Tents and Shelters

Ready for a night out? Whether you’re an ultralight alpinist, family of backpackers, devoted hanger, or comfort camper, you'll find the best tents, tarps, and hammocks for your outdoor overnights right here.

Check out our top picks below—including price comparisons—to shelter you in any terrain, trip, or season: winter mountaineering, three-season thru-hiking, warm weather car camping, hammock hanging, alpine bivys, tarps, and emergency shelter.

Or you can browse our thousands of independent tent and shelter ratings and reviews by product type, brand, or price. Written by real-world hikers, backpackers, alpinists, climbers, and paddlers, Trailspace community reviews will help you select a dependable, field-tested, outdoor abode just right for your next adventure.

Learn more about how to choose a tent/shelter below »

Categories

Four-Season
3-4 Season Convertible
Three-Season
Warm Weather
Bivy Sacks
Tarps and Shelters
Hammocks
Bug Nets
Accessories

Brands

other
ABC Tents
Academy Broadway
AceCamp
Adventure 16
Adventure Designs
Alite
Alpine Design
ALPS Mountaineering
Amok

Genders

Unisex
Men's
Kids'

Price

less than $25
$25 - $49.99
$50 - $99.99
$100 - $199.99
$200 - $299.99
$300 - $399.99
$400 - $499.99
$500 and above

Recent Tent/Shelter Reviews

Kidco Peapod

rated 4 of 5 stars Portable tiny shade providing tent for napping children. Works great at the crag This is one of the best things we got when we had a kid. Every outdoor family with a young child needs one. There is a plus model and a regular model. We have the regular one and as our LO gets bigger we probably will wish we had the plus since it is a bit bigger. This tent packs into a small bundle and pops open easily- Think oval shaped sun visors you put in your windsheild. It weighs about 2.5 pounds but has been… Full review

REI Passage 1 Tent

rated 4.5 of 5 stars Pretty impressed with this 1P tent. It held up better than my nerves. I purchased the Passage 1 a few days before setting out on a PCT hike from White Pass, Wash., to Cascade Locks. The first two nights camping were perfect. On the the third night, in near zero visibility from clouds, I was on Old Snowy Mountain and it was getting dark. I pitched the tent next to what I thought was a wind barrier made from the broke slate-type rock that made up the ridgeline. Tired, hungry, not wanting to make a… Full review

Sierra Designs Backcountry Bivy

rated 4 of 5 stars I've spent 10 plus nights in this bivy so far, in Arizona, Colorado, and Utah. Overall, a great piece of equipment that I plan on continuing to use. Overall, good bivy. Condensation has been the biggest con, but is usually an issue with most bivy sacks. The worst condensation I experienced was after a warm night of intermittent rain storms in Utah—go figure. I stayed dry, but the inside of the bivy and outside of my down bag were pretty wet. Otherwise, I love the bug netting, the size of the bag,… Full review

LightHeart Gear Duo

rated 4 of 5 stars Lightweight hiking tent for backpackers. This past February my husband and I hiked almost 500 miles of the Appalachian Trail. We started at Springer and upon getting over Sassafras Mountain it became very obvious that our current tent wasn't going to cut it. Ended up at an outfitter who sold us a Light Heart Duo. We set the tent up a couple of times along the trail and found it not to our needs. The tent is very lightweight, easy to set up and no need for poles as it uses your trekking poles. There… Full review

Ozark Trail 16 x 9.5 Family Dome Tent

rated 4.5 of 5 stars Eight kids slept in it. Easy to set up by myself. I used it a few times and loved it. Still looks like new. If you follow the instructions it is very easy. It keeps the rain and the bugs out. Full review

Northwest Territory 16' x 14' Extreme Vacation Home

rated 2 of 5 stars I use my mom's tent over the weekend and set it up. A very small gust of wind came and blew it over breaking the 2 "C" poles on one side.. :( Does anyone have this tent that they aren't using anymore that they are willing to let go of or sell me those two sides? I would really appreciate it very much!!! :)  801-814-3878 Full review

Sierra Designs Lightning 2 FL

rated 5 of 5 stars This tent sets up extremely easily, even alone, and at just over 3# packed weight, is still super light. I could set it up with the footprint and guying out the vestibules in about 6 minutes by myself. It tears down and packs back up in about the same time. This tent was an excellent choice for my week-long hike in the Emigrant Wilderness. Although made to sleep two, it is still an excellent choice if going it alone. I highly recommend it for anyone on a long outing or just a long weekend. This… Full review

Black Diamond Squall

rated 4 of 5 stars Good for $400, but some improvements should be made. My Squall works for 5 years. A rain and wind-resistance I would rate for - 5°, snow proof - 5°. I used it up to 4500 m. The most problem is a pole construction aka Y-shape. Try to assemble it in a windy environment and you got nervous. The same for outer tent which you need to put on only after the inner tent is standing. But try this when it is heavy rain...nightmare. Small pockets only for pair of socks and radio. But it is really light and… Full review

Sierra Designs Orion AST

rated 5 of 5 stars I love this tent!!! I love this tent! I have had it over 10 years and it was exactly what I was looking for. It is lightweight and very easy to set up. I have done it by myself for years. It packs right away. The ultralight poles are strong and will not shatter like the old fiberglass poles. It pitches tautly and I have had it in high winds with no problem at all. I have had no problems with rain or wind. I have re-waterproofed it several times with no problem. The ventilation is good. It is just… Full review

Top-Rated Tents and Shelters

Sort by: name | rating | price | availability | recently reviewed

user rating: 3.5 of 5 (1)
Atak Outdoor Lighted Tent Stakes Stake
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
Black Polyethylene Plastic Sheeting Tarp Tarp/Shelter
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
BugBaffler Insect Protective Headnet Bug Net
$9 MSRP
 
