Tents and Shelters

Ready for a night out? Whether you’re an ultralight alpinist, family of backpackers, devoted hanger, or comfort camper, you'll find the best tents, tarps, and hammocks for your outdoor overnights right here.

Check out our top picks below—including price comparisons—to shelter you in any terrain, trip, or season: winter mountaineering, three-season thru-hiking, warm weather car camping, hammock hanging, alpine bivys, tarps, and emergency shelter.

Or you can browse our thousands of independent tent and shelter ratings and reviews by product type, brand, or price. Written by real-world hikers, backpackers, alpinists, climbers, and paddlers, Trailspace community reviews will help you select a dependable, field-tested, outdoor abode just right for your next adventure.

Learn more about how to choose a tent/shelter below »

Categories

Four-Season
3-4 Season Convertible
Three-Season
Warm Weather
Bivy Sacks
Tarps and Shelters
Hammocks
Bug Nets
Accessories

Brands

other
ABC Tents
Academy Broadway
AceCamp
Adventure 16
Adventure Designs
Alite
Alpine Design
ALPS Mountaineering
Amok

Genders

Unisex
Men's
Kids'

Price

less than $25
$25 - $49.99
$50 - $99.99
$100 - $199.99
$200 - $299.99
$300 - $399.99
$400 - $499.99
$500 and above

Recent Tent/Shelter Reviews

No Limits Kings Peak II

rated 3 of 5 stars Terrific tent, good size. A little heavy with rain-fly. Small pole broke on third trip. Setup was easy, though tent is not free-standing.  Handles moisture well, no moisture inside with rain-fly on.  Well ventilated with easy roll-up sides. Roomy inside with room (outside tent) under rain-fly for equipment.  Tent and accessories are easy to pack in ample sized bag that compacts down with straps. Tent has handy inside 'junk' pouches hanging from the roof. On the third use the small pole split,… Full review

ALPS Mountaineering Lynx 1

rated 4.5 of 5 stars Lightweight, packs small. Goes up easy. With vestibule, plenty of room for sleeping and your gear. Great for backpackers who don't share a tent. My first foray into the lightweight backpacking tent. It fit nicely into my pack as it was small enough to lie sideways right into the sleeping bag compartment. It has two poles with the simplest "X" setup design — no origami skills required. Inside I can lay down completely, AND, do a complete sit-up without touching my head on any part of the roof. Full review

MSR Mutha Hubba

rated 4.5 of 5 stars This is an excellent choice for two- to three-people hiking trips. The tent comfortably fits three average sized people, the twin vestibules will hold the gear, and the ventilation is adequate. Just be sure to use a footprint and guy out the fly on the sides of the tent. This is an excellent tent for small group hiking trips. It is lightweight, waterproof, and surprisingly durable for it being made out of fairly lightweight materials. I really like that it actually fits three average to tall adults… Full review

REI Chrysalis UL Tent

rated 3.5 of 5 stars This tent is a very lightweight tent and great option for people seeking a cheap lightweight tent for their expeditions. The REI Chrysalis is a very minimalist tent and does not offer much from but is still comfortable to sleep in I love the REI Chrysalis. This tent is ultralight and almost comparable to Big Agnes tents that are almost double or triple its price. Weighing in at only 3 lb it is a great option for all backpackers. There is not much interior space but you can make it work and feel… Full review

Fjallraven Abisko Endurance 2

rated 5 of 5 stars Bought this for summer hiking in Lapland and other places. Also meaning to use it at winter time later when skiing. Very good tent for hiking. Bought this for summer hiking in Lapland. Also meaning to use it at winter time when skiing. First used it when it was mid summer and at a mountain in Lapland. It was really nice because there is space for backpack, hiking shoes, and wet clothes in the vestibule. Also this Endurance model has equal height from middle to backwards and that is good because… Full review

