Tents and Shelters

Ready for a night out? Whether you’re an ultralight alpinist, family of backpackers, devoted hanger, or comfort camper, you'll find the best tents, tarps, and hammocks for your outdoor overnights right here.

Check out our top picks below—including price comparisons—to shelter you in any terrain, trip, or season: winter mountaineering, three-season thru-hiking, warm weather car camping, hammock hanging, alpine bivys, tarps, and emergency shelter.

Or you can browse our thousands of independent tent and shelter ratings and reviews by product type, brand, or price. Written by real-world hikers, backpackers, alpinists, climbers, and paddlers, Trailspace community reviews will help you select a dependable, field-tested, outdoor abode just right for your next adventure.

Learn more about how to choose a tent/shelter below »

Categories

Four-Season
3-4 Season Convertible
Three-Season
Warm Weather
Bivy Sacks
Tarps and Shelters
Hammocks
Bug Nets
Accessories

Brands

Coghlan's
REI
Sierra Designs
Vargo
Nite Ize
MSR
Hilleberg
Gossamer Gear
Lawson Equipment
Sea to Summit

Genders

Unisex
Men's
Kids'

Price

less than $25
$25 - $49.99
$50 - $99.99
$100 - $199.99
$200 - $299.99
$300 - $399.99
$400 - $499.99
$500 and above

Recent Tent/Shelter Reviews

Coleman Sundome 2

rated 4 of 5 stars Great bang for the buck. I paid around $40 for this tent. I use it on my motorcycle. It packs small but the 5'x7' floor space is great for me and my gear. This tent can be set up in less than 10 minutes. I've been out in some windy areas and the held up fine. In wet weather as long as you don't get against the sides you're fine.  If it had a larger rain fly this would not be an issue. The Sundome 2 has large vents at the top and a half door vent, never had problem condensation. With the 5'x7' floor… Full review

NEMO Veda 2P

rated 2.5 of 5 stars Liked the light weight, and the fact that it had a floor in a trekking pole tent. Found out on night one that the tent was not waterproof, and the tent did not breathe well. I took the Nemo Veda 2p on a 10-day sheep hunt with a partner. We found out night 1 that the seams leaked and even some of the fabric was leaking through. Luckily this would be the only night that we would see rain. Not the only night we woke up wet, the tent's single wall gathered enough condensation to wet out our bags. The… Full review

Sierra Designs Sirius 2

rated 5 of 5 stars Three-season tent with plenty of room for two people, or one and all gear. Great for backpackers, car campers, or canoe campers. Best for those looking for a good product at a reasonable price. This is the easiest tent I've ever pitched. The poles all snap together easily, and are all connected in advance so there is no guesswork. The tent snaps easily to the poles, and the fly buckles on. The tent can easily be pitched in under two minutes. The tent has been stable and comfortable both in good… Full review

Integral Designs Unishelter

rated 4 of 5 stars I prefer a tent to a bivy but this is the best bivy I've ever used! Easy to climb into. Comfortable to read in. Light and packs small. Setup is as simple as it gets with any bivy. The one pole on this guy requires staking for it to be effective but once it's set up, the mesh stays off your face and there is plenty of room for reading comfortably. In warm, heavily mosquito'd areas you can leave the mesh open all night without walking up looking like you have small pox.  Completely waterproof —… Full review

Kelty TN2

rated 4 of 5 stars Probably one of the best tents I have ever owned. Easy to set up alone, dry in the wet, no condensation problems at night, and not too heavy. The design is well thought out and there are many great features. My only gripe is that it is not built for anyone taller than 6', as your head/feet will likely touch the front and back of the tent. Full review

Eureka! Mountain Pass 1XT

rated 4 of 5 stars Great small one-person tent. Very packable with short pole sections and it's a tough design! I have had this tent about three years now and it has become my go-to one-man tent. I have hiked many miles with it, been in some really bad storms, and it's always asked for more. I was into the Eureka TCOP military combat tents because they are VERY tough and can handle a snow load. I found this online and bought it because it looked similar but was less weight. It has been one of the best finds I have… Full review

ALPS Mountaineering Sundance 6

rated 4.5 of 5 stars The ALPS Mountaineering Sundance 6 is a very solid choice for a family sized car camping tent. I am very pleased with mine. I purchased the ALPS Mountaineering Sundance 6 after an extensive search for a family size tent to replace my much loved Cabelas Alaskan Guide 8-person dome tent. I did quite a bit of research on both cabin tents and dome tents. Having never owned a cabin style tent I was reluctant to go with this design. I am pleased that I did! The Sundance 6 is a 3-season 6-person cabin… Full review

MSR Elixir 2

rated 4.5 of 5 stars Two-person tent tested out on the GR20 (Corsica). Resistant, light, and easy to stock! 2.6 kg with the removable ground sheet. Not that heavy if separated into two backpacks, but I would be happy to see it coming down to 2kg. The Hubba NX  is lighter but too fragile, this why I see the Elixir losing just a bit of an edge, but keeping waterproofness and resistance against wind-shocks, rain and snow. By the way, about wind-shocks. I added extra cord loops to each part where you can use tent pegs. Full review

Big Agnes Fly Creek UL2

rated 4 of 5 stars Awesome tent, great to backpack with. Very compact, quick to set up, and has kept me dry in torrential rains and 30+ mph winds. Minus a star only because it will not stand on its own, and one of the zippers quickly broke on me. Setup:  Very fast setup, 5-10 minutes depending on surface. Really recommend getting the footprint not only for protection, but also allows you to just use the canopy if you so choose. Also makes setting up an easier process. Wasn't a fan of the original stakes, replaced… Full review