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Go Roam Hammock Hammock
user rating: 4 of 5 (2)
Jeep 3-Room Screen Combo Dome Tent 3-4 Season Convertible Tent
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Kamp-Rite Oversize Tent Cot Three-Season Tent
 
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Kidco Peapod
 
user rating: 2.5 of 5 (1)
Peaktop 8 Man Big Tunnel Spider Family Group Camping Tent
user rating: 3 of 5 (1)
ProForce Jungle Hammock with Mosquito Net Hammock
$59 MSRP
 
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (1)
Rhino G-4 Grand Geodesic Tent Four-Season Tent
 
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Standing Room 100 Hanging Tent Three-Season Tent
Topist Mosquito Net Hammock Hammock
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Vivere Parachute Nylon Hammock Hammock
 
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
ABC Tents Type 1 Four-Season Tent
discontinued
 
user rating: 3 of 5 (2)
Academy Broadway 6-1/2-Ft. x 7-Ft. 3-Person Dome Tent Three-Season Tent
 
user rating: 0.5 of 5 (1)
Academy Broadway tent Four-Season Tent
 
AceCamp Multi-Layer Reflective Tent Tarp/Shelter
$30
 
user rating: 4 of 5 (2)
Adventure 16 Bug Bivy Bivy Sack
 
user rating: 4 of 5 (2)
Adventure Designs Diamondback Four-Season Tent
 
Alite Meadow Mat Under Quilt
$60
Alite Murphy 2 Three-Season Tent
$219
Alite Sierra Shack Three-Season Tent
$120 - $199
 
user rating: 0 of 5 (1)
Alpine Design hammock
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (6)
Alpine Design Hiker Biker Three-Season Tent
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Alpine Design Hiker Biker II
 
user rating: 2 of 5 (2)
Alpine Design Horizon Dome 9 Tent
user rating: 0.5 of 5 (3)
Alpine Design Mesa 8 Tent with Screen Porch Three-Season Tent
ALPS Mountaineering 2-Person Floor Saver Footprint
$20
ALPS Mountaineering 3-Person Floor Saver Footprint
$26
ALPS Mountaineering 4-Person Floor Saver Footprint
$30
ALPS Mountaineering 6-Person Floor Saver Footprint
$43
ALPS Mountaineering Aries 2 Three-Season Tent
$168
 
ALPS Mountaineering Aries 2 Floor Saver Footprint
ALPS Mountaineering Aries 3 Three-Season Tent
 
ALPS Mountaineering Aries 3 Floor Saver Footprint
 
ALPS Mountaineering Camp Creek Three-Season Tent
$162
 
ALPS Mountaineering Camp Creek Two-Room
$227
ALPS Mountaineering Cedar Ridge Rimrock 8 Two Room Three-Season Tent
$230
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
ALPS Mountaineering Chaos 2 Three-Season Tent
$175
ALPS Mountaineering Chaos 2 Floor Saver Footprint
$21
user rating: 4 of 5 (7)
ALPS Mountaineering Chaos 3 Three-Season Tent
$196
ALPS Mountaineering Chaos 3 Floor Saver Footprint
$43 MSRP
 
user rating: 3 of 5 (2)
ALPS Mountaineering Comet 1.5 Three-Season Tent
discontinued
ALPS Mountaineering Edge 1 Three-Season Tent
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
ALPS Mountaineering Edge 2 Three-Season Tent
discontinued
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (1)
ALPS Mountaineering Edge 4 Three-Season Tent
$153
 
ALPS Mountaineering Edge 6 Three-Season Tent
$200
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
ALPS Mountaineering Extreme 2 Three-Season Tent
$240 MSRP
 
ALPS Mountaineering Extreme 2 Floor Saver Footprint
$19
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
ALPS Mountaineering Extreme 3 Three-Season Tent
$210
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What’s the “best” tent or shelter for you? Consider your personal outdoor needs, preferences, and budget:

  • Conditions:
    First, and most important, in what seasons, conditions, and terrain will you use your tent, tarp, or hammock? Choose a shelter that can handle the conditions you expect to encounter (rain, snow, wind, heat, humidity, biting insects, an energetic scout troop), but don’t buy more tent than you truly need, and don’t expect one tent to do it all.
  • Capacity:
    Tents are typically classified by sleeping capacity (i.e. one-person, two-person, etc). However, a tent's stated sleeping capacity usually does not include much (or any) space for your gear and there’s no sizing standard between tent manufacturers. Some users size up.
  • Livability:
    Will you use the tent as a basecamp or is it an emergency shelter only? To determine if you and your gear will fit, look at the shelter’s dimensions, including floor and vestibule square areas, height and headroom (including at the sides), plus the number and placement of doors, gear lofts, and pockets, to assess personal livability, comfort, and footprint.
  • Weight and Packed Size:
    If you’ll be backpacking, climbing, cycling, or otherwise carrying that shelter, consider its weight, packed size (and your pack it needs to fit in), and its space-to-weight ratio before automatically opting for the bigger tent. Paddlers and car campers have more room to work with, but everyone should consider how the tent and its parts pack up for stowage.
  • Design:
    Tents come in various designs. Freestanding tents can stand alone without stakes or guy lines and can be easily moved or have dirt and other debris shaken out without being disassembled, though they still need to be staked out. Rounded, geodesic domes are stable and able to withstand heavy snow loads and wind. Tunnel tents are narrow and rectangular, and large family cabin tents are best for warm-weather campground outings.
  • Other features and specs to consider include single versus double-wall, ease of setup, stability, weather resistance, ventilation, , and any noteworthy features.
  • Read more in our guide to tents.