Tents and Shelters

Ready for a night out? Whether you’re an ultralight alpinist, family of backpackers, devoted hanger, or comfort camper, you'll find the best tents, tarps, and hammocks for your outdoor overnights right here.

Check out our top picks below—including price comparisons—to shelter you in any terrain, trip, or season: winter mountaineering, three-season thru-hiking, warm weather car camping, hammock hanging, alpine bivys, tarps, and emergency shelter.

Or you can browse our thousands of independent tent and shelter ratings and reviews by product type, brand, or price. Written by real-world hikers, backpackers, alpinists, climbers, and paddlers, Trailspace community reviews will help you select a dependable, field-tested, outdoor abode just right for your next adventure.

Learn more about how to choose a tent/shelter below »

Categories

Four-Season
3-4 Season Convertible
Three-Season
Warm Weather
Bivy Sacks
Tarps and Shelters
Hammocks
Bug Nets
Accessories

Brands

Eagles Nest Outfitters
NEMO
Hilleberg
MSR
Marmot
Grand Trunk
Black Diamond
ALPS Mountaineering
REI
Eureka!

Genders

Unisex
Men's
Kids'

Price

less than $25
$25 - $49.99
$50 - $99.99
$100 - $199.99
$200 - $299.99
$300 - $399.99
$400 - $499.99
$500 and above

Recent Tent/Shelter Reviews

Eureka! Tetragon 9

rated 4.5 of 5 stars Choosing one tent is hard. Thinking about all your options and all the various ways that you will use your tent and in all the different places, you probably want more than one tent! Sure, you want that solo tent for trips "just by yourself" and then there's that family tent for trips where you take the kids or grandkids or friends. And yet, investing in many tents can be quite expensive. Here's the one tent that you need! This beautiful tent, windows and all, is the perfect tent if you want to… Full review

Big Agnes Scout UL2

rated 5 of 5 stars Good size tent, enough room for a backpack in wet weather. Roomy and tall enough to dress comfortably. Also, weather worthy. I recommend this tent — so happy that I get to sleep in it. Full review

Sierra Designs Mondo 5 CD

rated 4 of 5 stars This is a great tent! Sleeps 4 people very comfortably. We've had the tent for 24 years now and it's still in perfect condition. Super durable and reliable. It is easy to set up and take down. It has prevailed through many wind and rain storms with us sleeping (still dry) inside!  Full review

Sierra Designs Light Year 1

rated 5 of 5 stars I have used this tent for many outings, including hiking 200 miles on the Colorado Trail. This tent has kept me dry in many storms, especially those on the CT. As a lightweight tent, I feel it has worn well, and has more life in it now that I have applied some seam seal, where it was peeling off. Easy setup; room for solo hiker; good vestibule for boots; is taut enough to keep me dry in all conditions, including severe weather in Colorado mountains; no condensation issues. I'm 6-2 and can sit up… Full review

MSR Hubba Hubba NX 2P

rated 5 of 5 stars This tent is easy to set up, comfortable for two, and lightweight. I have set this tent up with another person in varying conditions and configurations. We purchased the footprint separately, and the setup is just as easy. The stakes are small, the tents are permanently connected. This is a snap. The tent is taut when pitched and remains stable. It is comfortable -- good ventilation, but keeps occupants warm when needed. There is enough room to sit upright and change clothes in the tent. There are… Full review

Big Agnes Fly Creek UL2

rated 4.5 of 5 stars This tent is extremely lightweight, but still strong. I have not ever had problems with condensation. I take a two-week backpacking trip into the Wind River Range every summer and have never had any problems with this tent. It did not collapse when under 18 inches of snow, bend or rip during very strong winds, rip or puncture when campsite was rocky, or have problems with condensation. It would be small for two tall hikersm but I use it as a one-man tent and store my pack inside. I have not used… Full review

Sierra Designs Lightning 2 FL

rated 4.5 of 5 stars This tent is super easy to pitch. The fly and tent body are integrated, so there is no need for extra stakes. Natural color of tent offers more private camping appeal. The Sierra Designs Lightning FL 2p tent is a great camping home. The tent compresses nicely and is simple to pitch with one connected set of DAC poles. The setup only requires 6 stakes. The tent ceiling is high enough to sit up and to change. Also, this is an excellent tent for stealth camping.  Full review

The North Face Northwind

rated 1 of 5 stars Outstanding design, simple to erect. However if it rains you might as well go and sleep outside!!! The tent was returned to North Face and nothing was done. It was returned to me as it left—pretty disgusting from a company like North Face. How can North Face get it so wrong? All they need to do to make the tent a five star+ tent is to make it waterproof, end of story. Full review

Mountain Hardwear Mountain Jet 2

rated 0.5 of 5 stars Most seams are glued, zero stitching in the areas like the entire tub of the tent. The tent has absolutely fallen apart at the seams. Poor construction, terrible POS. I will never purchase another item from Mountain Hardwear! Full review

