Tents and Shelters

Ready for a night out? Whether you’re an ultralight alpinist, family of backpackers, devoted hanger, or comfort camper, you'll find the best tents, tarps, and hammocks for your outdoor overnights right here.

Check out our top picks below—including price comparisons—to shelter you in any terrain, trip, or season: winter mountaineering, three-season thru-hiking, warm weather car camping, hammock hanging, alpine bivys, tarps, and emergency shelter.

Or you can browse our thousands of independent tent and shelter ratings and reviews by product type, brand, or price. Written by real-world hikers, backpackers, alpinists, climbers, and paddlers, Trailspace community reviews will help you select a dependable, field-tested, outdoor abode just right for your next adventure.

Learn more about how to choose a tent/shelter below »

Categories

Four-Season
3-4 Season Convertible
Three-Season
Warm Weather
Bivy Sacks
Tarps and Shelters
Hammocks
Accessories

Brands

other
ABC Tents
Academy Broadway
Adventure 16
Adventure Designs
Alpine Design
ALPS Mountaineering
Apache
Appy Trails
Artiach

Price

less than $25
$25 - $49.99
$50 - $99.99
$100 - $199.99
$200 - $299.99
$300 - $399.99
$400 - $499.99
$500 and above

Recent Tent/Shelter Reviews

VauDe Campo XT 5

rated 4 of 5 stars The Campo XT5 seems to be a quality tent that should last for a good number of years. I just received my Campo XT5 from Campsaver after much thought. I have camped for 50 years and very much enjoy it. My wife does not because of the inconveniences my smaller mountaineering tents pose for her.  Basically if I am going to get her to join me on outings I needed a bigger tent. I also considered options from Big Agnes, Kelty, Marmot, REI, and Redvers. For comparison, my other tents include an original… Full review

Big Agnes Burn Ridge Outfitter 2

rated 4.5 of 5 stars A great mid-weight, affordable backpacking tent. I can set up the tent in 2 minutes after a few setup experiences. I love the fact that it is free-standing and rarely use the pegs (this also allows me to hold the upper pole and shake out the tent before packing). The quick-clips are far superior to sleeved poles. By exchanging the included pegs with titanium, I shed several ounces. I also use a Mylar footprint (emergency poncho) which costs $1 each and is recyclable at the end of the trip. It is… Full review

Cabela's Alaskan Guide 8-Man

rated 2.5 of 5 stars Good for standing up against strong wind and not getting wet from hard rains. Bad for being warm. I have camped in this 8-person guide tent numerous times. As far as being sturdy in a strong wind or being waterproof this tent cannot be beat. However for cold weather camping it falls a bit short. This is the first time i have used it in very cold weather meaning no snow with wind, rain and temps in the teens. I am not sure how you can stay warm in a tent that has three open roof vents that cannot… Full review

Big Agnes Fly Creek UL1

rated 4.5 of 5 stars Some help with your decision whether to purchase the UL1. And it is freestanding! First start with the specs: Fly 9 oz; Inner 10.2 oz; Poles 6.9 oz; Tent Stuff sack 0.56 oz; Pole stuff sack 0.4 oz; Stake stuff sack 0.1 oz;  Replaced 11 original stakes 4.4 oz with 8 titanium stakes 0.56 oz (cost $10); Replaced 3.7 oz groundsheet (which was free with purchase) with 1 oz mylar (Cost $1). Total tent price after 21% off sale $260. Total weight 1 lb 12.7oz.  The Platinum is a lighter option which weighs… Full review

Sierra Madre Research Pares

rated 5 of 5 stars A really comfortable hammock for tall people, the quality from Sierra Madre is great and the Pares hammock is built with durability in mind. The fabric is different from any other hammock I've tried, and at 10.75' in length and 6.5' in width it really has a great diagonal lay! The unique stuff sack really compresses the Pares hammock down nicely, almost to a softball size. Product: Pares Hammock from Sierra Madre Research or SMr  Color: Green Chives I am 6' 2" at approximately 195lbs Setup: Because… Full review

Eureka! Spitfire 1

rated 5 of 5 stars The best tent I have ever owned, when times used, ease of setup, pack-ability and cost are factored in. I have nicer two-person tents, but for backpacking this my favorite. I have used my Spitfire for years, and it still performs well. Not freestanding but very easy to set up. Still waterproof, and well ventilated. Will want to replace the Eureka stakes with a more sturdy stake, I added the Kelty No-Bendium. I am 6'1", and I fit nicely in this tent. Recently went hiking in Harriman State Park,… Full review