Top-Rated Tents and Shelters

Sort by: name | rating | price | availability | recently reviewed

Coghlan's ABS Tent Pegs Stake
$1
Coghlan's Aluminum Tent Pegs Stake
$1 - $2
REI Aluminum Hook Tent Stake Stake
$2
Sierra Designs Hex Peg Stake
$2 - $159
Coghlan's Nail Pegs Stake
$2
 
Vargo Aluminum Summit Tent Stake Stake
$16
Coghlan's Guy Line Adapters Tent Accessory
$2
Nite Ize Figure 9 Rope Tightener Tent Accessory
$2 - $6
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
MSR Needle Stake Kit Stake
$2 - $14
Hilleberg Tent Pole Holder Tent Accessory
$2
user rating: 4 of 5 (2)
Nite Ize CamJam Cord Tightener Tent Accessory
$2 - $6
Coghlan's Mini Stretch Cord Tent Accessory
$2
Coghlan's Mosquito Head Net Bug Net
$2
Gossamer Gear Tite-Lite Titanium Tent Stakes Stake
$3
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Lawson Equipment Titanium Tent Stake Stake
$3 MSRP
Vargo Titanium Tent Stake Stake
$3
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Nite Ize Figure 9 Carabiner Tent Accessory
$3 - $10
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
MSR Mini Groundhog Stake Stake
$3 - $16
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (12)
MSR Groundhog Tent Stake Stake
$3 - $19
Sea to Summit Ground Control Tent Peg Stake
$3 - $26
Coghlan's Steel Tent Stakes Stake
$3
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Coghlan's Tarp Clips Tent Accessory
$3
Coghlan's Skewer Pegs Stake
$3
Ultimate Survival Technologies Emergency Survival Bag Bivy Sack
$3
REI Snow Stake Stake
$3
Eagles Nest Outfitters Hammock Repair Kit Hammock Accessory
$3
Coghlan's Stretch Cord Tent Accessory
$3
Coghlan's Polypropylene Tent Pegs Stake
$3
Coghlan's Tent Whisk & Dust Pan Tent Accessory
$3 - $4
Coghlan's Ultralight Tent Stakes Stake
$3
Coghlan's Infants Mosquito Net Bug Net
$3
Coghlan's No-See-Um Head Net Bug Net
$4
Snow Peak Solid Stake Stake
$4 - $6
 
Liberty Bottleworks Bug Head Net Bug Net
$4
user rating: 2 of 5 (2)
Vargo Titanium Ascent Tent Stake Stake
$24
Vargo Titanium Crevice Stake Stake
$24
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
Vargo Titanium Nail Peg Stake
$27
Liberty Mountain Paracord Tent Accessory
$4 - $87
 
Eagles Nest Outfitters Aluminum Wiregate Carabiner Hammock Accessory
$4
Reliance Power Peg Stake
$4 - $7
 
Brooks-Range Tensioner Cord Set Tent Accessory
$4
 
UCO StakeLights Stake
$4
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Coghlan's Deluxe Mosquito Head Net Bug Net
$5
 
Eagles Nest Outfitters Ridgeline 2 with Prusik Knots Hammock Accessory
$5
Eagles Nest Outfitters DripStrips Hammock Accessory
$5
Nite Ize KnotBone Adjustable Bungee Tent Accessory
$5 - $9
MSR Blizzard Stake Stake
$5 - $24
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Nite Ize Gear Tie Tent Accessory
$5 - $25
NRS River Wing Spare Plastic Stakes Stake
$5
 
Outbound All Purpose Tarp Tarp/Shelter
$5
Page 1 of 72:  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  Next » 

What’s the “best” tent or shelter for you? Consider your personal outdoor needs, preferences, and budget:

  • Conditions:
    First, and most important, in what seasons, conditions, and terrain will you use your tent, tarp, or hammock? Choose a shelter that can handle the conditions you expect to encounter (rain, snow, wind, heat, humidity, biting insects, an energetic scout troop), but don’t buy more tent than you truly need, and don’t expect one tent to do it all.
  • Capacity:
    Tents are typically classified by sleeping capacity (i.e. one-person, two-person, etc). However, a tent's stated sleeping capacity usually does not include much (or any) space for your gear and there’s no sizing standard between tent manufacturers. Some users size up.
  • Livability:
    Will you use the tent as a basecamp or is it an emergency shelter only? To determine if you and your gear will fit, look at the shelter’s dimensions, including floor and vestibule square areas, height and headroom (including at the sides), plus the number and placement of doors, gear lofts, and pockets, to assess personal livability, comfort, and footprint.
  • Weight and Packed Size:
    If you’ll be backpacking, climbing, cycling, or otherwise carrying that shelter, consider its weight, packed size (and your pack it needs to fit in), and its space-to-weight ratio before automatically opting for the bigger tent. Paddlers and car campers have more room to work with, but everyone should consider how the tent and its parts pack up for stowage.
  • Design:
    Tents come in various designs. Freestanding tents can stand alone without stakes or guy lines and can be easily moved or have dirt and other debris shaken out without being disassembled, though they still need to be staked out. Rounded, geodesic domes are stable and able to withstand heavy snow loads and wind. Tunnel tents are narrow and rectangular, and large family cabin tents are best for warm-weather campground outings.
  • Other features and specs to consider include single versus double-wall, ease of setup, stability, weather resistance, ventilation, , and any noteworthy features.
  • Read more in our guide to tents.