Outdoor Research DryComp Summit Sack

2 reviews
5-star:   0
4-star:   1
3-star:   1
2-star:   0
1-star:   0

Reviews

1

This is a great ultralight bag that can serve many…

Rating: rated 4 of 5 stars
Source: bought it new
Price Paid: $75 CAD

Summary

This is a great ultralight bag that can serve many functions thereby reducing the total weight of your load during longer hauls. However it's also a great pack on its own for ultralight weekenders. Due to the thin material I would not recommend it for bushwhacking nor for heavy loads, but it's great for hiking to your camping spot while carrying 15-20lbs.

Pros

  • Lightweight
  • Versatile
  • Waterproof

Cons

  • Relatively expensive
  • Relatively bulky when empty
  • Smaller capacity than previous version at that price

I have the previous version of this bag and I'm glad to see that they responded to user's comments, i.e. improved durability on bottom, added sternum strap, and removal of front compression straps (opting for side ones instead). 

But I'm sorry to see it drop 10L: at 36L, it was perfect to carry-on size for a one month trip to Europe.

Still, this is a great multifunctional ultralight bag:

I've used it several times as carry-on luggage for my clothing + lighter gear, with the heavier stuff going into my tougher MEC Pika daypack (which counts as "purse" for carry-on).

It has also held up during 40K daily cycling commutes to school - rain or shine - for an entire summer. Just wipe down the "skunk strip" from biking in rain, and it looks as good as new. Perfect size for a change of clothes + big lunch + agenda + notebook + toiletries bag + heavy-duty bike chain.

It's great for camping/hiking, either to compress all the clothing in your main pack on long hauls, or as your main pack for ultralight weekends. The side mesh pockets are big enough to hold my 1L Nalgene on one side and either my tent poles or BigAgnes sleeping mattress on the other. And it's small enough to use as a pillow when filled with clothing :)

Oh and it's also a workhorse for hauling groceries in the rain! 

That being said, for heavy loads (20-30lbs), stick to short distances (i.e. 5-10K) because there's not much to the shoulder straps and hip belt. And the fabric isn't bomb-proof. Though I haven't had any rips, tears, or seams falling apart yet...

Some reviewers from the previous version have said the straps were uncomfortable, but I found it to be surprisingly comfortable for what it is (i.e. a drybag). And I'm 5'6" with medium athletic build — so maybe it's not great if you have a larger/taller torso (?)

Four stars because it's relatively expensive for what it is — especially since they dropped it down from 36L to 27L — and because it takes up a lot of space when empty (~2L), thus reducing its "stashability" .

The ultralight multifunctional aspect of OR's drybag/daypacks is unbeatable. I'm most likely buying the Dry Peak Bagger to add to my arsenal, since it folds down to nothingness. 

0

I got this as a lightweight addition to my pack collection.

Rating: rated 3.5 of 5 stars
Price Paid: $70

I got this as a lightweight addition to my pack collection. On a recent excursion, it performed in an unspectacular way. I'm still unsure exactly who this pack is marketed towards. OR explains it as a convertible stuff sack to summit pack, but who wants a 12 oz stuff sack.

I weighted the pack down with about 16 or so pounds - food, water, and all - and I felt this was a little much for the pack. I was using a z-rest to add support on the back, which helped a lot, but the shoulder straps are too lightly padded.

Also, my biggest complaint is the lack of a real waistbelt. The straps OR says can convert to a waistbelt lack the necessary anchors to do so.

With everything on the table, this pack makes too many sacrifices to be a wonder pack. It could also be that my Granite Gear pack has spoiled me though.

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