ALPS Mountaineering Zephyr 2.0

rated 4 of 5 stars A great tent for the price. Packs down smaller than my Sierra Designs Electron 2. Slightly narrower near foot, and a little less vestibule space. I bought with the deal flyer discount from Sierra Trading Post. A great low cost tent. Used it for the first time beach camping on Fire Island. A freestanding tent is necessary when pitching on sand. You'll also need sand/snow stakes. I used MSR stakes I got at REI. Tent performed great.  Full review

Walrus Skyline

rated 5 of 5 stars A little heavy, but man what a tent. It's been up in blizzards no one should be in. I've used it for over twenty years and maybe thirty but I now need a pole section replaced. I found this site while looking for parts. I don't know when or how the sleeve of the pole split. I went out with it, found it broken, and splinted it to finish my camp trip. It is pretty old and had been through three blizzards, one with winds in excess of ninety mph, and as many as fifty other trips. The last use before… Full review

Kelty Noah's Tarp 12

rated 4 of 5 stars The Kelty Noah 12 is a huge tarp perfect for year round use, if you are not worried about weight. It can be set up in many different configurations and has plenty of tie-out points. I bought this Kelty Noah 12 used for use over my hammock when backpacking. It provides more than enough cover for my hammock and gear to be kept out of the elements. I've even used it to cover my hammock and daughters 1-person tent while out camping and it provided plenty of coverage. I mostly use this on a diagonal… Full review

Top-Rated Tents and Shelters

Sort by: name | rating | price | availability | recently reviewed

Amok Draumr
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Amok Draumr Hammock
Black Polyethylene Plastic Sheeting Tarp
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
Black Polyethylene Plastic Sheeting Tarp Tarp/Shelter
 
user rating: 2.5 of 5 (1)
Peaktop 8 Man Big Tunnel Spider Family Group Camping Tent
ProForce Jungle Hammock with Mosquito Net
user rating: 3 of 5 (1)
ProForce Jungle Hammock with Mosquito Net Hammock
$59 MSRP
 
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (1)
Rhino G-4 Grand Geodesic Tent Four-Season Tent
 
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Standing Room 100 Hanging Tent Three-Season Tent
Vivere Parachute Nylon Hammock
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Vivere Parachute Nylon Hammock Hammock
 
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
ABC Tents Type 1 Four-Season Tent
discontinued
 
user rating: 3 of 5 (2)
Academy Broadway 6-1/2-Ft. x 7-Ft. 3-Person Dome Tent Three-Season Tent
 
user rating: 0.5 of 5 (1)
Academy Broadway tent Four-Season Tent
Adventure 16 Bug Bivy
user rating: 4 of 5 (2)
Adventure 16 Bug Bivy Bivy Sack
$55
 
user rating: 4 of 5 (2)
Adventure Designs Diamondback Four-Season Tent
 
user rating: 0 of 5 (1)
Alpine Design hammock
Alpine Design Hiker Biker
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (5)
Alpine Design Hiker Biker Three-Season Tent
Alpine Design Hiker Biker II
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Alpine Design Hiker Biker II
 
user rating: 2 of 5 (2)
Alpine Design Horizon Dome 9 Tent
 
user rating: 0.5 of 5 (1)
Alpine Design Mesa 8 Tent with Screen Porch Three-Season Tent
ALPS Mountaineering 2-Person Floor Saver
ALPS Mountaineering 2-Person Floor Saver Footprint
$19
ALPS Mountaineering 4-Person Floor Saver
ALPS Mountaineering 4-Person Floor Saver Footprint
$45 MSRP
ALPS Mountaineering 5-Person Floor Saver
ALPS Mountaineering 5-Person Floor Saver Footprint
ALPS Mountaineering 6-Person Floor Saver
ALPS Mountaineering 6-Person Floor Saver Footprint
$60 MSRP
ALPS Mountaineering Aries 2
ALPS Mountaineering Aries 2 Three-Season Tent
$156 - $162
 
ALPS Mountaineering Aries 2 Floor Saver Footprint
$19
ALPS Mountaineering Aries 3
ALPS Mountaineering Aries 3 Three-Season Tent
$135 - $195
 
