day 6---Geared up to hike I stay on Fodderstack Ridge with a full water load and prepare to leave camp and pull the four hills north past familiar landmarks before I find a level campsite close to the one and only water spring on this part of the Fodderstack trail.


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I wanted to find a campsite close to the spring but not too close to Farr Gap and here's what I found---a level little pull off next to the trail where the ridge and the trail meet.  It's home for Day 6.


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Fourteen trailworkers from the American Hiking Society and the Crosscut Mountain Boys gather at Farr Gap for a run down the Stiffknee trail.  Rick Harris is on the left and Ken Jones is on the right---he's the king of the area trails.


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I leave Farr Gap and descend the Stiffknee trail and turn right at Slickrock Creek where there is this crossing taking me to a campsite at the Nichols Cove jct.


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Buffalo Rock---I set Day 7's camp by this rock and come back to wash off an overheated body, head and scalp.


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Buffalo Rock Camp on Slickrock Creek by the Nichols Cove trail jct.


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Dusk comes with burning trash in a very light rain.  It's goodnight to Day 7.


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A long wet day---On Day 8 I leave Slickrock Creek and climb up the Nichols Cove trail and cross eight times to arrive at this fine camp below the twin gravesite.  I'm slowly moving up 3,000 feet to Hangover Mt where I hope to see fellow backpacker and Trailspace member Gonzan, among others.


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IN MEMORY OF SHUNKA DOG---The last time I was at this Nichols Cove campsite Shunka was with me and here he is posing at the same campsite.  It brings back memories.


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Day 9---The Nichols Cove trail climbs steeply to this trailpost at Windy Gap.  From here I take the Windy Gap trail and climb a series of hills to arrive at Big Fat Gap where I load up 52 oz of water and decide to pull another thousand feet to Elysium Fields, a gap below Hangover Mt.  It's a long day of backpacking with 2,000 feet gained.


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Here's my camp in the fog at around 4,000 feet in Elysium Fields.


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On Day 10 I leave the high gap of Elysium Fields and climb up the Hangover Lead South trail to the top of Hangover Mt.  Here is a scene along the trail where I stop to get water.


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At the top of the mountain I set up this camp in Saddle Tree Gap which is an exposed knife ridge camp close to the Hangover overlook.  It's here I spend all of Day 10 caught in a nasty rain and windstorm with horizontal peltings and high wind gusts, causing me to use 14 pegs to guy out the tent.

It's the kind of weather no sane person would use a tarp and I'm expecting to see Gonzan up here to join me on Day 11?  While stuck in the all night maelstrom I write this little trail journal account:

"Right now we wait cuz there's nothing outside this tent except the hellish twirling dance of a happy woman of the wind.  She brings the predictable combo of horizontal rain and loud inescapable wind, I bring the predictable Hilleberg tent.  We both meet in the middle, her with her gear and me with my gear, and we swap days of show and tell."

"She's not out to eat my tent and I'm not out to do something stupid like suckling on booze so together we should have a rough but amicable dance.  My only job is to stay put and survive with some style and decorum, her only job is to blow our minds.  Her business card reads---"Blowing Minds For 5 Billion Years"."

"I'm just one more set of eyeballs peering out on her trip, one set of trillions since the beginning.  She loves an audience and the only applause she requires is seeing the beauty and sleeping with it.  We clap with our bag nights and the newts do the same under rocks and rotten logs.  They're in their little forest tents hearing the wind and the rain, I join them in my kerlon cave."

"The pigs and bears peer out tonight from different little nests and dens and forts and some are even dumb enough to be as high on the mountain as me.  No normal mammal would be sleeping this storm off on this ridge, no big mammal, and so I share it with chipmunks and squirrels and voles."

"Somewhere on this mountain the ravens sit, some may even be in the sky, but they are the dedicated hard core types, the ones who stand guard and observe it all, the mountain kings.  They see it all.  They see the clearcut fanatics and the firepit drunks and the huddled wet hikers and the frightened cold campers."