Top-Rated Tents and Shelters

Sort by: name | rating | price | availability | recently reviewed

user rating: 5 of 5 (108)
Eagles Nest Outfitters DoubleNest Hammock
$70 - $99
user rating: 5 of 5 (15)
Eagles Nest Outfitters Atlas Straps Hammock Accessory
$30 - $39
user rating: 5 of 5 (11)
NEMO Morpho AR Three-Season Tent
$312
user rating: 5 of 5 (9)
Hilleberg Nallo 2 Four-Season Tent
$735
user rating: 5 of 5 (7)
MSR E-Wing Tarp/Shelter
$75 - $148
user rating: 5 of 5 (6)
Eagles Nest Outfitters ProFly Rain Tarp Tarp/Shelter
$80 - $119
user rating: 5 of 5 (6)
Hilleberg Soulo Four-Season Tent
$685
user rating: 5 of 5 (5)
Hilleberg Nammatj 3 GT Four-Season Tent
$979
user rating: 5 of 5 (5)
Marmot Limelight 4P Three-Season Tent
$369
user rating: 5 of 5 (4)
Grand Trunk Double Parachute Nylon Hammock Hammock
$50 - $74
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Black Diamond Mega Light Tarp/Shelter
$217
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Hilleberg Kaitum 2 Four-Season Tent
$885 - $1,020
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Hilleberg Nallo 3 GT Four-Season Tent
$885
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
ALPS Mountaineering Lynx 2 AL Three-Season Tent
$140
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (37)
REI Half Dome 2 Three-Season Tent
$199
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (32)
Eagles Nest Outfitters SingleNest Hammock
$60
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (30)
Eureka! Apex 2XT Three-Season Tent
$112 - $139
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (28)
Eureka! Spitfire 1 Three-Season Tent
$140
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (28)
Mountain Hardwear Trango 2 Four-Season Tent
$650
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (24)
Marmot Limelight 2P Three-Season Tent
$170 - $249
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (22)
Eureka! Alpenlite XT Four-Season Tent
$370
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (22)
The North Face Mountain 25 Four-Season Tent
$440 - $589
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (21)
Eureka! K2 XT Four-Season Tent
$400 - $499
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (20)
Eureka! Timberline 2 Three-Season Tent
$144 - $179
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (20)
Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2 Three-Season Tent
$350
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (18)
Marmot Limelight 3P Three-Season Tent
$248 - $299
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (18)
Kelty Noah's Tarp 12 Tarp/Shelter
$45 - $69
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (18)
Kelty Grand Mesa 2 Three-Season Tent
$91 - $139
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (18)
Big Agnes Fly Creek UL2 Three-Season Tent
$350
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (17)
Eureka! Timberline 4 Three-Season Tent
$184 - $229
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (15)
Hilleberg Akto Four-Season Tent
$530
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (15)
REI Half Dome 2 Plus Three-Season Tent
$219
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (14)
Hennessy Hammock Ultralight Backpacker Asym Hammock
$250
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (13)
ALPS Mountaineering Zephyr 2.0 Three-Season Tent
$140
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (12)
MSR Groundhog Tent Stake Stake
$3 - $19
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (12)
Eagles Nest Outfitters Guardian Bug Net Hammock
$45 - $59
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (12)
Big Agnes Copper Spur UL3 Three-Season Tent
$500
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (10)
Eureka! Timberline SQ Outfitter 6 Three-Season Tent
$440
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (10)
Eureka! Assault Outfitter 4 Four-Season Tent
$384
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (9)
Kelty Noah's Tarp 9 Tarp/Shelter
$60
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (8)
Big Agnes Big House 4 Three-Season Tent
$330
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (8)
Big Agnes Copper Spur UL1 Three-Season Tent
$380
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
MSR Elixir 3 Three-Season Tent
$225 - $299
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Kelty Noah's Tarp 16 Tarp/Shelter
$75 - $99
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
The North Face 2-Meter Dome Four-Season Tent
$5,500
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
REI Passage 2 Tent Three-Season Tent
$159
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Grand Trunk Funky Forest Tarp Tarp/Shelter
$80
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Eagles Nest Outfitters Housefly Rain Tarp Tarp/Shelter
$140
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Kammok Roo Hammock
$99
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Byer Easy Traveller Hammock
$47 - $49
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What’s the “best” tent or shelter for you? Consider your personal outdoor needs, preferences, and budget:

  • Conditions:
    First, and most important, in what seasons, conditions, and terrain will you use your tent, tarp, or hammock? Choose a shelter that can handle the conditions you expect to encounter (rain, snow, wind, heat, humidity, biting insects, an energetic scout troop), but don’t buy more tent than you truly need, and don’t expect one tent to do it all.
  • Capacity:
    Tents are typically classified by sleeping capacity (i.e. one-person, two-person, etc). However, a tent's stated sleeping capacity usually does not include much (or any) space for your gear and there’s no sizing standard between tent manufacturers. Some users size up.
  • Livability:
    Will you use the tent as a basecamp or is it an emergency shelter only? To determine if you and your gear will fit, look at the shelter’s dimensions, including floor and vestibule square areas, height and headroom (including at the sides), plus the number and placement of doors, gear lofts, and pockets, to assess personal livability, comfort, and footprint.
  • Weight and Packed Size:
    If you’ll be backpacking, climbing, cycling, or otherwise carrying that shelter, consider its weight, packed size (and your pack it needs to fit in), and its space-to-weight ratio before automatically opting for the bigger tent. Paddlers and car campers have more room to work with, but everyone should consider how the tent and its parts pack up for stowage.
  • Design:
    Tents come in various designs. Freestanding tents can stand alone without stakes or guy lines and can be easily moved or have dirt and other debris shaken out without being disassembled, though they still need to be staked out. Rounded, geodesic domes are stable and able to withstand heavy snow loads and wind. Tunnel tents are narrow and rectangular, and large family cabin tents are best for warm-weather campground outings.
  • Other features and specs to consider include single versus double-wall, ease of setup, stability, weather resistance, ventilation, , and any noteworthy features.
  • Read more in our guide to tents.