Tents and Shelters

Ready for a night out? Whether you’re an ultralight alpinist, family of backpackers, devoted hanger, or comfort camper, you'll find the best tents, tarps, and hammocks for your outdoor overnights right here.

Check out our top picks below—including price comparisons—to shelter you in any terrain, trip, or season: winter mountaineering, three-season thru-hiking, warm weather car camping, hammock hanging, alpine bivys, tarps, and emergency shelter.

Or you can browse our thousands of independent tent and shelter ratings and reviews by product type, brand, or price. Written by real-world hikers, backpackers, alpinists, climbers, and paddlers, Trailspace community reviews will help you select a dependable, field-tested, outdoor abode just right for your next adventure.

Learn more about how to choose a tent/shelter below »

Category

Four-Season
3-4 Season Convertible
Three-Season
Warm Weather
Bivy Sacks
Tarps and Shelters
Hammocks
Bug Nets
Accessories

Brand

other
ABC Tents
Academy Broadway
AceCamp
Adventure 16
Adventure Designs
Alite
Alpine Design
ALPS Mountaineering
Amok

User

Unisex
Men's
Kids'

Price

less than $25
$25 - $49.99
$50 - $99.99
$100 - $199.99
$200 - $299.99
$300 - $399.99
$400 - $499.99
$500 and above

Recent Tent/Shelter Reviews

Eagles Nest Outfitters Atlas Straps

rated 4.5 of 5 stars These straps are great for all types of camping. They allow you to raise and lower your hammock for excellent comfort. I would definitely recommend them. These are the ultimate hammock straps. They allow you to easily fine tune the position of your hammock. They have a decent length that is good for most trees. I bought them after three years of using ENO's  slap straps. One thing that is great is that after a night using slap straps the straps will extend and often leave you touching the ground. Full review

Tarptent Rainbow

rated 4 of 5 stars Lightweight (1 Kg). Great for backpacking in most seasons. Durable for light rain, though allows some condensation (or with dew). A good three-season tent. The additional inner wall (that can be attached manually from the inside while raining!! Awesome!) is very good in preventing getting wet from condensation. Thus saying, during not-so-cold weather there's condensation. Very light, great for single backpacking for long periods of time. Easy and fast assembling. Has enough room for a single backpacker… Full review

Loco Libre Gear Carolina Reaper 30°

rated 4.5 of 5 stars This is a custom down hammock underquilt by Loco Libre, a small cottage manufacturer. All quilts are custom designed and handmade in the U.S. I had this underquilt made custom for my needs. It is a 30° F quilt that is 54" long and 44" wide. I had it filled with 900 fp Downtek goose down and an extra oz. added for a total of 13 ounces of fill and approximately 2.5" of loft. It has draft collars on both foot and head ends and all necessary hardware and adjustable shock cords to easily attach it to… Full review

Sierra Designs Half Moon 3

rated 4.5 of 5 stars For an older model tent, this one still stands strong even now. Tough, reliable, easy to set up, with a reasonable weight; what's not to like? Setup: The tent has a basic cross pole design with a shorter top pole that fits into two grommets. The apex pole clip holds the top cross pole in place with respect to the other poles (see pic). The poles use clips and don't require any sleeve insertion. This cuts down setup time and headaches. They fit into standard brass corner grommets. The footprint… Full review

Eagles Nest Outfitters DoubleNest

rated 4 of 5 stars Easy to use, comfortable hammock. Received as a gift two years ago. In addition I own the Atlas strap system for simple and quick connection. Disclaimer—I have yet to use this as a sleeping option (save for naps). I enjoy taking it while backpacking as restful seating option at camp, but prefer the tent for bug/rain protection. Have not owned or used the meshing or tarp in conjunction. Haven't embraced cowboy camping as of yet. I'm a bigger guy (6'3" 200 lbs), so two people lying inside is a bit… Full review

Hilleberg Nammatj 3 GT

rated 5 of 5 stars Fantastic base camp tent for one or two people. I will not review the tech specs. These are available from Hilleberg. Suffice to say their specs match my observations. Have used this tent three times now. Extremely easy to set up. Three hoops and four pegs, that’s it for initial setup. There are many more pegs to make this tent completely sound. Very roomy and nice high vestibule. Constant height inner tent and vestibule are benefits. I have had no problems with condensation. It is very strong. Full review

Kelty Outfitter Pro 2

rated 5 of 5 stars Two-person bomb shelter. This tent is like a palace. The two doors are epic. Heard the wind howling and the tent never budged. Drug this thing up Mt. Shasta and the weight was obvious. Split between two people though it wasn't even noticed (I carry more weight than that in whiskey alone). Full review

REI Base Camp 4

rated 4 of 5 stars A very strong family/base camp tent with an excellent backpack style carrying bag. Due to privacy walls, the mesh screens are higher up and there is reduced airflow in hot weather. Best in inclement weather or where you might experience wind/rain. The fly is color coded but the footprint does not come with tent. Need two people to install. Best for 2-3 adults or comfortably two with cots. As a long serving (suffering?) Scout leader, I've got tents galore. I own an REI Kingdom 8, Base Camp 4, Half… Full review

Kelty Streamside 4

rated 5 of 5 stars Solid tent. After over 50 uses, I knicknamed it "ole trusty". I bought this tent in 2001. I've used it several times per year for leisure camping to spike camping for hunting. Solid tent. I'm going to replace the poles and keep using this bad boy until it disintegrates! Full review

Top-Rated Tents and Shelters

Sort by: name | rating | price | availability | recently reviewed

user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Alpine Mountain Gear Solo Plus Alaskan Three-Season Tent
$150 MSRP
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (1)
Atak Outdoor Lighted Tent Stakes Stake
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
Black Polyethylene Plastic Sheeting Tarp Tarp/Shelter
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
BugBaffler Insect Protective Headnet Bug Net
$9 MSRP
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Clam Quick-Set Escape Warm Weather Tent
$300 MSRP
 
