Tents and Shelters

Ready for a night out? Whether you’re an ultralight alpinist, family of backpackers, devoted hanger, or comfort camper, you'll find the best tents, tarps, and hammocks for your outdoor overnights right here.

Check out our top picks below—including price comparisons—to shelter you in any terrain, trip, or season: winter mountaineering, three-season thru-hiking, warm weather car camping, hammock hanging, alpine bivys, tarps, and emergency shelter.

Or you can browse our thousands of independent tent and shelter ratings and reviews by product type, brand, or price. Written by real-world hikers, backpackers, alpinists, climbers, and paddlers, Trailspace community reviews will help you select a dependable, field-tested, outdoor abode just right for your next adventure.

Learn more about how to choose a tent/shelter below »

Categories

Four-Season
3-4 Season Convertible
Three-Season
Warm Weather
Bivy Sacks
Tarps and Shelters
Hammocks
Bug Nets
Accessories

Brands

Coghlan's
REI
Sierra Designs
Vargo
MSR
Nite Ize
Hilleberg
Gossamer Gear
Lawson Equipment
Liberty Bottleworks

Genders

Unisex
Men's
Kids'

Price

less than $25
$25 - $49.99
$50 - $99.99
$100 - $199.99
$200 - $299.99
$300 - $399.99
$400 - $499.99
$500 and above

Recent Tent/Shelter Reviews

Sierra Designs Lightning 2 FL

rated 5 of 5 stars This tent sets up extremely easily, even alone, and at just over 3# packed weight, is still super light. I could set it up with the footprint and guying out the vestibules in about 6 minutes by myself. It tears down and packs back up in about the same time. This tent was an excellent choice for my week-long hike in the Emigrant Wilderness. Although made to sleep two, it is still an excellent choice if going it alone. I highly recommend it for anyone on a long outing or just a long weekend. This… Full review

Black Diamond Squall

rated 4 of 5 stars Good for $400, but some improvements should be made. My Squall works for 5 years. A rain and wind-resistance I would rate for - 5°, snow proof - 5°. I used it up to 4500 m. The most problem is a pole construction aka Y-shape. Try to assemble it in a windy environment and you got nervous. The same for outer tent which you need to put on only after the inner tent is standing. But try this when it is heavy rain...nightmare. Small pockets only for pair of socks and radio. But it is really light and… Full review

Sierra Designs Orion AST

rated 5 of 5 stars I love this tent!!! I love this tent! I have had it over 10 years and it was exactly what I was looking for. It is lightweight and very easy to set up. I have done it by myself for years. It packs right away. The ultralight poles are strong and will not shatter like the old fiberglass poles. It pitches tautly and I have had it in high winds with no problem at all. I have had no problems with rain or wind. I have re-waterproofed it several times with no problem. The ventilation is good. It is just… Full review

Big Agnes Tumble 1 mtnGLO

rated 4 of 5 stars Good all over backpack tent. Big Agnes makes a great tent. The color choice is not for me, but for the price could not beat it. I'm 6' 240 and have no problems with its size. Full review

ALPS Mountaineering Meramac 2

rated 3 of 5 stars Great little tent for car camping on a clear night on dry ground. I took a chance buying this tent, knowing that the fly didn't cover the doors was a bit worrisome but other reviews I read didn't find this to be a problem, even in heavy rain. It's been crazy hot lately but hasn't rained too much, so I chose ventilation over a full-length rain fly. Bad decision.   My first time using it was the rainiest weekend I can recall in a long time, and the tent really did not perform well. Unfortunately… Full review

Grand Trunk Nano-7

rated 2.5 of 5 stars Loved this hammock and used it despite being almost 6' 2", until it ripped... Wish it were a bit more durable as I loved the stuff size After having the hammock for 2 1/2 years of minimal use (2 or 3 nights in back yard) + 6 nights with my son in it for backpacking (he's 8 and weighs less than 50 lbs) the hammock fabric ripped on me while I was sitting in it. With the questionable strength I'd go with a parachute nylon vs. this ripstop nylon for durability. Also the cheap $20 parachute hammocks… Full review

Big Agnes Tensleep Station 4

rated 4 of 5 stars A highly versatile and cleverly designed tent that has some baffling omissions. I purchased this tent for an 18-day self-supported Grand Canyon trip so that I would have something tall enough to set up roll-a-cots in if the monsoon hit us. It did, fortunately for only three nights in all, but the Tensleep Station 4 worked very well for my intended purpose. Setup is very logical, with color-coded tabs on the tent and fly to make sure it is aligned correctly. There are four poles in all, three of… Full review

LiteFighter 1 Camo Tent

rated 5 of 5 stars This tent was tested against extreme wind and rain and came out a success. A little spendy, but worth it! I used the Litefighter 1 for the first time while camping for five days in Oklahoma. This tent was put to the test with both >50 MPH wind gusts and > 2 inches of rain in a 24-hour period. This tent was a resounding success. During the night I'd hear the wind pick up and think, "this is it...this tent is going to blow over." It never did.  It kept me dry the entire trip.   The integrated… Full review

Eagles Nest Outfitters SoloPod Hammock Stand

rated 4 of 5 stars This sturdy, easy to set up hammock stand provides convenience and freedom—more hammock time without the need for trees or straps. Though, not as portable as described by ENO. Now I can use my ENO & Hennessy Hammocks anywhere I wish, no trees nor straps needed. Eight pieces snap together easily and I’m ready to hang my hammock. Its sturdy construction allows it to remain stable and balanced on different terrains, as I chase the ever-moving shade in my backyard. Its shapely aesthetic and… Full review

