Tents and Shelters

Ready for a night out? Whether you’re an ultralight alpinist, family of backpackers, devoted hanger, or comfort camper, you'll find the best tents, tarps, and hammocks for your outdoor overnights right here.

Check out our top picks below—including price comparisons—to shelter you in any terrain, trip, or season: winter mountaineering, three-season thru-hiking, warm weather car camping, hammock hanging, alpine bivys, tarps, and emergency shelter.

Or you can browse our thousands of independent tent and shelter ratings and reviews by product type, brand, or price. Written by real-world hikers, backpackers, alpinists, climbers, and paddlers, Trailspace community reviews will help you select a dependable, field-tested, outdoor abode just right for your next adventure.

Learn more about how to choose a tent/shelter below »


3-4 Season Convertible
Warm Weather
Bivy Sacks
Tarps and Shelters


Sierra Designs
Nite Ize
Gossamer Gear
Lawson Equipment
Eagles Nest Outfitters




less than $25
$25 - $49.99
$50 - $99.99
$100 - $199.99
$200 - $299.99
$300 - $399.99
$400 - $499.99
$500 and above

Recent Tent/Shelter Reviews

Mountain Hardwear Approach

rated 3.5 of 5 stars Weatherproof two-person tent that will last for 10 years of moderate careful use. I have owned this tent for I think about 10 years. My wife and I bicycled across the country in it without a single problem under every day use. Even though headroom was at a minimum it also was very low profile which allowed it to withstand serious winds.  Setup is easy and quick. The materials and craftsmanship are very nice. In shopping for a new tent I have noticed that the craftsmanship on Mountain Hardwear and… Full review

The North Face VE 24

rated 5 of 5 stars Quality! It's so cool to hear stories about this tent. I think I bought mine in Honolulu in 1976 or so, so that makes it almost 40 years old. It's been in the Cascades, Rockies, the Wasatch, in snow and rain, and still does the job. After all this time, the elastic in the poles is still hanging in there!  A little looser, like me, but holding the fort together! Zippers still zip. The only flaw is my own fault when I flew it like a kite in the Santa Fe wind, and it got a tear from some thorny bush. Full review

Sierra Designs Sirius 2

rated 5 of 5 stars 10 years of use on three continents. I bought this tent in 2003 prior to hiking Vermont's long trail—300 miles over 30 days and over half of it in the rain. I have never felt the need for a ground tarp. I love the simple design of this tent. It is super light for two people and spacious and comfortable for one. The half fly design has many advantages including great ventilation — and an openness that takes away the claustrophobic nature of small tents. You can sit or lay down and watch the weather… Full review

Kammok Roo

rated 4.5 of 5 stars A great all-purpose camping hammock. The Kammok Roo is only the latest in a series of camping hammocks I have owned, but is my favorite so far! DESIGN: The Roo shows the most attention to detail of any camping hammock I have used to this point.  Its design is similar to the Eagles Nest Outfitters DoubleNest, but with a few key differentiators.   First, the sides of the hammock have multiple gear-attachment-points. These have proven to be quite useful for lanterns (My Snow Peak Mini Hozuki snaps… Full review

Sierra Designs Lightning 2 UL

rated 4 of 5 stars Sierra Designs has a very unique approach to tent and equipment design, and the Flash 2 UL is no different. From the unique structural support to the overall "porch" process, the Flash gives those looking for a fresh new take on tents a way to get out there, in a light, roomy fashion without making huge sacrifices. I recommend for someone looking for more room as a 1-person sleeping option or for lovers who want to be close on their trip. I will put the caveat that I do not have a lot of time in… Full review

Toughstake Large Toughstake

rated 1 of 5 stars Does not work in dirt, way too expensive, waste of time and money. Takes way too long to put into the ground. I am an experienced camper and the Toughstake was just like any other stake that I have used. I blew my money on this thing and I hope that it stops you from making the same mistake that I did. I made a homemade bowl stake and it worked 100% better. Full review

Kelty Noah's Tarp 12

rated 4 of 5 stars This is a great tarp for a decent price and weight. Would recommend. The only reason I give this product four stars is because it has stretched out over time. It's seen its fair share of rain storms, and after setting it up numerous times over the last year it has begun to stretch. This could be user error though, maybe I had it a little too taut. But it has kept me dry more times than I can count and it's a decent weight. There are also a ton of eyelets so you can tie it up a million different… Full review

ALPS Mountaineering Triton 1.5

rated 3.5 of 5 stars I want so badly to love this tent! I do love the design, the amount of room, the double doors/vestibules, and the price. But I just don't like the weight, the constant re-staking to get a taut pitch (wash, rinse, repeat), and the number of stakes required. BUT... if they would make a "NEW, version 2.0" with newer (lighter) materials and construction techniques, and fix the alignment issue with the footprint and tent body/fly, and make smaller more practical storage sack/bags... then I would buy… Full review

Hennessy Hammock Ultralight Backpacker Asym

rated 2 of 5 stars Overly complex and poorly implemented. Over the years, I have owned quite a few camping hammocks. I took this particular one on a 5-day hike through the Smoky Mountains a few years ago, then promptly got rid of it. DESIGN I currently own four camping hammocks (I returned my Hennessy, so it doesn't make the list.). The design of the Hennessy was the most complex of all of them. Like most camping hammocks, the Hennessy uses nylon webbing wrapped around a tree as an anchor point. However, unlike most… Full review

