Specs

Pack bag = 1100g
Lid = 140g
Hipbelt = 185g
Framesheet + Pad = 500g
Straps = 160g

Reviews

1

My experience with Cilo was about the same as the…

Rating: rated 1.5 of 5 stars
Source: bought it new
Price Paid: $375

Summary

My experience with Cilo was about the same as the OP who made a review under the Cuben fiber model. I found many complaints and reviews online regarding Cilo's lack of responses. A few years ago when I purchased my pack they were very responsive to purchase and then unresponsive to my calls, emails, or FB posts seeking their directive, and when they did respond they wanted to argue or prove that they responded.

Pros

  • Technically a high performance alpine pack for the climbs only 5% do

Cons

  • Uncomfortable
  • Useless side pockets for anything but wands or skis
  • No way to carry water bottles
  • Not waterproof, 1-2 cups water in bottom often
  • Floppy lid
  • Carries heavy
  • Lousy load hauler

My experience with Cilo was about the same as the OP who made a review under the Cuben fiber model. I found many complaints and reviews online regarding Cilo's lack of responses. A few years ago when I purchased my pack they were very responsive to purchase and then unresponsive to my calls, emails, or FB posts seeking their directive, and when they did respond they wanted to argue or prove that they responded. One would think a small company would have over the top customer service experience, but I simply have not found that to be the case.

I have a 75L Work Sack and have used it on several climbs in the US, Nepal, Denali, AD, Cho Oyu, Mansula, and Everest with weight in the 50-60 pounds. I always had the extension fully out and the lid does not fit or cover well when you do. IMHO what it comes down to is their packs are a really designed and best used as a "specialized alpine climbing pack" but then the 75 is too big for that as weight becomes an issue.

This design comes into itself when doing hard "pushing the limits" kind of Alpine fast and light climbing, not the type of mountaineering most people are doing. Not standard route slog approach hauling mountaineering, not backpacking, and not the type of climbs 85% of people do. Max weight 40 pounds. This pack is a climbing pack not a load hauling pack.

In the smaller versions the design makes for a great daypack or overnighter for the folks who want to bivy on a ledge with their legs in the pack. This pack is not a comfortable load carrier after about 30-40 pounds and with winter gear barely has enough room for a Rainier, West Butt, or any hill that you are load hauling.

Yes, they have a video showing a Denali guide showing all his gear stuffed inside. But really take a look at what is in the pack and know that he will use a sled. Note that there is no food, no stove or cooking, no climbing gear, no pro, no ropes, no group gear and no med. Just basic personal stuff. I don't remember there even being a tent.

My 75 barely fits my FF Peregrine in the bottom and that's with an eVent compression sack which I had to use because the pack fills with 1-2 cups of water in the bottom several times. I always seem to find water in the bottom. There are no creature comforts, pleasure or convenience factors if that is something you want. No frills, no extras, just a stripped down barely what you need, nothing you don't, get down to business pack. Great pack—good for one thing and one thing only. 

I have run into several folks in the field with Cilo packs who were complaining of them being horribly uncomfortable to the point of being painful and wanting to leave the pack behind. They take some time to figure out and to set up correctly.

I inquired to Cilo about their directive as to how to carry water and access the side pockets when the pack is full as well and why all of their other W/NWD version Work Sacks are priced about 30% higher for W/NWD in every pack size except for the 75L where it is more than double. Their arrogant reply was that all of their "other" pack prices should be raised.

We were going to order seven packs but I never ordered anything else from them and my advice for anyone would be to look elsewhere if you want a company that will provide responsive Customer Service. I tried contacting them several times for over two years.

For Rainier, W Butt, general mountaineering, and backpacking the best pack I have found by far is a McHale for everything and maybe Ill try a Hyperlite for under $400 for just an off-the-shelf summit bag. McHale packs are incredibly comfortable at carrying any weight up to and over #100 at about 40%. If you're carrying 70 it feels like 40.

Alicia TRAILSPACE STAFF

Thanks for sharing your experience with your Cilo pack, Allen. Do you have any pictures of your pack in use you could show others in your review?Welcome to Trailspace!


3 months ago

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