"They see all this from a distance and rarely do they intervene.  You'll know it when they do.  This land is ruled by the ravens, they are the tribe you must watch for when entering their territory.  If the humans wipe out the ravens the land will not have a king and then no matter what the humans do they'll always be apart from the land and severed from the spirit of life."

"When you kill the king you kill yourself.  The ravens are out right now and they fly in the storm like fish in water.  They work hand in hand with Miss Nature and they see me here at Saddle Tree Gap and they see Skid over there in his nylon lump and they see what we're up to and what's our intent and how long we've been out and where we call home."

"This is their home and while we are out it's also our home and they know this.  They are kings to the Queen and they do it out of love.  If you know this you won't have any problems out here.  If you don't know this you'll never feel content and you'll come in here just to get back out.  The only way to know this is to see the kings of the land you roam and see them not to hunt them but see them when they decide to show themselves to you."

"Up here it's the ravens, somewhere else it's the grizzlies or the moose or the eagles.  It's hard to get their vision, they require everything and so every long backpacking trip becomes a sort of vision quest.  We are not alone out here, even on a night like this.

MORE TO COME ON DAY 11

10:23 a.m. on October 25, 2011 (EDT)
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I never get tired of this stuff. Great Trip report, thanks.

10:47 a.m. on October 25, 2011 (EDT)
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DAY 12 MORNING AFTER THE STORM---After the big rainstorm I wake to a safe and secure tent covered in wet leaves.  The day turns clear and sunny.


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JOHN QUILLEN AND UNCLE FUNGUS---John organizes the annual Southern Highlander pilgrimage to Hangover Mt and so we meet again after a couple years since his Mill Gap trip.


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Trailspace member Patman shows up on the mountain and gets introduced to John and gets to see the Hangover rock and then sets up camp close to me so I go and visit before dark.  Our Trailspace trip reports will overlap.


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On Day 12 I pack up the gear and leave my camp and visit John Quillen and the Southern Highlanders.  Patman joins me and brings his miniature guitar along with his regular kit.


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Patman atop Hangover Rock.


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Hoppin John and Larry on the Hangover---My old backpacking buddy Hoppin John makes a surprise visit as he pulls a three day backpacking trip with his friend Larry.  They end up camping three miles away on the Bob and it's where I end up eventually.


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Flying the outlaw flag of the Southern Highlanders.  Check out their website---

http://southernhighlanders.com/


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I hoof it from the Hangover and in three miles I'm atop Gorak Hill at 5,300 feet and run into my old backpacking buddy Hootyhoo pulling a seven day trip with his army gear.


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Hoppin John joins Hootyhoo and dog Rooty as we sit and jaw atop Gorak Hill.  A great reunion of like minded sorts.


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To stay with the group I set up again atop Raven Camp on Gorak Hill.


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The morning of Day 13---Hoppin John's tent as he prepares to pack.


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Larry in his Hilleberg Allak tent bolted down for the all night wind.


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Here is Hoppin John rolling up his Exped downmat.


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Hoppin John uses the same exact pack as me, a Mystery Ranch G6000, and he's preparing to throw it on.


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Phillip, Larry and Hoppin John preparing to shove off on a 3+ mile hike and a thousand foot drop to Beech Gap and out.


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Hootyhoo and I backpack together off the mountain and he shows me a new route on the tractor trail which descends into the wedge and passes over Bob Creek where we get water before climbing to Cold Gap for the night.  He sets up his tarp and I set up the Keron as shown.


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Day 14 begins with a visit to Hootyhoo's tarp camp in Cold Gap which caught a breeze from yesterday and it stayed with us into the morning.


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I leave Hoot and pull trail 149 where I stop at the Brush Mt trailpost for a rest.  Yes, I'm back on the Brush Mt trail for the 8th time and it's a long hard slog.  Near the bottom of the "hardest trail in the Citico" I reach this 1917 model A engine block.  See, my pack is bigger than an engine block!


