Tents and Shelters

Ready for a night out? Whether you’re an ultralight alpinist, family of backpackers, devoted hanger, or comfort camper, you'll find the best tents, tarps, and hammocks for your outdoor overnights right here.

Check out our top picks below—including price comparisons—to shelter you in any terrain, trip, or season: winter mountaineering, three-season thru-hiking, warm weather car camping, hammock hanging, alpine bivys, tarps, and emergency shelter.

Or you can browse our thousands of independent tent and shelter ratings and reviews by product type, brand, or price. Written by real-world hikers, backpackers, alpinists, climbers, and paddlers, Trailspace community reviews will help you select a dependable, field-tested, outdoor abode just right for your next adventure.

Learn more about how to choose a tent/shelter below »

Categories

Four-Season
3-4 Season Convertible
Three-Season
Warm Weather
Bivy Sacks
Tarps and Shelters
Hammocks
Accessories

Brands

Coghlan's
SMC
REI
Sierra Designs
Vargo
Nite Ize
MSR
Gossamer Gear
Lawson Equipment
Eagles Nest Outfitters

Genders

Unisex
Men's
Kids'

Price

less than $25
$25 - $49.99
$50 - $99.99
$100 - $199.99
$200 - $299.99
$300 - $399.99
$400 - $499.99
$500 and above

Recent Tent/Shelter Reviews

Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2

rated 2.5 of 5 stars Light and roomy for one, cramped for two, poor design features I own two Big Agnes tents. I am an experienced light/ultralightweight backpacker. My equipment is for 3-season, high altitude backpacking, 10-day to 2 weeks most trips. This tent is light and easy to set up quickly in case of approaching storms. With proper extra guy lines, it can withstand fairly high winds and rain. It has several design flaws. First, the vestibule is only about 8 sq. ft. which is not large enough to cover a backpack,… Full review

Mountain Hardwear Haven 3

rated 2 of 5 stars Like most other reviews.  Nice tent, but the rain fly delaminates at the seams. Weird that all went at the same time. I took it out of the storage bag this late winter. All the seams had shrunk. Not just here and there, but every inch. Mountain Hardwear should call this a manufacturing defect. They clearly are using an inferior material to seal the seams. I question purchasing another. Full review

Hillary 10 Person Rio Grande 4 Room Family Dome Tent

rated 4 of 5 stars I wish I could find another one of these. It is by far the best tent I've owned as being the first tent up and room for everyone on trip. First, if you buy a tent don't take it camping before opening it. Every tent needs its seams sealed simply cuz once you pitch it and stretch the fabric pinholes are going to happen. Put it up in your backyard, seal the seams, spray waterproof sealer all over it, let it dry a day or two, then take it camping. By myself this tent goes up in less than 30 min. It's… Full review

Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2

rated 5 of 5 stars A high-quality, lightweight, dependable performer. I've had this tent out about 40 times in a variety of weather and I couldn't be happier with its performance to date. I think there are some gear choices where you can cut cost and still get a quality product. There are others where it doesn't make sense to try and save a few bucks. This tent is an example of that although if you look around you can definitely find it on sale. While there are a handful of 2P tents that actually work for two people… Full review

Outdoor Research Bug Bivy

rated 3 of 5 stars Very lightweight, delicate, and tight. Setup: If you wish to guy it out properly, it takes longer than most tents. A single fiberglass pole slides through the sleeve pretty easily.bivy guyed outcorner guys in foot box. Another reviewer commented that the mesh rests on your feet so the bugs can still bite. True. You may be able to sew in an eye for an additional guy line to elevate it or a grommet so you can put a small "pup" style stick in to hold it up. Stability: Works fine. If there was ever… Full review

The North Face VE 25

rated 2.5 of 5 stars Good tent, but my 1997 model leaks in two places where the indoor reenforcement/clothing lines can be attached and that is a major problem. Easy pitching, very stable in high winds, weather resistant. My friends walked with one in 9 months from the Trident sub base in Georgia to the Nevada nuclear test site and it only turned pale a bit but withstood all weather including tornados and never leaked and all zippers etc still function well. Mine leaks however at two points. Good ventilations possibilities… Full review

Eureka! Amari Pass 1

rated 4.5 of 5 stars As for the packabilty of this tent, I found that it gets much smaller and manageable on long treks if you pack the poles on the side of your pack separate from the rest. Wish there was a window in the rain fly. But overall a great tent. I have both the solo and 3-person versions. For some reason Eureka U.S. doesn't sell a footprint, but I've ordered/received footprints for both tents from retailers in Canada, though the U.S. company denies their existence. They seem to fit well and are made of exactly… Full review

L.L.Bean King Pine HD 4-Person Dome

rated 5 of 5 stars This is a great tent. My wife and I bought it about three years ago and have used it a half dozen times. It is superb. We have used this tent to go to airplane fly-ins around Florida and Wisconsin. We love this tent. A little on the heavy side for use in our plane but we make it work. The pros above sum it up for us. People are very jealous when they see us with this tent. Like you brought your house with you. The intermediate velcro fly attachments have mostly all pulled off the fly in some very… Full review

Northwest Territory Olympic Cottage Deluxe Cabin Tent

rated 0.5 of 5 stars Water pools during rain and no replacement parts available. Poles punctured holes in the canopy and we cannot find a replacement canopy ANYWHERE. There seems to be a serious design flaw in this. During rain, water pools on the canopy and the poles are not strong enough to withstand the water that pools. Either the poles bend and break or the collapse puncturing the canopy. Replacement parts are impossible to find. Huge waste of a HUGE chunk of money!! Full review

