Mountain Hardwear SkyLedge 2

6 reviews
5-star:   2
4-star:   1
3-star:   1
2-star:   2
1-star:   0

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Reviews

1

Great tent...if you're under 5'9"...and have a short…

Rating: rated 4 of 5 stars
Design: 3 seaon
Sleeps: 2
Ease of Setup: easy
Weight: @ 4.2 lbs
Price Paid: Retail

Great tent...if you're under 5'9"...and have a short bag. Otherwise your bag, and maybe you, will hit the tent walls (read condensation).

FYI, I checked with MH direct and they advised that this tent is not designed for persons 6 feet and over.

0

This tent is, on paper, just what I am looking for.

Rating: rated 2 of 5 stars

This tent is, on paper, just what I am looking for. Sturdy, light weight.

After reading all the positive comments I went out to buy this tent, but was disappointed at the dealer when I had a closer look.

The short pole that crosses the top of the tent is held in place by to connection straps to the tent.
But the fly just lies over it without any fixing to this short pole. This meant the the pole was in the correct place keeping up the fly on one end, but at the other, it was sticking out at the zipper. I couldn't get it fixed properly.

How to deal with this, and keep the short pole and the fly in the proper configuration??

0

I traded in my HubbaHubba for the SkyLedge 2 back…

Rating: rated 5 of 5 stars
Design: three-season freestanding dome
Sleeps: 1
Ease of Setup: very easy
Weight: 5 pounds packed
Price Paid: $199

I traded in my HubbaHubba for the SkyLedge 2 back in the Fall of 2005. I was unhappy with the single door in the HubbaHubba (it now has two doors) and water seeped through floor during a heavy rains.

I have been very happy with the SkyLedge 2. It is very lightweight and durable. It has withstood many heavy rains without ever leaking. During high winds it is very stable. The tent also breathes well and I have never had any problems with condensation.

My only complaint is the size. It fits me at 5'10" but would not fit anyone taller (I just barely fit). Also, it is not a two-person tent. I can fit in it with my seven-year-old son but not with anyone else other than my wife. Since my wife doesn't like to backpack, I am fine using it as a solo tent or with my children but wouldn't recommend it to anyone who has personal space issues. So for my purpose (lightweight, durability, and breathability) it has been the best tent I have ever owned.

0

I bought this tent expecting first rate quality which…

Rating: rated 2 of 5 stars
Price Paid: $295

I bought this tent expecting first rate quality which Mountain Hardwear is known for and was completely disappointed! Mountain Hardwear's warranty department acknowledged some tents shipped were defective - several of the powerclip straps ripped; some completely from the tent body making it impossible to attach the poles to the tent. Mountain Hardwear offered to replace the tent, but I returned it to REI where I purchased it due to the fact the tent is way too small as other reviewers have commented. If you can't fit two standard size Therm-a-rests side by side it's too small!

I bought the MSR Hubba Hubba - lightweight, perfect size 84x50 (fits 2 pads side by side), not as bomber as the Skyledge (due to pole configuration) but a great tent / Backpacker Mag Editors Choice.

I think Mountain Hardwear's dedication and reputation for quality products has slipped since being acquired by Columbia Sportswear!

0

I know Mountain Hardwear makes great products. Any…

Rating: rated 3 of 5 stars
Design: Three Season Freestanding Dome
Sleeps: 2
Ease of Setup: Simple up and down. clip, clip clip.
Weight: around 5 pounds
Price Paid: $219 REI Sale

I know Mountain Hardwear makes great products. Any time I can find a sale on them I buy all I can. However, the Skyledge 2 is a little too small for me. Shopping for a two-person lightweight tent I had an MSR Hubba Hubba on order from REI and happend to be in the store when I saw the Skyledge on sale and set up. Looking it over I liked the ridgepole design to extend the fly and keep drips out of the tent. The price was $80 less than the Hubba Hubba so I decided to go with the Skyledge.

Setting the tent up at home to test I got a quick surprise. Easy setup, and a quality sturdy build but this thing looked narrow. I was trying to imagine two standard Therm-a-Rest pads fitting in there and there was just no way. Once I was in the tent I also found that the length wasn't there either. I'm 6 foot and my head and toes were pressed up against each end. The specs say 88 inches, but it couldn't be any more than 74 inches. If you're a smaller build and/or would use this as a very roomy solo shelter it could still work well. This one is going back and I'll hope for a bigger lighter Hubba Hubba.

Bottom Line: Great Company. Quality built tent. Tent is a little shorter and more narrow than the specs indicate.

0

Perfect backpacker's tent...rain or shine. Picked…

Rating: rated 5 of 5 stars
Design: three-season freestanding dome (with fly)
Sleeps: 2
Ease of Setup: Easy to Very Easy
Weight: 4.5 lbs. max, 4.8 lbs. with added footprint
Price Paid: $189

Perfect backpacker's tent...rain or shine. Picked mine up, brand new, from a special promotion at OutdoorOutlet.com for ~33% off the 2006 model retail price...loved that!

I used it two weeks ago on a canoeing/camping outing and it rained during the final half hour of canoeing. We reached camp, dry docked the canoes, and began setting up camp in a slight drizzle. I barely got the first stake into the corner loop and the skies opened up, I rolled it up and sheltered under a tree until the rain stopped.

The tent doesn't come with a footprint (~$30) so get one. Lay it out, unroll the tent, and immediately stake out the body. Two scandium doped aluminum poles (weigh virtually nothing) go diagonally across the trapezoidal bottom (which is closer to a rectangle so be sure to match it up with the footprint using the seam sewn indicator tabs). Where they cross in the middle one big hook raises the center of the no-see-um mesh walls. Then external clips go down to the corners. Pop the third (and last) short pole across the roof at the mid point to bow out the walls (this produces real space inside the tent).

Throw the fly over it if bad weather is on the way, again matching up the indicator tabs. Pop the four straps under the pole ends at the corners of the tent floor, between the floor seam and stake loops. Stake out the vestibule loops (or guys) and you're done.

It takes about 5 minutes if you're taking your time, for example, handling your poles, aligning the tabs, etc. For extra stability, the book describes a method for stringing an internal guy system plus the fly has already attached four additional guy-out lines with matching hooks underneath that attach to the poles.

It is plenty roomy for the single user; however, in a pinch, or very loving situation, it can accommodate two adults, certainly one Boy Scout and his dad! Great tent!

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