Tents and Shelters

Ready for a night out? Whether you’re an ultralight alpinist, family of backpackers, devoted hanger, or comfort camper, you'll find the best tents, tarps, and hammocks for your outdoor overnights right here.

Check out our top picks below—including price comparisons—to shelter you in any terrain, trip, or season: winter mountaineering, three-season thru-hiking, warm weather car camping, hammock hanging, alpine bivys, tarps, and emergency shelter.

Or you can browse our thousands of independent tent and shelter ratings and reviews by product type, brand, or price. Written by real-world hikers, backpackers, alpinists, climbers, and paddlers, Trailspace community reviews will help you select a dependable, field-tested, outdoor abode just right for your next adventure.

Learn more about how to choose a tent/shelter below »

Categories

Four-Season
3-4 Season Convertible
Three-Season
Warm Weather
Bivy Sacks
Tarps and Shelters
Hammocks
Accessories

Brands

other
ABC Tents
Academy Broadway
Adventure 16
Adventure Designs
Alite
Alpine Design
ALPS Mountaineering
Amok
Apache

Genders

Unisex
Men's
Kids'

Price

less than $25
$25 - $49.99
$50 - $99.99
$100 - $199.99
$200 - $299.99
$300 - $399.99
$400 - $499.99
$500 and above

Recent Tent/Shelter Reviews

UnderGround Quilts Winter Dream tarp

rated 5 of 5 stars The Winter Dream offers superior protection from the elements for hammock campers. Closing the doors cuts the wind and creates a cozy, dry, happy space from which one may enjoy sitting out the storm. UnderGround Quilts Outdoor Equipment is one of my favorite cottage industry suppliers.  I have two hammock under quilts, one Renegade top quilt, and five different tarps from them.  All feature top notch quality in every stitch.This review is intended to be about the "Winter Dream" tarp.  It should… Full review

The North Face Stormbreak 1

rated 4 of 5 stars The Stormbreak 1 tent is a good value if you are looking to reduce your pack weight at a reasonable price. It is constructed using quality materials and will keep you dry. The Northface Stormbreak 1 tent is a good quality tent and is an excellent value for the price. The tent is very easy to set up using the two light weight aluminum poles. It is free standing and really only needs to be staked out to pull the rain fly away from the tent body and to keep it from blowing away. The tent poles put… Full review

Hilleberg Anjan 2 GT

rated 4.5 of 5 stars A tent with a very large porch, considering it only weighs 2.1 kg. great for hikers and cyclists alike! I got this tent after using a terra nova voyager Superlite on a two week trek in Scotland, the porch was to small and I was fedup of climbing over the rucksacks for a pee! Amazing space in the porch! I used this tent in South Wales for four nights and it rained and rained, condensation was minimal. (I used tyvek as ground sheet which may of helped) It kept use dry and helped to keep use warm during… Full review

Mountainsmith Mountain Shelter LT

rated 4 of 5 stars The Mountain Shelter LT is simple, pretty easy to set up, and great for non-winter backpacking. It is a single-walled, floorless shelter, so it is prone to condensation. It has been very durable and dependable for me in wind and rain in the Colorado Rockies. It isn't the lightest option, but it is an amazing value. Setup: Like most floorless shelters, this one takes some practice to get where it looks nice and taut. Trekking poles are required for setup. I really like that the shelter has a label… Full review

Hyperlite Mountain Gear UltaMid 4-Person

rated 5 of 5 stars In the category of floorless tents, the Ultamid 4 is the best product I've owned (I've owned four other pyramid- styled tents) and used several others. Because of the Cuben-fiber the Ultamid is also the lightest and the strongest of the lot (mine weighs 22.5 ounces with the staking cords but not the stakes). This tent will sleep four people (tight), but is light enough to use as a palatial solo tent. I've owned four pyramid-styled tents since the early 1980s including the original Chouinard Pyramid,… Full review

