Tents and Shelters

Ready for a night out? Whether you’re an ultralight alpinist, family of backpackers, devoted hanger, or comfort camper, you'll find the best tents, tarps, and hammocks for your outdoor overnights right here.

Check out our top picks below—including price comparisons—to shelter you in any terrain, trip, or season: winter mountaineering, three-season thru-hiking, warm weather car camping, hammock hanging, alpine bivys, tarps, and emergency shelter.

Or you can browse our thousands of independent tent and shelter ratings and reviews by product type, brand, or price. Written by real-world hikers, backpackers, alpinists, climbers, and paddlers, Trailspace community reviews will help you select a dependable, field-tested, outdoor abode just right for your next adventure.

Learn more about how to choose a tent/shelter below »

Category

Four-Season
3-4 Season Convertible
Three-Season
Warm Weather
Bivy Sacks
Tarps and Shelters
Hammocks
Bug Nets
Accessories

Brands

Coghlan's
REI
Vargo
MSR
Hilleberg
Nite Ize
Gossamer Gear
Lawson Equipment
Sea to Summit
Liberty Bottleworks

User

Unisex
Kids'

Price

less than $25
$25 - $49.99
$50 - $99.99
$100 - $199.99
$200 - $299.99
$300 - $399.99
$400 - $499.99
$500 and above

Recent Tent/Shelter Reviews

MSR Remote 2

rated 5 of 5 stars If strength and livability are your goals in a four season tent the Remote 2 may be for you. MSR Remote 2 The MSR Remote 2 is a tent for when you KNOW the weather will be a challenge and you want a livable shelter; more than just a Black Diamond Firstlight/Eldorado or Mountain Hardwear Direkt 2. I own two other  4-season tents and one three season one, and I have “slept” in a wind-shredded 3-season tent at 9,000 feet.  I've also survived several raging wind and rainstorms in a casket-sized,… Full review

Appy Trails Mark V

rated 4 of 5 stars Light weight and a lot of room I got this as a way of reducing my load on summer-friendly climate trips.. Well, I bought too much tent. This thing is big, and not just big but with an extraordinarily high peak, something like 5' high at the door.  The tent is essentially a light weight version of a tent once used by the Boy Scouts for events like Piedmont. It requires either the light weight pole that is supplied or a trekking pole. The foot end requires a 12" aluminum rod that keeps that end of… Full review

Kelty Gunnison 2

rated 4 of 5 stars Outstanding tent for warm to moderate cold, rain, wind and snow. Sturdy and reliable. This tent lasted from around 2006 when it was purchased until the end of 2016 with heavy use in every season in Southern Arizona, and in Spring, Summer and Fall in Southern Utah, Northern New Mexico, and Oregon. New bungee cords were installed in the poles in about 2012 or 2013 because they were really loose and worn. I fixed the zippers once on both entry ways in 2014 and 2015. By 2016 there were a number… Full review

Tarptent Scarp 1

rated 4.5 of 5 stars I am rating the newer 2016 model. Adaptable, four-season capability in a small(ish) package. I purchased the 2016 updated model last summer with the basic included solid interior.  I've used the Scarp in varying conditions with no issues, other than it being an equivalent to a hot box with the solid inner during warmer weather.  I will list the new specs first: Extra wide interior states it can allow two pads and sleep two people. Please be VERY comfortable with this other person responsible… Full review

YAMA Mountain Gear Cirriform Tarp 1P - 0.8 oz Dyneema

rated 5 of 5 stars Versatile quality, handmade, full weather protection in a sleek design. I purchased the DW Cirriform in .8 cuben but use the tarp alone during the shoulder season and have grown to love the versatility of the entire kit. I was hesitant to switch to cuben/dynemma after only using sil shelters for so long, but the weight savings in this piece while still having full weather protection from anything that nature throws your way is exhilarating!  Gen at Yama is great to work with and understanding of… Full review

The North Face Apogee 24

rated 4 of 5 stars Sturdy and yellow. Heavy but strong. 7 lbs. Big in your pack, but not bad if you need it this strong in snow and wind. Could fit three people inside if needed. Floor is starting to get sticky but top not delaminating. Yet. For camping below treeline it's overkill and no view outside, limited ventilation. In snow it's great, needs 2 stakes for vestibule but holds up otherwise. Similar to Mountain 25. There are cheaper and lighter options now. Look at Warmlite if you can stand flaky customer service. Full review

Marmot Swallow 2P

rated 5 of 5 stars I have had this tent since 2002. I have to say it has lasted better than any tent I know of. I have about 100 days in this tent and it has backpacked and car camped everywhere in the PNW. I think the tents you can get now are better with material and weight, but I returned a Mountain Hardwear tent I got as a replacement because it wasn't good enough. Pitch it quick in a puddle of mud and pick it up in two days without getting wet. I am serious. I camped at the Oregon coast numerous times and stayed… Full review

Eureka! Mountain Pass 3XTE

rated 5 of 5 stars Bomb proof tent. I bought this tent a few years ago after using a friend's Eureka tent for a while on and off. They certainly build quality products at reasonable prices. The tent is super easy to pitch, although I always struggle with the fly pole. There are plenty of wind stays to string the tent tight to support heavy winds and if pitched properly it can handle snow. All wind ties have a reflective marker, which is great at night so you don't trip. The best points about this tent are: Space. Full review

