Tents and Shelters

Ready for a night out? Whether you’re an ultralight alpinist, family of backpackers, devoted hanger, or comfort camper, you'll find the best tents, tarps, and hammocks for your outdoor overnights right here.

Check out our top picks below—including price comparisons—to shelter you in any terrain, trip, or season: winter mountaineering, three-season thru-hiking, warm weather car camping, hammock hanging, alpine bivys, tarps, and emergency shelter.

Or you can browse our thousands of independent tent and shelter ratings and reviews by product type, brand, or price. Written by real-world hikers, backpackers, alpinists, climbers, and paddlers, Trailspace community reviews will help you select a dependable, field-tested, outdoor abode just right for your next adventure.

Learn more about how to choose a tent/shelter below »


3-4 Season Convertible
Warm Weather
Bivy Sacks
Tarps and Shelters


Sierra Designs
Nite Ize
Eagles Nest Outfitters
Gossamer Gear
Lawson Equipment




less than $25
$25 - $49.99
$50 - $99.99
$100 - $199.99
$200 - $299.99
$300 - $399.99
$400 - $499.99
$500 and above

Recent Tent/Shelter Reviews

Quest (Dick's) 10x10 Sun Shelter

rated 1 of 5 stars Flimsy at best, piece of crap. Could be a good design, but all parts are too thin and weak to stand up to any type of winds. Full review

Eureka! Summit

rated 2.5 of 5 stars This is a 4-season tent which is very easy to set up and take down, pack, and carry. It does not seem to be to waterproof, as every time I camp and get caught in the rain I do get wet. Full review

Eagles Nest Outfitters Fast Fly Rain Tarp

rated 4.5 of 5 stars Great tarp, upgraded the paracord. Have not used over a hammock. Might at some point, but I prefer sleeping in a tent. Got the tarp so I would not be tent bound in a rainstorm. Removed the cords that came with it, and replaced with four Sea to Summit reflective accessory cords. Brought it on a solo canoe trip on Lower Saranac Lake July 2015. Attached tarp to four trees and it covered all my supplies laid out on picnic table provided on my primitive Island campsite. The second night it poured. I… Full review

Kelty Gunnison 1.3

rated 4.5 of 5 stars Great solo tent. Bought the Kelty Salida 1 originally, but exchanged it for the Gunnison 1.3 due to the Salida's lack of fly vents. Have used it in a very heavy rainstorm while canoe camping and it held up great. Was warm in it in 30 degree weather in Harriman State Park in a 35 degree bag. The square bag is different (shorter pole sections), but it fits nicely in the middle of a pack. Can be packed small with practice. Full review

Grand Trunk Ultralight Hammock

rated 4 of 5 stars I don't always sleep in a hammock, but when I do, I sleep in this one. My son and I found this hammock tangled up thirty feet in a tree in the middle of nowhere. I have no idea how it got there (windstorm?), but retrieving it was pretty challenging. Gear adrift is a gift, as they say in the Marines. I have just kind of kept it around and never got to use it till this summer with the clones on an easy hike. I stuffed it in Child #2's pack, because there was no room in the tent, and made him the guinea… Full review

Therm-a-Rest Slacker Hammock Warmer

rated 4 of 5 stars Therm-a-Rest’s Slacker Hammock Warmer is a lightweight, quick attachment to cut the chill on mild summer evenings. It is not an under quilt, nor does it provide three-season insulation. What it does, it does well. However, what it does is limited and is very expensive for a few degrees of comfort. A Warmer, NOT an Underquilt Therm-a-Rest is coming in rather late to the hammock game. Rather than target avid backcountry hammock users— who tend to rely on cottage industry manufacturers—marketing… Full review

Big Agnes Copper Spur UL2 mtnGLO

rated 4 of 5 stars Big Agnes has taken one of the best backpacking tents on the market, its Copper Spur UL2, and made it even better by adding integrated LED lights, called mtnGLO. In addition to adding the lights, they also updated the color scheme to a dark gray, light gray, and orange. Not only is this sub-three pound tent beautiful, it is incredibly functional as it is free-standing, has two big full sized doors and two large full-coverage vestibules, and can handle just about any weather thrown its way. In addition… Full review

Eureka! Taron 2

rated 5 of 5 stars Well designed, lightweight, dry. I purchased this tent because I have another Eureka tent and they are quality built for the price. This tent can be set up in minutes, its side vestibule design allows you to enter and exit without having to crawl in and back out. The inside has enough room for me my bed and all my gear without feeling cramped and the vestibule has enough room to store my Helinox chair and table. The side entry also gives you more privacy when you are in the tent with the door open. Full review

The North Face Tadpole 23

rated 0.5 of 5 stars I bought this tent in 2007, used it 2 or 3 times each year, and the fly became sticky and is not waterproof anymore since 2 or 3 years. I contacted TNF. They told me it is out of warranty. But sure I am not even thinking about buying products from them. Full review

