Superlative quality and features. Spacious. Stormproof.

Rating: rated 5 of 5 stars
Source: bought it new
Price Paid: $785 (US)


Superlative quality and features. Spacious. Stormproof. A truly excellent 3-4 season tent. If you like backpacking in inclement fall-winter-spring conditions, and especially on trips longer than a few nights, consider the Nammatj.


  • See below


  • See below

This tent replaced a 25-yr-old (worn-out), 2-person, lightweight, 4-season tent. [I purchased the Nammatj in early fall 2015.] Yes, it costs a lot of $, but I and tentmates have found it worth every dollar. I chose the 3-person model because it provides ample inner tent space and a capacious vestibule for 2 people compared to the Nammatj 2: 21.6% more inner tent sq ft, 33.3% more vestibule sq ft, 10.5% more wt—all for 6.8% more $.

Great headspace and width. Best ventilation functionality I've ever seen in a 4-season tent. The tent floor is the most durable I've ever owned and the Kerlon 1800 rainfly material is extremely tough. There is plenty of vestibule space for cooking and simultaneously storing gear during inclement weather. The sand color allows for wonderful ambient interior light and an unobtrusive visual presence when the tent is seen from a distance.

Suggestion: Keep the inner tent toggled to the rainfly for ease of set-up. Because of guylines and the large footprint, one must carefully choose a tentsite. I custom cut Tyvek ground cloths for the inner tent and vestibule and replaced the peg (i.e., stake) cord loops w/ reflective ones.

The guylines are nonreflective, so I attached small "tags" of reflective tape to them. They have minimal stretch during rainy conditions. At first glance one might think the Nammatj is difficult to pitch, but having backpacked > 20,000 miles and spent > 2 yrs of wilderness canoeing, trust me when I say this tent is relatively easy to pitch and take down.

I wish there were more/or larger inner pockets and the possibility of attaching an attic. However, the 36.6 sq ft inner and 17.2 sq ft vestibule areas provide plenty of space for storing gear. Whatever you hang on the interior end-to-end clothesline, keep them light in weight. Unless the weather is particularly windy, storming rain, or snowing, I use 8 pegs (Hilleberg provides 18); I stake  the 2 guylines nearest the door, rear fly corners, front of vestibule and guyline at each end). 

In my opinion the minimum is 6 pegs, though some people will find even that to be too many...alas. I pitched the tent at home on a very windy day (36+ mph) and pegging all guylines and all pullouts, including those at each pole end, made for a very taut tent. I like a full coverage rainfly design for tents that will be used under adverse conditions.

I STRONGLY encourage the prospective buyer examine Hilleberg's website and read as much as possible, including "information on tents" and "practical hints" links. Find the tent model that best meets your needs.

I chose the Nammatj over the Nallo because of its larger living and storage spaces, and stronger materials. I have no regrets spending $785 for this tent and am looking forward to a trip this winter on deep snowpack and a raging snowstorm.




Thanks for the info and pics, hiker1982. I hope you'll let us know how the Nammatj works out for you this winter.

10 months ago

I may owe my life to this tent. My wife and I were…

Rating: rated 5 of 5 stars
Design: 4 season tunnel
Sleeps: 3
Ease of Setup: very easy for one person to set up in a gale
Weight: 3.0 kg = 6 lbs. 9 oz.
Price Paid: 5500 SEK = $630

I may owe my life to this tent. My wife and I were able to set it up in 30 m/s (=65 mph) wind in a snowstorm in the Swedish Arctic this fall. I now understand why this model has been used on Swedish Polar expeditions.

Very comfortable, great venitillation, quiet in wind, low weight. I really don't understand why anybody would want to buy a heavy, complicated dome type tent when you can get a great HAND MADE model like this.

Go to for a floorplan and description of how you set up their tents.