Black Diamond Skylight

rated 0.5 of 5 stars Retiring it after three years. Can't keep out rain. Leaks like a sieve in steady rain. Condensation builds up in bad weather when you close the vestibule even with recommended venting. Lightweight, but don't trust it in inclement weather. I have used this tent for three years. Purchased from BD in 2013. Also have an Eldorado and Fitzroy. Those are keepers. The Skylight is unreliable. It will not handle anything but balmy weather. It will not keep out a steady rain. Finally had to put a tarp over… Full review

Marmot Traillight 2P

rated 4 of 5 stars A decent solo tent for the summer sub-alpine. I bought this as a solo summer mountain tent and am happy with what I have. It is perfect for one person. If two men are sharing this tent then they are probably sharing more than a tent. I have not had it in any summer snow conditions (YET), but if you're able to tie it down it should handle a couple of inches, which makes the 5 lb total travel weight reasonable.  I've had it for a few years on 6 or 7 backcountry trips. Everything has held up well. Full review

REI Hobitat 4

rated 5 of 5 stars A tent big enough to stand in, or lounge inside with several friends during stormy weather. Great for most types of weather, even light snow. Great all around, car camping tent. Full review

Big Agnes Rattlesnake SL1 mtnGLO

rated 5 of 5 stars Light and spacious for a 1P tent. I've been searching for a 1P tent that balances space with weight. This is the one. Fairly taut tent without guys Side entry facilitates the ol' in and out. Setup: Really easy setup. There's a solo collapsible pole system and one cross pole for the top. Just insert the poles into the 4 corners, clip the tent to the poles, and fasten the top cross pole, Done. No sleeves, no problem. The fly has 4 corner clips that make it very simple. Additionally, the fly fastens… Full review

Top-Rated Tents and Shelters

Sort by: name | rating | price | availability | recently reviewed

user rating: 3.5 of 5 (1)
Atak Outdoor Lighted Tent Stakes Stake
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
Black Polyethylene Plastic Sheeting Tarp Tarp/Shelter
user rating: 4 of 5 (2)
Jeep 3-Room Screen Combo Dome Tent 3-4 Season Convertible Tent
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Kamp-Rite Oversize Tent Cot Three-Season Tent
 
user rating: 2.5 of 5 (1)
Peaktop 8 Man Big Tunnel Spider Family Group Camping Tent
user rating: 3 of 5 (1)
ProForce Jungle Hammock with Mosquito Net Hammock
$59 MSRP
 
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (1)
Rhino G-4 Grand Geodesic Tent Four-Season Tent
 
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Standing Room 100 Hanging Tent Three-Season Tent
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Vivere Parachute Nylon Hammock Hammock
 
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
ABC Tents Type 1 Four-Season Tent
discontinued
 
user rating: 3 of 5 (2)
Academy Broadway 6-1/2-Ft. x 7-Ft. 3-Person Dome Tent Three-Season Tent
 
user rating: 0.5 of 5 (1)
Academy Broadway tent Four-Season Tent
 
user rating: 4 of 5 (2)
Adventure 16 Bug Bivy Bivy Sack
 
user rating: 4 of 5 (2)
Adventure Designs Diamondback Four-Season Tent
Alite Murphy 2 Three-Season Tent
$219
 
user rating: 0 of 5 (1)
Alpine Design hammock
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (6)
Alpine Design Hiker Biker Three-Season Tent
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Alpine Design Hiker Biker II
 
user rating: 2 of 5 (2)
Alpine Design Horizon Dome 9 Tent
user rating: 0.5 of 5 (3)
Alpine Design Mesa 8 Tent with Screen Porch Three-Season Tent
ALPS Mountaineering 2-Person Floor Saver Footprint
$19
ALPS Mountaineering 3-Person Floor Saver Footprint
$26
ALPS Mountaineering 4-Person Floor Saver Footprint
$29
ALPS Mountaineering 6-Person Floor Saver Footprint
$43
ALPS Mountaineering Aries 2 Three-Season Tent
$168
 