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The water jug fits precisely.


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And like my last trip I set up at the end of the Brush Mt trail in a big campsite next to South Fork Creek where Brush Creek jcts with its bigger brother.  The next day I must cross the cold SF in crocs.


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CROSSING THE NORTH FORK CITICO---After 19 crossings on a roundabout route (going up the NF and down the NF on a three mile jaunht), I end up back on the South Fork trail where I set up at White Rock Camp.  Here I am on the North Fork trail.


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Day 15's site at White Rock Camp on the South Fork Citico.


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Autumn on the South Fork.


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A butt cold rain greets me at the beginning of Day 16 and so I stay put in the tent which is a big yellow tube of warmth, space and comfort.  The rain is supposed to turn to snow the next day so I need to pack and move higher up the mountain but it's too hard leaving a cozy camp in a late October rain, so I zero out the day.


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Uncle Fungus surveys his camp on a cold wet zero day.  Yes, I stay put all day and wait out the storm.


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I survey the high water of the South Fork Citico.  Glad I don't have to cross this.


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But I do have to cross this 9 times---Grassy Branch Creek.


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Crossing #6 on Grassy Branch---easy enough.  Notice I'm wearing my boots which is much easier than just crocs, but it results in a long day of hiking with cold feet in ambients of around 35F.


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Camp Hope atop Flats Mountain at 4,000 feet.  It's cold up here boys!  And a long slog from the South Fork.


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How cold is it?  See me in my goose down jacket and pants.  Let's warm up for a final night in the TN backcountry.


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All packed up and ready to leave Flats Mt for my evac point.  Check out the Icebreaker tops with the zip necks and the sleeve thumb holes---nice.


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Out!!  And waiting for Little Mitten to pick me up at the Lakeview Overlook.  My trail journal ends with the usual bluster:

"SO GO ON BOYS AND COME OUT WITHOUT ME AND SLEEP IN THE COLD AND MAYBE YOU'LL SEE SNOW AND A BLIZZARD OR TWO WITH HIGH WINDS UNDER A TENT-EATING SKY IF YOU'RE LUCKY ON HIGH TRAILS AND MOUNTAINTOPS DIFFICULT TO REACH AS YOU CRAWL ON HANDS AND KNEES WITH A HEAVY PACK PUSHING YOU TO THE GROUND WHILE YOUR PROTECTIVE CUPS SLIDE OFF AND MISS NATURE GREASES YOU DOWN FOR A DELIGHTFUL NOVEMBER REAMING AS YOU MUMBLE "TWERN'T SENSELESS TO STAY TOWN-BOUND SO'S WE'S COME TO GET TESTED BY CONDITIONS OUTSIDE OUR RANGE OF DEMOTIONS NONE FOR NAUGHT SO STEPS OUT'S THE WAY IF'N YOU VALUE YOURN HAIR AND DOAN WANNA SEE IT LIFTED HAR HAR HAR" AND SO YOU'RE READY FOR A BOUT AND A ROMP WITH THE WOMAN IN GREEN AND WHITE AND WIND AND COLD IN A BIG BED OF HONEYMOON DELIGHTS WHICH CAN JUST AS EASILY KILL YOU AS MAKE YOU GOOFY AND BEGGING FOR MORE OR JUST DEAD IN THE BACK OF BEYOND ON SOME SAC-EATING TRAIL WHILST BLOWDOWNS REMOVE ORGANS AND TANGLED BRUSH EMASCULATES THE WELL HUNG VAGABONDS WHO ARE OUT TRYING TO EMULATE UNCLE FUNGUS WHO THEY'LL PROBABLY MEET SOMEDAY CURLED IN A FETAL BALL WEEPING DUE TO THE COLD SO PACK YOUR KIT AND HE'LL SEE YOU IN THE GREAT GREEN CHURCH OF THE CITICO/SLICKROCK."


