REI Arete ASL 2 Tent

rated 4 of 5 stars Nice tent for the weight, but a little on the thin side. The fabric is just OK and not as durable as high end tents... however the weight is saved. Overall worth the money. Lightweight, pretty durable, good quality, and REI one-year warranty. The cheap stakes (not enough) and guy ropes are a joke. I replaced them immediately. Using the vestibule entrance with two people is a pain because it's small. Nice that it has plenty of room inside for two and the packed size and weight are worth the money. Full review

MSR Elixir 2

rated 5 of 5 stars Excellent tent for an affordable price. Top option if one doesn't need an ultra light product. Well suited for paddlers if weight is less of a concern. I used this tent on a kayaking tour in the Ammassalik region in East Greenland in the summer of 2016. We were seven persons on the trip. Because of the odd number I needed a tent just for myself. I own a three-person-tent which is too big for this use. It was also clear that I would have only the stern compartment of a 17 ft. kayak for my personal… Full review

Grand Trunk Double Parachute Nylon Hammock

rated 4 of 5 stars Wide enough to wrap around you and just the right length for great comfort. Our small, local outfitter carries Grand Trunk as well as ENO hammocks.  Both are comparable in price, quality, and choice of colors.  Where Grand Trunk excels is the perfect balance of size vs. weight for a parachute cloth hammock. The GT Double is wide enough for a low angle diagonal lay and not have to struggle with keeping your bag, pillow, gear, whatever, from falling over the edge. The GT Single is likewise comfortable,… Full review

Peak 1 Apollo

rated 5 of 5 stars Like it a lot!! I bought it used and I still have it 15 years later!! It's good to go for another 15 years I guess. If you want to get rid of yours, I'll be happy to buy it as I lost my poles when I moved last time. I really like this tent, so if you don't, it's time to let it go as they say in the song ;) Full review

Top-Rated Tents and Shelters

Sort by: name | rating | price | availability | recently reviewed

user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Alpine Mountain Gear Solo Plus Alaskan Three-Season Tent
$150 MSRP
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (1)
Atak Outdoor Lighted Tent Stakes Stake
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
Black Polyethylene Plastic Sheeting Tarp Tarp/Shelter
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
BugBaffler Insect Protective Headnet Bug Net
$9 MSRP
 
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Go Roam Hammock Hammock
user rating: 4 of 5 (2)
Jeep 3-Room Screen Combo Dome Tent 3-4 Season Convertible Tent
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Kamp-Rite Oversize Tent Cot Three-Season Tent
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
KidCo PeaPod
$80 MSRP
user rating: 1.5 of 5 (2)
Peaktop 8 Man Big Tunnel Spider Family Group Camping Tent
user rating: 3 of 5 (1)
ProForce Jungle Hammock with Mosquito Net Hammock
$59 MSRP
 
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (1)
Rhino G-4 Grand Geodesic Tent Four-Season Tent
 
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Standing Room 100 Hanging Tent Three-Season Tent
Topist Mosquito Net Hammock Hammock
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Vivere Parachute Nylon Hammock Hammock
 
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
ABC Tents Type 1 Four-Season Tent
discontinued
 
user rating: 3 of 5 (2)
Academy Broadway 6-1/2-Ft. x 7-Ft. 3-Person Dome Tent Three-Season Tent
 
user rating: 0.5 of 5 (1)
Academy Broadway tent Four-Season Tent
AceCamp Multi-Layer Reflective Tent Tarp/Shelter
$24
 
user rating: 4 of 5 (2)
Adventure 16 Bug Bivy Bivy Sack
 
user rating: 4 of 5 (2)
Adventure Designs Diamondback Four-Season Tent
Alite Meadow Mat Under Quilt
$39 - $59
Alite Murphy 2 Three-Season Tent
$219
 