Top-Rated Tents and Shelters

Sort by: name | rating | price | availability | recently reviewed

Coghlan's ABS Tent Pegs Stake
$1
Coghlan's Cord-lok Tent Accessory
$1
REI Aluminum Hook Tent Stake Stake
$2
Sierra Designs Hex Peg Stake
$2 - $159
 
Vargo Aluminum Summit Tent Stake Stake
$16
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
MSR Needle Stake Kit Stake
$2 - $14
Nite Ize Figure 9 Rope Tightener Tent Accessory
$2 - $6
Hilleberg Tent Pole Holder Tent Accessory
$2
user rating: 4 of 5 (2)
Nite Ize CamJam Cord Tightener Tent Accessory
$2 - $6
Coghlan's Mini Stretch Cord Tent Accessory
$2
Coghlan's Mosquito Head Net Bug Net
$2
Coghlan's Nail Pegs Stake
$2 - $3
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
MSR Mini Groundhog Stake Stake
$2 - $16
Gossamer Gear Tite-Lite Titanium Tent Stakes Stake
$3
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Lawson Equipment Titanium Tent Stake Stake
$3 MSRP
Coghlan's Stretch Cord Tent Accessory
$3
Vargo Titanium Tent Stake Stake
$3
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Nite Ize Figure 9 Carabiner Tent Accessory
$3 - $10
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (12)
MSR Groundhog Tent Stake Stake
$3 - $19
 
Liberty Bottleworks Bug Head Net Bug Net
$3
Ultimate Survival Technologies Emergency Survival Bag Bivy Sack
$3
REI Snow Stake Stake
$3
Eagles Nest Outfitters Hammock Repair Kit Hammock Accessory
$3
Coghlan's Tarp Holder Tent Accessory
$3
Coghlan's Aluminum Tent Pegs Stake
$3
Eagles Nest Outfitters DripStrips Hammock Accessory
$3 - $4
Coghlan's Skewer Pegs Stake
$3
Coghlan's No-See-Um Head Net Bug Net
$4
Snow Peak Solid Stake Stake
$4 - $6
Vargo Titanium Crevice Stake Stake
$4 MSRP
user rating: 2 of 5 (2)
Vargo Titanium Ascent Tent Stake Stake
$24
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
Vargo Titanium Nail Peg Stake
$27
Liberty Mountain Paracord Tent Accessory
$4 - $87
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Coghlan's Tarp Clips Tent Accessory
$4
Coghlan's Steel Tent Stakes Stake
$4
Coghlan's Braided Nylon Cord Tent Accessory
$4
Coghlan's Tent Whisk & Dust Pan Tent Accessory
$4
 
Brooks-Range Tensioner Cord Set Tent Accessory
$4
UCO StakeLights Stake
$4
 
Eagles Nest Outfitters Ridgeline 2 with Prusik Knots Hammock Accessory
$5
MSR Blizzard Stake Stake
$5 - $24
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Nite Ize Gear Tie Tent Accessory
$5 - $25
Coghlan's Mosquito Netting Bug Net
$5
Nite Ize KnotBone Adjustable Bungee Tent Accessory
$5
 
Reliance Power Peg Stake
$5
MSR Universal Zipper Pulls Tent Accessory
$5 - $9
NRS River Wing Spare Plastic Stakes Stake
$5
 
Outbound All Purpose Tarp Tarp/Shelter
$5
 
Evernew Titanium Peg Stake
$6
MSR Tent Pole Repair Splints Tent Accessory
$6
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What’s the “best” tent or shelter for you? Consider your personal outdoor needs, preferences, and budget:

  • Conditions:
    First, and most important, in what seasons, conditions, and terrain will you use your tent, tarp, or hammock? Choose a shelter that can handle the conditions you expect to encounter (rain, snow, wind, heat, humidity, biting insects, an energetic scout troop), but don’t buy more tent than you truly need, and don’t expect one tent to do it all.
  • Capacity:
    Tents are typically classified by sleeping capacity (i.e. one-person, two-person, etc). However, a tent's stated sleeping capacity usually does not include much (or any) space for your gear and there’s no sizing standard between tent manufacturers. Some users size up.
  • Livability:
    Will you use the tent as a basecamp or is it an emergency shelter only? To determine if you and your gear will fit, look at the shelter’s dimensions, including floor and vestibule square areas, height and headroom (including at the sides), plus the number and placement of doors, gear lofts, and pockets, to assess personal livability, comfort, and footprint.
  • Weight and Packed Size:
    If you’ll be backpacking, climbing, cycling, or otherwise carrying that shelter, consider its weight, packed size (and your pack it needs to fit in), and its space-to-weight ratio before automatically opting for the bigger tent. Paddlers and car campers have more room to work with, but everyone should consider how the tent and its parts pack up for stowage.
  • Design:
    Tents come in various designs. Freestanding tents can stand alone without stakes or guy lines and can be easily moved or have dirt and other debris shaken out without being disassembled, though they still need to be staked out. Rounded, geodesic domes are stable and able to withstand heavy snow loads and wind. Tunnel tents are narrow and rectangular, and large family cabin tents are best for warm-weather campground outings.
  • Other features and specs to consider include single versus double-wall, ease of setup, stability, weather resistance, ventilation, , and any noteworthy features.
  • Read more in our guide to tents.