Top-Rated Tents and Shelters

Sort by: name | rating | price | availability | recently reviewed

Coghlan's ABS Tent Pegs Stake
Coghlan's Cord-lok Tent Accessory
REI Aluminum Hook Tent Stake Stake
Sierra Designs Hex Peg Stake
$2 - $14
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Nite Ize Gear Tie Tent Accessory
$2 - $25
Vargo Aluminum Summit Tent Stake Stake
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (12)
MSR Groundhog Tent Stake Stake
$2 - $19
user rating: 4 of 5 (2)
Nite Ize CamJam Cord Tightener Tent Accessory
$2 - $6
Coghlan's Mini Stretch Cord Tent Accessory
Coghlan's Stretch Cord Tent Accessory
Reliance Power Peg Stake
$2 - $3
Eagles Nest Outfitters Hammock Repair Kit Hammock Accessory
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
MSR Mini Groundhog Stake Stake
$2 - $17
Coghlan's Nail Pegs Stake
$2 - $3
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Nite Ize Figure 9 Carabiner Tent Accessory
$2 - $9
Nite Ize Figure 9 Rope Tightener Tent Accessory
$2 - $6
Gossamer Gear Tite-Lite Titanium Tent Stakes Stake
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Lawson Equipment Titanium Tent Stake Stake
Vargo Titanium Tent Stake Stake
Easton Nano Tent Stake Stake
$3 - $19
Ultimate Survival Technologies Emergency Survival Bag Bivy Sack
Coghlan's Tarp Holder Tent Accessory
Coghlan's Aluminum Tent Pegs Stake
Brooks-Range Tensioner Cord Set Tent Accessory
Coghlan's Skewer Pegs Stake
Outbound All Purpose Tarp Tarp/Shelter
Snow Peak Solid Stake Stake
$4 - $11
user rating: 2 of 5 (2)
Vargo Titanium Ascent Tent Stake Stake
Vargo Titanium Crevice Stake Stake
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
Vargo Titanium Nail Peg Stake
Eagles Nest Outfitters DripStrips Hammock Accessory
MSR Blizzard Stake Stake
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Coghlan's Tarp Clips Tent Accessory
Coghlan's Steel Tent Stakes Stake
Coghlan's Braided Nylon Cord Tent Accessory
Coghlan's Tent Whisk & Dust Pan Tent Accessory
NRS River Wing Spare Plastic Stakes Stake
Liberty Mountain Para Cord Tent Accessory
UCO StakeLights Stake
Eagles Nest Outfitters Ridgeline 2 with Prusik Knots Hammock Accessory
MSR Cyclone Stake Stake
$5 - $24
NRS River Wing Spare Metal Stakes Stake
Sea to Summit Accessory Carabiner Set Tent Accessory
Gear Aid Strap Tender Tent Accessory
Coghlan's LED Nail Pegs Stake
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
Dutchware Ridgeline Biners Hammock Accessory
Evernew Titanium Peg Stake
NRS River Wing Spare Rope Set Tent Accessory
Slumberjack Steel Stakes Stake
Kelty Sand Bag Stake Stake
$7 - $8
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What’s the “best” tent or shelter for you? Consider your personal outdoor needs, preferences, and budget:

  • Conditions:
    First, and most important, in what seasons, conditions, and terrain will you use your tent, tarp, or hammock? Choose a shelter that can handle the conditions you expect to encounter (rain, snow, wind, heat, humidity, biting insects, an energetic scout troop), but don’t buy more tent than you truly need, and don’t expect one tent to do it all.
  • Capacity:
    Tents are typically classified by sleeping capacity (i.e. one-person, two-person, etc). However, a tent's stated sleeping capacity usually does not include much (or any) space for your gear and there’s no sizing standard between tent manufacturers. Some users size up.
  • Livability:
    Will you use the tent as a basecamp or is it an emergency shelter only? To determine if you and your gear will fit, look at the shelter’s dimensions, including floor and vestibule square areas, height and headroom (including at the sides), plus the number and placement of doors, gear lofts, and pockets, to assess personal livability, comfort, and footprint.
  • Weight and Packed Size:
    If you’ll be backpacking, climbing, cycling, or otherwise carrying that shelter, consider its weight, packed size (and your pack it needs to fit in), and its space-to-weight ratio before automatically opting for the bigger tent. Paddlers and car campers have more room to work with, but everyone should consider how the tent and its parts pack up for stowage.
  • Design:
    Tents come in various designs. Freestanding tents can stand alone without stakes or guy lines and can be easily moved or have dirt and other debris shaken out without being disassembled, though they still need to be staked out. Rounded, geodesic domes are stable and able to withstand heavy snow loads and wind. Tunnel tents are narrow and rectangular, and large family cabin tents are best for warm-weather campground outings.
  • Other features and specs to consider include single versus double-wall, ease of setup, stability, weather resistance, ventilation, , and any noteworthy features.
  • Read more in our guide to tents.