Alite Sierra Shack Three-Season Tent
$120
 
user rating: 0 of 5 (1)
Alpine Design hammock
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (6)
Alpine Design Hiker Biker Three-Season Tent
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Alpine Design Hiker Biker II
 
user rating: 2 of 5 (2)
Alpine Design Horizon Dome 9 Tent
user rating: 0.5 of 5 (3)
Alpine Design Mesa 8 Tent with Screen Porch Three-Season Tent
ALPS Mountaineering 2-Person Floor Saver Footprint
$19
ALPS Mountaineering 3-Person Floor Saver Footprint
$26
ALPS Mountaineering 4-Person Floor Saver Footprint
$30
ALPS Mountaineering 6-Person Floor Saver Footprint
$43
ALPS Mountaineering Aries 2 Three-Season Tent
$168
 
ALPS Mountaineering Aries 2 Floor Saver Footprint
$19
ALPS Mountaineering Aries 3 Three-Season Tent
$189
 
ALPS Mountaineering Aries 3 Floor Saver Footprint
$28
 
ALPS Mountaineering Camp Creek Three-Season Tent
$162
ALPS Mountaineering Camp Creek Two-Room
$227
ALPS Mountaineering Cedar Ridge Rimrock 8 Two Room Three-Season Tent
$230
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
ALPS Mountaineering Chaos 2 Three-Season Tent
$175
ALPS Mountaineering Chaos 2 Floor Saver Footprint
$21
user rating: 4 of 5 (7)
ALPS Mountaineering Chaos 3 Three-Season Tent
$196
ALPS Mountaineering Chaos 3 Floor Saver Footprint
$28
 
user rating: 3 of 5 (2)
ALPS Mountaineering Comet 1.5 Three-Season Tent
discontinued
ALPS Mountaineering Edge 1 Three-Season Tent
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
ALPS Mountaineering Edge 2 Three-Season Tent
discontinued
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (1)
ALPS Mountaineering Edge 4 Three-Season Tent
discontinued
 
ALPS Mountaineering Edge 6 Three-Season Tent
$200
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
ALPS Mountaineering Extreme 2 Three-Season Tent
$175
 
ALPS Mountaineering Extreme 2 Floor Saver Footprint
$19
Page 1 of 72:  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  Next » 

What’s the “best” tent or shelter for you? Consider your personal outdoor needs, preferences, and budget:

  • Conditions:
    First, and most important, in what seasons, conditions, and terrain will you use your tent, tarp, or hammock? Choose a shelter that can handle the conditions you expect to encounter (rain, snow, wind, heat, humidity, biting insects, an energetic scout troop), but don’t buy more tent than you truly need, and don’t expect one tent to do it all.
  • Capacity:
    Tents are typically classified by sleeping capacity (i.e. one-person, two-person, etc). However, a tent's stated sleeping capacity usually does not include much (or any) space for your gear and there’s no sizing standard between tent manufacturers. Some users size up.
  • Livability:
    Will you use the tent as a basecamp or is it an emergency shelter only? To determine if you and your gear will fit, look at the shelter’s dimensions, including floor and vestibule square areas, height and headroom (including at the sides), plus the number and placement of doors, gear lofts, and pockets, to assess personal livability, comfort, and footprint.
  • Weight and Packed Size:
    If you’ll be backpacking, climbing, cycling, or otherwise carrying that shelter, consider its weight, packed size (and your pack it needs to fit in), and its space-to-weight ratio before automatically opting for the bigger tent. Paddlers and car campers have more room to work with, but everyone should consider how the tent and its parts pack up for stowage.
  • Design:
    Tents come in various designs. Freestanding tents can stand alone without stakes or guy lines and can be easily moved or have dirt and other debris shaken out without being disassembled, though they still need to be staked out. Rounded, geodesic domes are stable and able to withstand heavy snow loads and wind. Tunnel tents are narrow and rectangular, and large family cabin tents are best for warm-weather campground outings.
  • Other features and specs to consider include single versus double-wall, ease of setup, stability, weather resistance, ventilation, , and any noteworthy features.
  • Read more in our guide to tents.