Top-Rated Tents and Shelters

Sort by: name | rating | price | availability | recently reviewed

Coghlan's ABS Tent Pegs Stake
Coghlan's Cord-lok Tent Accessory
REI Aluminum Hook Tent Stake Stake
Sierra Designs Hex Peg Stake
$2 - $14
REI Snow Stake Stake
Vargo Aluminum Summit Tent Stake Stake
Coghlan's Mini Stretch Cord Tent Accessory
Coghlan's Stretch Cord Tent Accessory
Reliance Power Peg Stake
Coghlan's Nail Pegs Stake
$2 - $3
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Nite Ize Figure 9 Carabiner Tent Accessory
$2 - $10
user rating: 4 of 5 (2)
Nite Ize CamJam Cord Tightener Tent Accessory
$2 - $6
Nite Ize Figure 9 Rope Tightener Tent Accessory
$2 - $8
Gossamer Gear Tite-Lite Titanium Tent Stakes Stake
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Lawson Equipment Titanium Tent Stake Stake
Vargo Titanium Tent Stake Stake
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
MSR Mini Groundhog Stake Stake
$3 - $17
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (12)
MSR Groundhog Tent Stake Stake
$3 - $19
Eagles Nest Outfitters Hammock Repair Kit Hammock Accessory
Coghlan's Tarp Holder Tent Accessory
Coghlan's Aluminum Tent Pegs Stake
Coghlan's Skewer Pegs Stake
Snow Peak Solid Stake Stake
$4 - $11
Liberty Mountain Para Cord Tent Accessory
Ultimate Survival Technologies Emergency Survival Bag Bivy Sack
$4 - $5
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Nite Ize Gear Tie Tent Accessory
$4 - $25
user rating: 1.5 of 5 (1)
Vargo Titanium Ascent Tent Stake Stake
Vargo Titanium Crevice Stake Stake
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
Vargo Titanium Nail Peg Stake
Coghlan's Steel Tent Stakes Stake
Coghlan's Braided Nylon Cord Tent Accessory
Coghlan's Tent Whisk & Dust Pan Tent Accessory
Brooks-Range Tensioner Cord Set Tent Accessory
MSR Blizzard Stake Stake
Eagles Nest Outfitters Ridgeline 2 with Prusik Knots Hammock Accessory
Eagles Nest Outfitters DripStrips Hammock Accessory
Texsport Rip-Stop Polyethylene Tarp Tarp/Shelter
NRS River Wing Spare Plastic Stakes Stake
Sea to Summit Accessory Carabiner Set Tent Accessory
Gear Aid Strap Tender Tent Accessory
Coghlan's LED Nail Pegs Stake
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
Dutchware Ridgeline Biners Hammock Accessory
MSR Cyclone Stake Stake
$6 - $24
Evernew Titanium Peg Stake
Sierra Designs Internal Guy Kit Tent Accessory
Liberty Mountain Perlon Accessory Cord Tent Accessory
$7 - $124
NRS River Wing Spare Metal Stakes Stake
Kelty Sand Bag Stake Stake
$7 - $11
Sea to Summit Tent Pole Bag Tent Accessory
Black Diamond Replacement Tent Stakes Stake
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What’s the “best” tent or shelter for you? Consider your personal outdoor needs, preferences, and budget:

  • Conditions:
    First, and most important, in what seasons, conditions, and terrain will you use your tent, tarp, or hammock? Choose a shelter that can handle the conditions you expect to encounter (rain, snow, wind, heat, humidity, biting insects, an energetic scout troop), but don’t buy more tent than you truly need, and don’t expect one tent to do it all.
  • Capacity:
    Tents are typically classified by sleeping capacity (i.e. one-person, two-person, etc). However, a tent's stated sleeping capacity usually does not include much (or any) space for your gear and there’s no sizing standard between tent manufacturers. Some users size up.
  • Livability:
    Will you use the tent as a basecamp or is it an emergency shelter only? To determine if you and your gear will fit, look at the shelter’s dimensions, including floor and vestibule square areas, height and headroom (including at the sides), plus the number and placement of doors, gear lofts, and pockets, to assess personal livability, comfort, and footprint.
  • Weight and Packed Size:
    If you’ll be backpacking, climbing, cycling, or otherwise carrying that shelter, consider its weight, packed size (and your pack it needs to fit in), and its space-to-weight ratio before automatically opting for the bigger tent. Paddlers and car campers have more room to work with, but everyone should consider how the tent and its parts pack up for stowage.
  • Design:
    Tents come in various designs. Freestanding tents can stand alone without stakes or guy lines and can be easily moved or have dirt and other debris shaken out without being disassembled, though they still need to be staked out. Rounded, geodesic domes are stable and able to withstand heavy snow loads and wind. Tunnel tents are narrow and rectangular, and large family cabin tents are best for warm-weather campground outings.
  • Other features and specs to consider include single versus double-wall, ease of setup, stability, weather resistance, ventilation, , and any noteworthy features.
  • Read more in our guide to tents.