Top-Rated Tents and Shelters

Sort by: name | rating | price | availability | recently reviewed

Coghlan's ABS Tent Pegs Stake
$1
 
Coghlan's Cord-lok Tent Accessory
$1
SMC Sheet Tent Stake Stake
$2
REI Aluminum Hook Tent Stake Stake
$2
Sierra Designs Hex Peg Stake
$2 - $14
REI Snow Stake Stake
$2
Vargo Aluminum Summit Tent Stake Stake
$16
Nite Ize Figure 9 Rope Tightener Tent Accessory
$2 - $6
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (12)
MSR Groundhog Tent Stake Stake
$2 - $19
Coghlan's Mini Stretch Cord Tent Accessory
$2
Coghlan's Stretch Cord Tent Accessory
$2
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
MSR Mini Groundhog Stake Stake
$2 - $17
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Nite Ize Figure 9 Carabiner Tent Accessory
$2 - $10
user rating: 4 of 5 (2)
Nite Ize CamJam Cord Tightener Tent Accessory
$2 - $6
Gossamer Gear Tite-Lite Titanium Tent Stakes Stake
$3
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Lawson Equipment Titanium Tent Stake Stake
$3 MSRP
MSR Blizzard Stake Stake
$3 - $4
Vargo Titanium Tent Stake Stake
$4 - $13
Eagles Nest Outfitters Hammock Repair Kit Hammock Accessory
$3
Snow Peak Solid Stake Stake
$3 - $11
 
Coghlan's Tarp Holder Tent Accessory
$3
Coghlan's Aluminum Tent Pegs Stake
$3
Coghlan's Skewer Pegs Stake
$3
Liberty Mountain Para Cord Tent Accessory
$4
Liberty Mountain Guy Line Adjusters Tent Accessory
$4
 
Vargo Titanium Ascent Tent Stake Stake
$24
Vargo Titanium Crevice Stake Stake
$24
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
Vargo Titanium Nail Peg Stake
$27
Coghlan's Steel Tent Stakes Stake
$4
Coghlan's Nail Pegs Stake
$4
 
Coghlan's Braided Nylon Cord Tent Accessory
$4
Coghlan's Tent Whisk & Dust Pan Tent Accessory
$4
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Nite Ize Gear Tie Tent Accessory
$4 - $25
Eagles Nest Outfitters Ridgeline 2 with Prusik Knots Hammock Accessory
$5
Eagles Nest Outfitters DripStrips Hammock Accessory
$5
Nite Ize KnotBone Adjustable Bungee Tent Accessory
$5 - $9
 
Texsport Rip-Stop Polyethylene Tarp Tarp/Shelter
$5
NRS River Wing Spare Plastic Stakes Stake
$5
Gear Aid Strap Tender Tent Accessory
$6
 
Coghlan's LED Nail Pegs Stake
$6
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
Dutchware Ridgeline Biners Hammock Accessory
$6 MSRP
MSR Cyclone Stake Stake
$6 - $24
 
Evernew Titanium Peg Stake
$6
Sierra Designs Internal Guy Kit Tent Accessory
$7
NRS River Wing Spare Metal Stakes Stake
$7
Reliance Power Peg Stake
$7
Nite Ize S-Biner Plastic Tent Accessory
$7
Sea to Summit Tent Pole Bag Tent Accessory
$8
Black Diamond Replacement Tent Stakes Stake
$8 MSRP
MSR Dry Line Kit Tent Accessory
$8 - $9
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What’s the “best” tent or shelter for you? Consider your personal outdoor needs, preferences, and budget:

  • Conditions:
    First, and most important, in what seasons, conditions, and terrain will you use your tent, tarp, or hammock? Choose a shelter that can handle the conditions you expect to encounter (rain, snow, wind, heat, humidity, biting insects, an energetic scout troop), but don’t buy more tent than you truly need, and don’t expect one tent to do it all.
  • Capacity:
    Tents are typically classified by sleeping capacity (i.e. one-person, two-person, etc). However, a tent's stated sleeping capacity usually does not include much (or any) space for your gear and there’s no sizing standard between tent manufacturers. Some users size up.
  • Livability:
    Will you use the tent as a basecamp or is it an emergency shelter only? To determine if you and your gear will fit, look at the shelter’s dimensions, including floor and vestibule square areas, height and headroom (including at the sides), plus the number and placement of doors, gear lofts, and pockets, to assess personal livability, comfort, and footprint.
  • Weight and Packed Size:
    If you’ll be backpacking, climbing, cycling, or otherwise carrying that shelter, consider its weight, packed size (and your pack it needs to fit in), and its space-to-weight ratio before automatically opting for the bigger tent. Paddlers and car campers have more room to work with, but everyone should consider how the tent and its parts pack up for stowage.
  • Design:
    Tents come in various designs. Freestanding tents can stand alone without stakes or guy lines and can be easily moved or have dirt and other debris shaken out without being disassembled, though they still need to be staked out. Rounded, geodesic domes are stable and able to withstand heavy snow loads and wind. Tunnel tents are narrow and rectangular, and large family cabin tents are best for warm-weather campground outings.
  • Other features and specs to consider include single versus double-wall, ease of setup, stability, weather resistance, ventilation, , and any noteworthy features.
  • Read more in our guide to tents.