Mountain Hardwear Trango 4

1 review
5-star:   0
4-star:   1
3-star:   0
2-star:   0
1-star:   0

Specs

Capacity 4
Minimum Weight 12 lb / 5.44 kg
Packed Weight 12 lb 16 oz / 5.88 kg
Floor Area 65 sq ft / 6.0 sq m
Number of Doors 2
Number of Poles 5
Number of Vestibules 2
Vestibule Area 18 sq ft 1.7 sq m / 6 sq ft 0.6 sq m
Interior Height 50 in / 127 cm
Packed Diameter 10 in / 25 cm
Packed Length 23 in / 60 cm
Pitch Light Weight 9 lb 5 oz / 4.23 kg

Reviews

0

We splurged on our Trango 4 before moving to Norway…

Rating: rated 4 of 5 stars
Price Paid: About $600

We splurged on our Trango 4 before moving to Norway almost 9 years ago, anticipating a lot of camping in high winds above the trees. As it turns out, we use the huts a lot and haven't often put it to the test, but we have survived a number of windy and rainy nights in relative comfort. The Trango 2 has been reviewed several times over, and a lot of what has been said about that tent would also apply here.

We found it roomy enough for the four of us when the kids were small, but it would be tight for four adults. For just my wife and I it is a palace, but too heavy and bulky for practical backcountry use for two, even with a pulk. So that makes it about 4 lbs a head for 3 people -- keeping in mind that it is a bomb shelter of a tent.

Lots of attention to detail: Windows over the vestibule and interior, locking clips on the main attachment points, the fly clips in to the frame for anchoring in high winds, lots of pockets inside for stowing gear, fast clips to anchor the fly at the main corners. The four poles are all the same length so there's no ditzing around trying to get the right pole (think Oval Intention). We never really used the gear loft much but we have one.

My main complaint: inadequate ventilation. Because the fly comes within inches of the ground on all sides, it traps a bubble of warm, moist body air that then condenses on the fly, waterproof parts of the walls, and the floor. Most Scandinavian tents have one or two roof vents to let out moisture -- I don't get why so many American designed tents omit this feature. Five stars if they would do something about that.

Where to Buy

Manufacturer's Description

Visit Mountain Hardwear's Trango 4 page.

Retailers' Descriptions

Here's what other sites are saying:

The Mountain Hardwear Trango 4 Tent is designed for winter mountaineering. It's built strong and engineered to shelter 4 climbers in tough alpine conditions.

- REI

Mountain Hardwear Trango 4 Expedition Tent The Mountain Hardwear Trango 4 Expedition Tent is a superlight shelter. The watertight construction is rain room tested. The large dry entry vestibules provide ample access. The color-coded webbing has a series of stitches, which help to set up poles with ease. The optional floor footprint protects the tent from ground friction. The mesh and canopy thru-vent provides a cooling effect to the tent. Outdoor adventures will be great with the Mountain Hardwear Trango 4 Expedition Tent.

- SunnySports

Unless you're Reinhold Messner, the Mountain Hardwear Trango 4 Four-Person Four-Season Tent is tougher than you. It's definitely been to more places than you, and spent more nights outside in the most rugged weather on the planet. To rub it in even more, you should know it was only born in 1995. That's getting old for a tent, but luckily Mountain Hardwear makes 'em new every year, and they just keep getting better. The new features on this iteration include an updated bathtub-style floor, burly DirectConnect guy-out points and pole clips, mesh doors with a zip-away nylon cover, and snow flaps along the bottom of the vestibule to keep drafts and spindrift from creeping into your shelter. If that all sounds pretty sweet, it's because it is, but that's just a sampling of the delicious buffet of rugged features found on the Trango. You'd expect an alpine basecamp-style tent to be able to stand up to high winds and heavy snow, and the Trango doesn't disappoint. It uses four DAC Featherlite NSL aluminum poles to pitch up as solidly as you could ever want, and even has a fifth pole that supports the vestibule, giving you tons of weatherproof space for gear-storing and booting up. The poles, tent body, and fly clip together at every guy-out point to create a bombproof shelter that won't get rattled to bits during an all-time storm, and all the seams are fully taped to lock out moisture--in fact, the Trango's been through a rain room test in which it was subjected to 1200in of rain in 24 hours, just to make sure it would stay dry. Good luck finding a storm that bad. There are plenty of options to make the Trango cozy when you're trapped inside waiting out the storm, too, like several small windows in the fly, mesh storage pockets, and a separately-sold gear loft. You can even take the fly out on the trail with just the footprint (sold here) for a shelter that weighs in at just 8. 5lbs. Just make sure you save a spot for Reinhold--he doesn't like sleeping outside.

- Backcountry.com

Free Shipping. Mountain Hardwear Trango 4 Tent FEATURES of the Mountain Hardwear Trango 4 Tent Industry leading DAC Feather light NSL poles Direct Connect point secures tent body, frame and fly at each guy out point for a solid connection between all three components Large dry entry vestibules with brow pole provide ample headroom and room for gear storage 2 dual canopy and mesh doors Snow flaps on front vestibule seal out spindrift Guaranteed watertight construction with fully taped fly, taped 'bathtub floor construction, welded corners and welded guy clip anchors Rain room tested SPECIFICATIONS of the Mountain Hardwear Trango 4 Tent Capacity: 4 Pitch Type: Freestanding Minimum Weight: 11 lbs 7 oz / 5188 g Pitchlight Weight: 8 lbs 8 oz / 3.72 kg Floor Area: 57 square feet / 5.3 square meter Canopy: 40D Nylon 238T Ripstop FR DWR Fly: 70D Nylon Taffeta 1500 mm PU/SIL Floor: 70D Nylon 190T Taffeta 10000 mm Ether Type PU FR Pole: DAC Featherlight NSL

- Moosejaw