11:41 a.m. on October 25, 2011 (EDT)
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I was sad I missed you up there, Tipi.  I pulled into Saddle Tree very, very late on Saturday after you had headed on up to the Bob. I decided to hike in from Big Fat, as I've never hiked from that point before. I wish we had just decided to hump in from Beech Gap now. Ah well, c'est la vie 

Here's the report from our hike:

http://www.trailspace.com/forums/trip-reports/topics/103208.html

12:04 p.m. on October 25, 2011 (EDT)
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Hey Gonzan---thanks for the link and it's good to see your brother out and about as I remember him from last time.  I spent two days at Saddle Tree Gap and decided to head up to the Bob on the day you pulled in---so sorry I missed you.  Coming in from Big Fat is a long haul and a 2,000 foot climb.

12:33 p.m. on October 25, 2011 (EDT)
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Hey welcome back Tipi!

Excellent report as always. Your pictures turned out really well. So did you eat that funky ice cream?

PS I really enjoyed meeting you on the mountain…you are the only famous backpacker I’ve ever met, lol…well I guess I’ve now also met John Quillen but he’s not on Trailspace…  J

Here is my overlap report also:

http://www.trailspace.com/forums/trip-reports/topics/103119.html

1:43 p.m. on October 25, 2011 (EDT)
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Patman---We Return.

No comment on the ice cream . . .

The only people who think I'm famous are You and Me so don't tell anyone else.


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What Patman fails to mention is that I never got up from this position and spent 15 days frozen with the Anvil balanced correctly as shown.  I wanted to be air-lifted out as per current trends but instead broke free and finished the trip, etc.

4:26 p.m. on October 25, 2011 (EDT)
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Tipi Walter said:

What Patman fails to mention is that I never got up from this position and spent 15 days frozen with the Anvil balanced correctly as shown.  I wanted to be air-lifted out as per current trends but instead broke free and finished the trip, etc.

 HAHAHAHA!

Oh, I just noticed, you are pulling the "hernia-roll" maneuver just about right where my brother set up his tent. He wondered what that strange smell was ;) 

7:31 p.m. on October 26, 2011 (EDT)
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Great trip report as always!!! Great photos!!

Thanks Tipi!!!

2:04 a.m. on October 29, 2011 (EDT)
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The first picture says it all--the pack looks bigger than the trunk of that Ford AND Ms Mitten together!  Thanks for sharing.

10:17 p.m. on October 30, 2011 (EDT)
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I was day-hiking up Spencer Mtn there in the NE GSMNP one day last summer, before I'd ever heard of trailspace.  There, I came across a threesome of classy people who looked like they were wilderness wise weekender types.  As we sat and chatted atop the mtn, just under that rickity old fire tower, their faces came aglow with tales of a fellow named Tipi Walter, whom they had "actually met" a year before on the Slickrock.  They talked about you like they'd come across a movie star, and just regretted not getting your autograph.  Don't mean to be disagreeable, but I think there's a bunch o' them folks who have a lot of appreciation for the bridge you've been for them over to the natural world, the way you always teach something by every post you write, and your fame in other places for championing environmental causes.  One of the three--Karen, I think--said "Yeah, he's a big, tall, good-lookin' fellow, too!" 

12:46 a.m. on October 31, 2011 (EDT)
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This is a joke, right?  Last year I competed in a series of backpacking Power Poses (after a full day of pumping nylon) and so maybe the group you mention were in the audience?  It explains my movie star status as evidently they were blown away by the full day of clenchings, as shown below. (Cold Gap wilderness Power Pumping).


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1:07 a.m. on October 31, 2011 (EDT)
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Ha, ha--neat pictures, Tipi; but these folks (and I am sure there are many) were serious.  Trailspace seems to have an abundance of quality people who are a treasure to encounter for intelligent information and wisdom about the trail.  Thanks for answering my post.