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Go Roam Hammock Hammock
user rating: 4 of 5 (2)
Jeep 3-Room Screen Combo Dome Tent 3-4 Season Convertible Tent
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Kamp-Rite Oversize Tent Cot Three-Season Tent
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
KidCo PeaPod
$80 MSRP
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (1)
Miltec by Sturm One-Man Recon Tent Three-Season Tent
user rating: 1.5 of 5 (2)
Peaktop 8 Man Big Tunnel Spider Family Group Camping Tent
user rating: 3 of 5 (1)
ProForce Jungle Hammock with Mosquito Net Hammock
$59 MSRP
 
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (1)
Rhino G-4 Grand Geodesic Tent Four-Season Tent
 
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Standing Room 100 Hanging Tent Three-Season Tent
user rating: 1 of 5 (1)
TAS Auscam Bivvy Bag Bivy Sack
$250 MSRP
Topist Mosquito Net Hammock Hammock
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Vivere Parachute Nylon Hammock Hammock
 
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
ABC Tents Type 1 Four-Season Tent
discontinued
 
user rating: 3 of 5 (2)
Academy Broadway 6-1/2-Ft. x 7-Ft. 3-Person Dome Tent Three-Season Tent
 
user rating: 0.5 of 5 (1)
Academy Broadway tent Four-Season Tent
 
AceCamp Multi-Layer Reflective Tent Tarp/Shelter
 
user rating: 4 of 5 (2)
Adventure 16 Bug Bivy Bivy Sack
 
user rating: 4 of 5 (2)
Adventure Designs Diamondback Four-Season Tent
Alite Meadow Mat Under Quilt
$39
Alite Sierra Shack Three-Season Tent
$104
 
user rating: 0 of 5 (1)
Alpine Design hammock
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (6)
Alpine Design Hiker Biker Three-Season Tent
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Alpine Design Hiker Biker II
 
user rating: 2 of 5 (2)
Alpine Design Horizon Dome 9 Tent
user rating: 0.5 of 5 (3)
Alpine Design Mesa 8 Tent with Screen Porch Three-Season Tent
ALPS Mountaineering 2-Person Floor Saver Footprint
$20 - $21
ALPS Mountaineering 3-Person Floor Saver Footprint
$27 - $29
ALPS Mountaineering 4-Person Floor Saver Footprint
$45
ALPS Mountaineering 5-Person Floor Saver Footprint
$35
ALPS Mountaineering 6-Person Floor Saver Footprint
$40 - $44
ALPS Mountaineering Aries 2 Three-Season Tent
$125
ALPS Mountaineering Aries 2 Floor Saver Footprint
$23
ALPS Mountaineering Aries 3 Three-Season Tent
$140
ALPS Mountaineering Aries 3 Floor Saver Footprint
$30 - $36
ALPS Mountaineering Camp Creek Three-Season Tent
$199 - $249
 
ALPS Mountaineering Camp Creek Two-Room
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
ALPS Mountaineering Chaos 2 Three-Season Tent
$166 - $259
ALPS Mountaineering Chaos 2 Floor Saver Footprint
$21 - $27
user rating: 4 of 5 (8)
ALPS Mountaineering Chaos 3 Three-Season Tent
$150 - $289
ALPS Mountaineering Chaos 3 Floor Saver Footprint
$24 - $29
 
user rating: 3 of 5 (2)
ALPS Mountaineering Comet 1.5 Three-Season Tent
discontinued
 
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
ALPS Mountaineering Edge 2 Three-Season Tent
discontinued
 
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (1)
ALPS Mountaineering Edge 4 Three-Season Tent
discontinued
ALPS Mountaineering Edge 6 Three-Season Tent
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
ALPS Mountaineering Extreme 2 Three-Season Tent
$125
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What’s the “best” tent or shelter for you? Consider your personal outdoor needs, preferences, and budget:

  • Conditions:
    First, and most important, in what seasons, conditions, and terrain will you use your tent, tarp, or hammock? Choose a shelter that can handle the conditions you expect to encounter (rain, snow, wind, heat, humidity, biting insects, an energetic scout troop), but don’t buy more tent than you truly need, and don’t expect one tent to do it all.
  • Capacity:
    Tents are typically classified by sleeping capacity (i.e. one-person, two-person, etc). However, a tent's stated sleeping capacity usually does not include much (or any) space for your gear and there’s no sizing standard between tent manufacturers. Some users size up.
  • Livability:
    Will you use the tent as a basecamp or is it an emergency shelter only? To determine if you and your gear will fit, look at the shelter’s dimensions, including floor and vestibule square areas, height and headroom (including at the sides), plus the number and placement of doors, gear lofts, and pockets, to assess personal livability, comfort, and footprint.
  • Weight and Packed Size:
    If you’ll be backpacking, climbing, cycling, or otherwise carrying that shelter, consider its weight, packed size (and your pack it needs to fit in), and its space-to-weight ratio before automatically opting for the bigger tent. Paddlers and car campers have more room to work with, but everyone should consider how the tent and its parts pack up for stowage.
  • Design:
    Tents come in various designs. Freestanding tents can stand alone without stakes or guy lines and can be easily moved or have dirt and other debris shaken out without being disassembled, though they still need to be staked out. Rounded, geodesic domes are stable and able to withstand heavy snow loads and wind. Tunnel tents are narrow and rectangular, and large family cabin tents are best for warm-weather campground outings.
  • Other features and specs to consider include single versus double-wall, ease of setup, stability, weather resistance, ventilation, , and any noteworthy features.
  • Read more in our guide to tents.