ALPS Mountaineering Aries 3 Floor Saver Footprint
$26
ALPS Mountaineering Aztec 3
ALPS Mountaineering Aztec 3 Three-Season Tent
ALPS Mountaineering Aztec 4
ALPS Mountaineering Aztec 4 Three-Season Tent
ALPS Mountaineering Chaos 2
ALPS Mountaineering Chaos 2 Three-Season Tent
$150 - $259
ALPS Mountaineering Chaos 2 Floor Saver
ALPS Mountaineering Chaos 2 Floor Saver Footprint
$19
ALPS Mountaineering Chaos 3
user rating: 4 of 5 (5)
ALPS Mountaineering Chaos 3 Three-Season Tent
$182 - $289
ALPS Mountaineering Chaos 3 Floor Saver
ALPS Mountaineering Chaos 3 Floor Saver Footprint
$28
ALPS Mountaineering Comet 1.5
user rating: 3 of 5 (2)
ALPS Mountaineering Comet 1.5 Three-Season Tent
discontinued
ALPS Mountaineering Edge 1
ALPS Mountaineering Edge 1 Three-Season Tent
ALPS Mountaineering Edge 2
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
ALPS Mountaineering Edge 2 Three-Season Tent
discontinued
ALPS Mountaineering Edge 4
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (1)
ALPS Mountaineering Edge 4 Three-Season Tent
discontinued
ALPS Mountaineering Extreme 2
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
ALPS Mountaineering Extreme 2 Three-Season Tent
$162 - $174
ALPS Mountaineering Extreme 3
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
ALPS Mountaineering Extreme 3 Three-Season Tent
$195
ALPS Mountaineering Extreme 3 Footprint
ALPS Mountaineering Extreme 3 Footprint Footprint
$43 MSRP
ALPS Mountaineering Extreme 3 Outfitter
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
ALPS Mountaineering Extreme 3 Outfitter Three-Season Tent
$320 MSRP
 
user rating: 4 of 5 (2)
ALPS Mountaineering Glacier 2 3-4 Season Convertible Tent
discontinued
ALPS Mountaineering Helix 3 Floor Saver
ALPS Mountaineering Helix 3 Floor Saver Footprint
ALPS Mountaineering Helix 3 Tent
ALPS Mountaineering Helix 3 Tent Three-Season Tent
ALPS Mountaineering Jagged Peak 2
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
ALPS Mountaineering Jagged Peak 2 Four-Season Tent
ALPS Mountaineering Jagged Peak 3
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
ALPS Mountaineering Jagged Peak 3 Four-Season Tent
ALPS Mountaineering Lynx 1
ALPS Mountaineering Lynx 1 Three-Season Tent
ALPS Mountaineering Lynx 2 AL
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
ALPS Mountaineering Lynx 2 AL Three-Season Tent
$120
ALPS Mountaineering Lynx 4 AL
ALPS Mountaineering Lynx 4 AL Three-Season Tent
$250 MSRP
ALPS Mountaineering Meramac 2
ALPS Mountaineering Meramac 2 Three-Season Tent
$70
ALPS Mountaineering Meramac 3
ALPS Mountaineering Meramac 3 Three-Season Tent
$370 MSRP
ALPS Mountaineering Meramac 4
ALPS Mountaineering Meramac 4 Three-Season Tent
$190 MSRP
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What’s the “best” tent or shelter for you? Consider your personal outdoor needs, preferences, and budget:

  • Conditions:
    First, and most important, in what seasons, conditions, and terrain will you use your tent, tarp, or hammock? Choose a shelter that can handle the conditions you expect to encounter (rain, snow, wind, heat, humidity, biting insects, an energetic scout troop), but don’t buy more tent than you truly need, and don’t expect one tent to do it all.
  • Capacity:
    Tents are typically classified by sleeping capacity (i.e. one-person, two-person, etc). However, a tent's stated sleeping capacity usually does not include much (or any) space for your gear and there’s no sizing standard between tent manufacturers. Some users size up.
  • Livability:
    Will you use the tent as a basecamp or is it an emergency shelter only? To determine if you and your gear will fit, look at the shelter’s dimensions, including floor and vestibule square areas, height and headroom (including at the sides), plus the number and placement of doors, gear lofts, and pockets, to assess personal livability, comfort, and footprint.
  • Weight and Packed Size:
    If you’ll be backpacking, climbing, cycling, or otherwise carrying that shelter, consider its weight, packed size (and your pack it needs to fit in), and its space-to-weight ratio before automatically opting for the bigger tent. Paddlers and car campers have more room to work with, but everyone should consider how the tent and its parts pack up for stowage.
  • Design:
    Tents come in various designs. Freestanding tents can stand alone without stakes or guy lines and can be easily moved or have dirt and other debris shaken out without being disassembled, though they still need to be staked out. Rounded, geodesic domes are stable and able to withstand heavy snow loads and wind. Tunnel tents are narrow and rectangular, and large family cabin tents are best for warm-weather campground outings.
  • Other features and specs to consider include single versus double-wall, ease of setup, stability, weather resistance, ventilation, , and any noteworthy features.
  • Read more in our guide to tents.