8:43 p.m. on October 31, 2011 (EDT)
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Bunion said:

..As we sat and chatted atop the mtn, just under that rickity old fire tower, their faces came aglow with tales of a fellow named Tipi Walter, whom they had "actually met" a year before on the Slickrock.  They talked about you like they'd come across a movie star, and just regretted not getting your autograph...

 Tipi is a star, here's the proof:


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I think he just likes his privacy :)

Ed

9:00 p.m. on October 31, 2011 (EDT)
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HAHAHAHAHA!

Awesome :)

9:25 p.m. on October 31, 2011 (EDT)
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Alas, it's all true.  I did a recent winter trip with a friend who, well, see below:


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I was freezing my buttocks off but my buddy had no problems, not only did he clear the trail for me, he was comfy even in cotton!!  Forget everything I ever posted here on winter layering systems.  He even fought off a big grizzly once bare handed!

8:25 a.m. on November 1, 2011 (EDT)
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He was warm from basking in your aura.  You are still the most interesting man in the world!


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Ed

9:31 a.m. on November 1, 2011 (EDT)
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Dangit, I don't know where you guys are finding these photographs but yes, I do have a life beyond the walls of Trailspace and simple wilderness backpacking.  All I can say is, Stay thirsty my friends.


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12:36 p.m. on November 1, 2011 (EDT)
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GREAT THREAD! And nice trip Tipi! Very entertaining :D

Do you ever get out west? Have you hiked the Sierras or the Cascades? If so what did you think of them compared to your local area?

Wolfman

9:08 p.m. on November 1, 2011 (EDT)
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Wolfman said:

GREAT THREAD! And nice trip Tipi! Very entertaining :D

Do you ever get out west? Have you hiked the Sierras or the Cascades? If so what did you think of them compared to your local area?

Wolfman

 Even though my homebase and my heart apparently is in the Appalachian mountains, I've done several backpacking trips "out west", most notably a one month trip into the Sierras close to Nevada City and the Yuba River.  It was in February/March and what I remember most was a warm snap when it rained for six days straight---misery along with a possible bout of walking pneumonia.  I eventually hitched a ride to Sacramento and found a way back to North Carolina.  Then there was that time I camped next to Lake Michigan and it never got above 0F.

Of course, I'm spoiled by the creases and folds of the Southern Appalachians, where there's always ample water and where a human can find solitude in a million little hollows and tiny creek valleys.

4:50 p.m. on November 2, 2011 (EDT)
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whomeworry said:

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 This pic alone makes me thirsty...

5:03 a.m. on November 3, 2011 (EDT)
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Rick-Pittsburgh said:

 This pic alone makes me thirsty...

 Or jones for a cigar!

Ed

8:35 a.m. on November 3, 2011 (EDT)
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In the above pic, I'm more worried about the guy on the right staring intently . . . . . .


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5:33 p.m. on November 3, 2011 (EDT)
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Oh that guy?  My eyes never made it over to that side of the pic.

Ed

4:05 p.m. on November 4, 2011 (EDT)
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To funny Tipi, getting caught in the "rain" out west, not that funny for you, but...

I mostly have hiked the Olympics and the Cascades, rain is what we call sunshine around here. :) It's fun reading about your winter trips and the snow, for me the snow is normally just thick rain. Never the best stuff to hike in.

Enjoy your mountains, hopefully someday I will be able to get out that way!

Wolfman

4:34 p.m. on November 4, 2011 (EDT)
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Having now spent time out in the Rockies, I can honestly say I find the mountains and flora in the Appalachians much more lovely. Not that one is better than the other, but the Appalachians are to the Rockies as a Beech is to a Bristlecone, as the Moon is to the noon sun.


