Berg Lake Dayhikes, 2nd September, 2012

4:18 p.m. on September 4, 2012 (EDT)
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Once you reach Berg Lake, there are a number of choices available for hiking. Difficulty ranges from multi-day backpack trips across the passes from British Columbia into Jasper National Park in Alberta to easy walks of just a few hours.

We'd hiked into Berg Lake the day before, and we were looking for some easier walks that wouldn't involve carrying 40 lb backpacks! We'd been looking at a few local 'attractions', trails with scenic destinations, and had picked out one loop that looked promising.


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From our campsite, a creek led upwards with a trail following beside it. image.jpg


image.jpg Nice views on the way up, of course, with Mt Robson and the lake below us.

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After just a short climb, we started getting nice views of something called the Tobaggan Falls, a series of waterfalls and rapids running down a rock slab, but which,while covering a lot of distance, seemed to be unable to decided whether it wanted to be a creek or a waterfall. 


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 Looking up, and looking down.
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image.jpg From the side

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image.jpg Kind of interesting, and quite unique.

The trail turns away from the creek, and we soon came to a junction. Nice spot for a rest, and we got a few photos. Elevation gain to here about 300 metres.


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Our second destination was Hargreaves Glacier and Hargreaves Lake. The alluvial delta we'd crossed coming up comes down from Hargreaves and has created Berg Lake by blocking its outflow, so we were curious to see the source. That meant a steady walk southwest through the top edge of the treeline.

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We re-crossed the creek...
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image.jpg then in and out of the forest.

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Then we met this guy...

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If you've ever met a porcupine, you'll know they aren't very fast. I had no inclination to pass him (and there wasn't a lot of room), but he seemed to prefer waddling away down the path in front of us. We tried making noises so he'd head off into the forest, but all that did was make him waddle a bit faster.

Kind of like being stuck behind farm equipment on a busy highway, all we could do is sit back and enjoy the scenery. It was nice, but it was a slow walk.
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As we neared the moraines guarding Hargreaves glacier, the porcupine decided the bush was more pleasant than being followed by a bunch of hikers and we were finally able to get by.
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We hiked to the top of the moraine overlooking the lake...
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and were greeted with these spectacular views:


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A nice spot to stop for lunch, and we paused for half-an-hour before heading back down to return to the lake.
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Then an easy walk beside the lake back to the campsite. Same great views but from a different level.
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So what do you do when you've finished your planned hikes and it's only 3:00 in the afternoon? Do another one, of course!

From the Berg lake campsite, it's only 4 km to Robson Glacier. We'd been looking at Mist and Berg Glaciers, both of which come down off the slopes of Mt Robson, but the real Robson Glacier was tucked in behind on the other side of the mountain.

First a walk across the alluvial plain at the head of the lake...


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image.jpg Nice views up the valley, but we followed a level trail along the Robson River.


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And a first glimpse of the glacier...

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Interesting sign posted by the Alpine Club of Canada back in 1911. It shows the location of the glacier's toe back then and lists the amount of recession at 15 metres per year.
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Then the lake...
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with much warmer ponds trapped between the gravel, and an occasional iceberg melting in mid-stream.

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And back down. Almost as much to see coming back as going up!

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Rearguard Mountain in front, Waffl in the centre and Mt Robson behind.
And across the lake.


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When we woke up the net morning, it was to steady rain (again!) and the battery in my camera was almost done. I grabbed these last two photos...

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image.jpg...then everything went dead.

And farewell to Berg Lake, for this year anyway.

4:11 p.m. on September 6, 2012 (EDT)
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great pics..it brings back so many memories for me.

Did you go up to Snowbird Pass?  We almost made it and a rain/sleet/snow storm stopped us

5:34 p.m. on September 6, 2012 (EDT)
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Only got as far as Robsopn glacier before it started getting dark. Not enough time to get up into the pass. See photos.

Mt. Robson has its own micro-climate. Because it's so high, it blocks the wet air coming in up the western slope of the Rockies and forces it upwards. It cools and the result is regular rainfall that you don't find at lower elevations or on the eastern slopes. That's why there are cedar groves at the start of the trail and not just pine and spruce.

6:22 p.m. on October 23, 2012 (EDT)
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peter1955 said:

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This photo selected by Outdoor Research for their FB page.

12:55 p.m. on October 24, 2012 (EDT)
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congrats on them picking your photo

11:02 a.m. on October 25, 2012 (EDT)
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I cant stop staring at Mt Robson. AMAZING!

 

3:25 p.m. on October 25, 2012 (EDT)
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It IS pretty cool. Three major glaciers on one mountain and an icefield on top. and more nearby.

You're a climber, FStS. If you're that fascinated with it, I could provide descriptions of the climbing routes (three good ones). If that doesn't motivate you to come here and do it, nothing will.

3:55 p.m. on October 25, 2012 (EDT)
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peter1955 said:

It IS pretty cool. Three major glaciers on one mountain and an icefield on top. and more nearby.

You're a climber, FStS. If you're that fascinated with it, I could provide descriptions of the climbing routes (three good ones). If that doesn't motivate you to come here and do it, nothing will.

 The pictures alone had me going to Google and started me thinking.

I'll have to put this on my list of places to go when I'm rich.

4:03 p.m. on October 25, 2012 (EDT)
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Outstanding as usual Peter!

What is the story with drinking water in that area? Is OR one of your sponsers?

9:30 a.m. on October 26, 2012 (EDT)
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Patman said:

Outstanding as usual Peter!

What is the story with drinking water in that area? Is OR one of your sponsers?

 Thanks, Patman.

Drinking water comes out of the lake or the streams that feed it. Too cold for much of anything to survive, but I treated it with my All-Clear anyway, and did a bag every night with tablets so we'd have lots for morning coffee. It might be possible to use a regular water filter but there's enough glacial flour to plug one off pretty quickly - bring a bandana!

I like OR's equipment so much (although I can't afford too much of it) that I asked them to let me post their logo on my website. See 'Disclosure' on my profile. I would like to think that didn't influence their selection of the photo, though. :-)

6:18 p.m. on October 26, 2012 (EDT)
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I already looked up the routes.  WAY beyond my abilities.  I can still dream though!

6:23 p.m. on October 26, 2012 (EDT)
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Well,  FStS, you (or the other regulars here) could still do the routes we did on our hikes. You'd still be in the mountains and have all those views to look at.

8:01 p.m. on October 29, 2012 (EDT)
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I'm jealous Peter...in a friendly way of course. That sure is some fine country!

Looks like plenty of water & loose rock in your photos.

Thanks a lot for the great photos and I'm glad you guys got to get out and hike in such beautiful country.

Are there any fish in that water? (kinda joking but if you know that would be cool)

Thanks,

Mike G.

9:33 a.m. on October 30, 2012 (EDT)
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I don't think any kind of fish could make it up Emperor Falls (at 500 metres high and a dozen waterfalls) to Berg Lake itself, but Dolly Varden, Lake Trout, Rainbow Trout, Bull Trout, Kokanee and Whitefish are found in various lakes and rivers in Mt Robson Park. Salmon fishing on the Fraser River is also an option.

9:46 a.m. on October 30, 2012 (EDT)
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Great photos and scenery. Looks like alot of glacial silt in the lake and stream photos. That would be an awesome place to visit.

December 21, 2014
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