ALPS Mountaineering Aries 2 Floor Saver Footprint
$19
ALPS Mountaineering Aries 3 Three-Season Tent
$189
 
ALPS Mountaineering Aries 3 Floor Saver Footprint
$28
 
ALPS Mountaineering Camp Creek Two-Room
$227
ALPS Mountaineering Cedar Ridge Rimrock 8 Two Room Three-Season Tent
$230
ALPS Mountaineering Chaos 2 Three-Season Tent
$167 - $174
ALPS Mountaineering Chaos 2 Floor Saver Footprint
$19 - $20
user rating: 4 of 5 (7)
ALPS Mountaineering Chaos 3 Three-Season Tent
$196
ALPS Mountaineering Chaos 3 Floor Saver Footprint
$28
 
user rating: 3 of 5 (2)
ALPS Mountaineering Comet 1.5 Three-Season Tent
discontinued
ALPS Mountaineering Edge 1 Three-Season Tent
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
ALPS Mountaineering Edge 2 Three-Season Tent
discontinued
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (1)
ALPS Mountaineering Edge 4 Three-Season Tent
$153
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
ALPS Mountaineering Extreme 2 Three-Season Tent
$175
 
ALPS Mountaineering Extreme 2 Floor Saver Footprint
$19
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
ALPS Mountaineering Extreme 3 Three-Season Tent
$210
ALPS Mountaineering Extreme 3 Footprint Footprint
$28
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
ALPS Mountaineering Extreme 3 Outfitter Three-Season Tent
$320 MSRP
 
ALPS Mountaineering Galaxy 2 Three-Season Tent
$160
 
user rating: 4 of 5 (2)
ALPS Mountaineering Glacier 2 3-4 Season Convertible Tent
discontinued
ALPS Mountaineering Gradient 2 Three-Season Tent
$161
ALPS Mountaineering Gradient 2 Floor Saver Footprint
$19
ALPS Mountaineering Gradient 3 Three-Season Tent
$182
 
ALPS Mountaineering Gradient 3 Floor Saver Footprint
$28
ALPS Mountaineering Helix 3 Tent Three-Season Tent
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What’s the “best” tent or shelter for you? Consider your personal outdoor needs, preferences, and budget:

  • Conditions:
    First, and most important, in what seasons, conditions, and terrain will you use your tent, tarp, or hammock? Choose a shelter that can handle the conditions you expect to encounter (rain, snow, wind, heat, humidity, biting insects, an energetic scout troop), but don’t buy more tent than you truly need, and don’t expect one tent to do it all.
  • Capacity:
    Tents are typically classified by sleeping capacity (i.e. one-person, two-person, etc). However, a tent's stated sleeping capacity usually does not include much (or any) space for your gear and there’s no sizing standard between tent manufacturers. Some users size up.
  • Livability:
    Will you use the tent as a basecamp or is it an emergency shelter only? To determine if you and your gear will fit, look at the shelter’s dimensions, including floor and vestibule square areas, height and headroom (including at the sides), plus the number and placement of doors, gear lofts, and pockets, to assess personal livability, comfort, and footprint.
  • Weight and Packed Size:
    If you’ll be backpacking, climbing, cycling, or otherwise carrying that shelter, consider its weight, packed size (and your pack it needs to fit in), and its space-to-weight ratio before automatically opting for the bigger tent. Paddlers and car campers have more room to work with, but everyone should consider how the tent and its parts pack up for stowage.
  • Design:
    Tents come in various designs. Freestanding tents can stand alone without stakes or guy lines and can be easily moved or have dirt and other debris shaken out without being disassembled, though they still need to be staked out. Rounded, geodesic domes are stable and able to withstand heavy snow loads and wind. Tunnel tents are narrow and rectangular, and large family cabin tents are best for warm-weather campground outings.
  • Other features and specs to consider include single versus double-wall, ease of setup, stability, weather resistance, ventilation, , and any noteworthy features.
  • Read more in our guide to tents.