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5:08 p.m. on November 4, 2011 (EDT)
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gonzan said:

Having now spent time out in the Rockies, I can honestly say I find the mountains and flora in the Appalachians much more lovely. Not that one is better than the other, but the Appalachians are to the Rockies as a Beech is to a Bristlecone, as the Moon is to the noon sun.

One prettier than the other?  I'd say the aesthetics are different.  It is kind of like comparing classic Greek statuary to modern neo realism.  I am sure Gary will defend the elegant austerity of the desert (which often isn't austere at all).  I find some of the vistas of S. Utah’s canyon country to be among the most beautiful and inspiring, Monument Valley, Zion, etc.  And there is something ethereal about the stark silent domes and jagged sky line of the Rockies and High Sierra.

I find a lot of people have a preconception of what comprises a beautiful pastoral; trees, grassy, flower filled meadows, and flowing water.  We are programmed to think this way, and conclude this as fact without ever seeing other types of geography.  When I take people to the deserts and mountains of west for the first time, they usually lament over the lack of greenery, but if they linger and are receptive, they eventually come to appreciate these vistas for their own merits.  Sure there are some absolute barren featureless tracts one usually wants to pass through with minimal pause, just as there are places back east so overgrown its like camping under a pile of raked leaves.  But if one fully develops their palate, the best vistas of their kind compare to the best of any other kind.  But for what it is worth the best vista in my mind's eye is one with a pretty girl in the foreground.  All forms of nature are beautiful.

Ed

5:17 p.m. on November 4, 2011 (EDT)
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Wolfman said:

To funny Tipi, getting caught in the "rain" out west, not that funny for you, but...

I mostly have hiked the Olympics and the Cascades, rain is what we call sunshine around here. :) It's fun reading about your winter trips and the snow, for me the snow is normally just thick rain. Never the best stuff to hike in.

Enjoy your mountains, hopefully someday I will be able to get out that way!

Wolfman

 From what I have heard, your area would be a real test of anyone's kit.  I've seen some youtube vids on Northwest backpacking---the Olympics---and gotta say it looks to be a tough test of motivation to stay out and the ability to stay dry and warm.  We get those conditions here, too , on occasion, but nothing like there.  It's funny to watch conditions go from nice and sunny to two feet of snow and cold and then the next day it rains or sleets on top of the snow all day at around 35F.  Miserable.  I usually just hunker in and call it a zero day in the only thing that's warm and dry---my tent.

5:27 p.m. on November 4, 2011 (EDT)
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Oh, some now Ed :) I didn't say more beautiful I said more lovely, haha! 

Truly though, Lovely has a literal difference in definition, and even larger divergence in connotative meaning. But to illustratively clarify was why I followed the statement up with aesthetic analogies. 

I whole heartedly agree with you: I do not think one is better or more beautiful than another. I fully appreciate different landscapes and conditions, recognizing and even reveling in the aesthetic differences and the manner they effect me. I do not say a Doe is more beautiful, or better, than a  Bull, but I do say it is more lovely :)  

7:15 p.m. on November 4, 2011 (EDT)
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whomeworry said:

He was warm from basking in your aura.  You are still the most interesting man in the world!


tipi01.jpg
Ed

 There is a man in this photo?  I didn't notice.

10:37 a.m. on November 5, 2011 (EDT)
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Of course there's a man in the photo.  The most interesting man in the world.

11:37 a.m. on November 9, 2011 (EST)
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Great trip report Tip Walter. I definetely need to get back east to do some hiking. Have been out west most of my life. last hiking I did was near Lake Placid in 1996. I am originally from upstate New York, but moved south then west in the 1970-80s.

May do another bicycle tour this spring, going towards Florida and up the east coast area. Should be flatter than the rides from Wyoming to Arizona and across Alaska have been since 1982.

4:55 p.m. on November 9, 2011 (EST)
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So what about the September mountains and the November mountains?

10:04 a.m. on November 10, 2011 (EST)
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There pretty nice, too, Gary ;)

November 27, 2014
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