Sierra Designs Superflash

rated 5 of 5 stars I bought one of these when I was 16 in about 1990. It finally died last year (shock cord broke while setting up in a windstorm... lost poles). It was a sad day. It was a perfect tent. As other post say, good for almost any camp...all around solid performer. Wish I could get another one. I remember coming back from an attempt to climb Mt Rainer. We turned back due to a bad storm.  My good old Super Flash was standing strong. I was half convinced as we were hiking down that it might have been blown… Full review

Top-Rated Tents and Shelters

Sort by: name | rating | price | availability | recently reviewed

Coghlan's ABS Tent Pegs Stake
$1
Coghlan's Aluminum Tent Pegs Stake
$1 - $2
REI Aluminum Hook Tent Stake Stake
$2
Coghlan's Nail Pegs Stake
$2
Vargo Aluminum Summit Tent Stake Stake
$16
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
MSR Needle Stake Kit Stake
$2 - $14
Coghlan's Guy Line Adapters Tent Accessory
$2
Coghlan's Guy Ropes with Slides Tent Accessory
$2
Hilleberg Tent Pole Holder Tent Accessory
$2
user rating: 4 of 5 (2)
Nite Ize CamJam Cord Tightener Tent Accessory
$2 - $6
Coghlan's Mini Stretch Cord Tent Accessory
$2
Nite Ize Figure 9 Rope Tightener Tent Accessory
$2 - $6
Gossamer Gear Tite-Lite Titanium Tent Stakes Stake
$3
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Lawson Equipment Titanium Tent Stake Stake
$3 MSRP
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
MSR Mini Groundhog Stake Stake
$3
Vargo Titanium Tent Stake Stake
$3
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Nite Ize Figure 9 Carabiner Tent Accessory
$3 - $10
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (12)
MSR Groundhog Tent Stake Stake
$3 - $19
Sea to Summit Ground Control Tent Peg Stake
$3 - $26
Coghlan's Steel Tent Stakes Stake
$3
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Coghlan's Tarp Clips Tent Accessory
$3
Coghlan's Skewer Pegs Stake
$3
Liberty Bottleworks Bug Head Net Bug Net
$3
Ultimate Survival Technologies Emergency Survival Bag Bivy Sack
$3
REI Snow Stake Stake
$3
Eagles Nest Outfitters Hammock Repair Kit Hammock Accessory
$3
Coghlan's Stretch Cord Tent Accessory
$3
Coghlan's Polypropylene Tent Pegs Stake
$3
Coghlan's Tent Whisk & Dust Pan Tent Accessory
$3 - $4
Coghlan's Ultralight Tent Stakes Stake
$3
Coghlan's Infants Mosquito Net Bug Net
$3
Coghlan's No-See-Um Head Net Bug Net
$4
Snow Peak Solid Stake Stake
$4 - $6
Liberty Mountain Paracord Tent Accessory
$4
user rating: 2 of 5 (2)
Vargo Titanium Ascent Tent Stake Stake
$24
Vargo Titanium Crevice Stake Stake
$24
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
Vargo Titanium Nail Peg Stake
$27
Nite Ize KnotBone Adjustable Bungee Tent Accessory
$4
Reliance Power Peg Stake
$4 - $7
 
Brooks-Range Tensioner Cord Set Tent Accessory
$4
UCO StakeLights Stake
$4
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Coghlan's Deluxe Mosquito Head Net Bug Net
$5
 
Eagles Nest Outfitters Ridgeline 2 with Prusik Knots Hammock Accessory
$5
Eagles Nest Outfitters Aluminum Wiregate Carabiner Hammock Accessory
$5
Eagles Nest Outfitters DripStrips Hammock Accessory
$5
MSR Blizzard Stake Stake
$5 - $24
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Nite Ize Gear Tie Tent Accessory
$5 - $25
NRS River Wing Spare Plastic Stakes Stake
$5
Outbound All Purpose Tarp Tarp/Shelter
$5
Evernew Titanium Peg Stake
$6
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What’s the “best” tent or shelter for you? Consider your personal outdoor needs, preferences, and budget:

  • Conditions:
    First, and most important, in what seasons, conditions, and terrain will you use your tent, tarp, or hammock? Choose a shelter that can handle the conditions you expect to encounter (rain, snow, wind, heat, humidity, biting insects, an energetic scout troop), but don’t buy more tent than you truly need, and don’t expect one tent to do it all.
  • Capacity:
    Tents are typically classified by sleeping capacity (i.e. one-person, two-person, etc). However, a tent's stated sleeping capacity usually does not include much (or any) space for your gear and there’s no sizing standard between tent manufacturers. Some users size up.
  • Livability:
    Will you use the tent as a basecamp or is it an emergency shelter only? To determine if you and your gear will fit, look at the shelter’s dimensions, including floor and vestibule square areas, height and headroom (including at the sides), plus the number and placement of doors, gear lofts, and pockets, to assess personal livability, comfort, and footprint.
  • Weight and Packed Size:
    If you’ll be backpacking, climbing, cycling, or otherwise carrying that shelter, consider its weight, packed size (and your pack it needs to fit in), and its space-to-weight ratio before automatically opting for the bigger tent. Paddlers and car campers have more room to work with, but everyone should consider how the tent and its parts pack up for stowage.
  • Design:
    Tents come in various designs. Freestanding tents can stand alone without stakes or guy lines and can be easily moved or have dirt and other debris shaken out without being disassembled, though they still need to be staked out. Rounded, geodesic domes are stable and able to withstand heavy snow loads and wind. Tunnel tents are narrow and rectangular, and large family cabin tents are best for warm-weather campground outings.
  • Other features and specs to consider include single versus double-wall, ease of setup, stability, weather resistance, ventilation, , and any noteworthy features.
  • Read more in our guide to tents.