Tents and Shelters

Ready for a night out? Whether you’re an ultralight alpinist, family of backpackers, devoted hanger, or comfort camper, you'll find the best tents, tarps, and hammocks for your outdoor overnights right here.

Check out our top picks below—including price comparisons—to shelter you in any terrain, trip, or season: winter mountaineering, three-season thru-hiking, warm weather car camping, hammock hanging, alpine bivys, tarps, and emergency shelter.

Or you can browse our thousands of independent tent and shelter ratings and reviews by product type, brand, or price. Written by real-world hikers, backpackers, alpinists, climbers, and paddlers, Trailspace community reviews will help you select a dependable, field-tested, outdoor abode just right for your next adventure.

Learn more about how to choose a tent/shelter below »

Categories

Four-Season
3-4 Season Convertible
Three-Season
Warm Weather
Bivy Sacks
Tarps and Shelters
Hammocks
Accessories

Brands

other
ABC Tents
Academy Broadway
Adventure 16
Adventure Designs
Alite
Alpine Design
ALPS Mountaineering
Apache
Appy Trails

Genders

Unisex
Men's
Kids'

Price

less than $25
$25 - $49.99
$50 - $99.99
$100 - $199.99
$200 - $299.99
$300 - $399.99
$400 - $499.99
$500 and above

Recent Tent/Shelter Reviews

Walrus Arch Rival XV

rated 5 of 5 stars Excellent tent Compact when packed, very light weight at only 1.8Kg and excellent quality. I have had mine since 1999 and has stood the test of time! Because of the size and weight it is ideal for hiking, cycling and mountain expedition. Full review

Hilleberg Saivo

rated 5 of 5 stars It's worth every dime you spend. It's sturdy, like bomb shelter I did a lot of research , as a matter of fact a couple of months or more. I Bought a couple of tents and returned them. didnt like the set up of tent then rain fly thing,  somehow it just didn't get it. Get caught in a storm, set up the outer tent ,then crawl in and set up the inter while it was raining, some tents don't even give you that option.  Sorry that's not for me. Spent $400 / $500 just didn't feel I was getting my monies… Full review

Moss Tents Stardome II

rated 5 of 5 stars Classic bomb-proof mountain tent The Moss Star Dome II is a classic tent, but not seen in the mountains too often these days since Moss went out of business around the year 2000. You'd think it would be obsolete at this point, but it is a very practical design, roomy enough for two, long enough to accommodate 6' 4" adults, and with a roomy hooped vestibule that makes it very livable. I've used this tent at altitude in a variety of weather conditions, in severe wind and heavy precipitation, and it… Full review

ALPS Mountaineering Meramac 2

rated 4 of 5 stars For the price, this two-person tent is a good value. It is easy to set up, relatively lightweight and spacious enough for two people with some gear. I would buy it again. I bought this tent early this year and have only had a chance to use it this summer. For the money that I spent, I really like this tent. It is not a true backpacking tent, but it works well for backpacking. I'm not sure if this would be a tent that I would take on extended trips, but for weekend/multiple day trips, it's good. Full review

Hennessy Hammock Expedition Asym Zip

rated 4 of 5 stars I have used the Hennessy since 2010. I have suggested to the manufacturer five relatively easy modifications that would make this very comfortably hammock almost perfect, but none have been implemented. I did have it on a canoe trip one fall in Upper New York. Very strong rainstorm filled the hammock with a gallon of water, and I and sleeping bag were drenched. If the rain is coming straight down, it is fine, but if blowing sideways, you will get wet. BUT there is any easy fix. I also had it for… Full review

REI Taj 3

rated 5 of 5 stars Incredible tent. If you are having problems setting it up, it's operator error. If you think its too small for three, you don't buy a three-person tent for three people — you buy a four-person tent.  Come on.   It's got great ceiling height. It's long for tall people (as I am). It's got more than adequate vestibule space. It allows good air circulation. And it's bullet proof in rain and wind. It's hard to beat for the price. Too bad it was discontinued. Full review

Sierra Designs Flashlight 1

rated 3.5 of 5 stars Lightweight roomy tent with some cool innovations. Not easy to set up and suffers from condensation issues. This was my first backpacking tent. I bought it primarily for its low weight and for the fact that I could use my trekking poles to set it up. I used it on a week long backpacking trip on the PCT in Oregon and came away with mixed feelings about it.  Setup can be easy if you find yourself camping in soft loamy dirt. Like all single wall tents, the Flashlight relies on tension to keep it standing. Full review

Easton Rimrock 1

rated 4.5 of 5 stars Inexpensive well made tent that packs well. Slightly confusing pole setup, but it becomes easier with practice. I bought this tent on clearance from REI for $100. I had previously used single wall tents for backpacking but was tired of struggling with guy lines and interior condensation issues so I decided to go with a free standing tent. When I saw this one on clearance, I decided to give it a try. What I like most about the tent is that it packs small. With a compression sack it's only slightly… Full review

ALPS Mountaineering Chaos 3

rated 5 of 5 stars This tent is the smartest tent out there with mesh walls, factory sealed fly and floor, #8 zippers two vestibules, and a door on each side. I'm back into scouting and this fits my style perfectly as it is extremely light and stands up to the harsh New England weather without failing! I highly recommend this 3-4 person tent to anyone who takes camping to the next level. This tent is super easy to set up even in low/dark light because of the one-pole framing. The fly is full coverage and has roomy… Full review

Top-Rated Tents and Shelters

Sort by: name | rating | price | availability | recently reviewed

user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Amok Draumr Hammock
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (1)
Atak Outdoor Lighted Tent Stakes Stake
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
Black Polyethylene Plastic Sheeting Tarp Tarp/Shelter
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (1)
Jeep 3-Room Screen Combo Dome Tent 3-4 Season Convertible Tent
 
user rating: 2.5 of 5 (1)
Peaktop 8 Man Big Tunnel Spider Family Group Camping Tent
user rating: 3 of 5 (1)
ProForce Jungle Hammock with Mosquito Net Hammock
$59 MSRP
 
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (1)
Rhino G-4 Grand Geodesic Tent Four-Season Tent
 
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Standing Room 100 Hanging Tent Three-Season Tent
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Vivere Parachute Nylon Hammock Hammock
 
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
ABC Tents Type 1 Four-Season Tent
discontinued
 
user rating: 3 of 5 (2)
Academy Broadway 6-1/2-Ft. x 7-Ft. 3-Person Dome Tent Three-Season Tent
 
user rating: 0.5 of 5 (1)
Academy Broadway tent Four-Season Tent
 
user rating: 4 of 5 (2)
Adventure 16 Bug Bivy Bivy Sack
 
user rating: 4 of 5 (2)
Adventure Designs Diamondback Four-Season Tent
Alite Murphy 2 Three-Season Tent
$219
 
user rating: 0 of 5 (1)
Alpine Design hammock
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (5)
Alpine Design Hiker Biker Three-Season Tent
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Alpine Design Hiker Biker II
 
user rating: 2 of 5 (2)
Alpine Design Horizon Dome 9 Tent
user rating: 0.5 of 5 (2)
Alpine Design Mesa 8 Tent with Screen Porch Three-Season Tent
ALPS Mountaineering 2-Person Floor Saver Footprint
$30 MSRP
ALPS Mountaineering 3-Person Floor Saver Footprint
$26
ALPS Mountaineering 4-Person Floor Saver Footprint
$45 MSRP
ALPS Mountaineering 5-Person Floor Saver Footprint
ALPS Mountaineering 6-Person Floor Saver Footprint
$60 MSRP
ALPS Mountaineering Aries 2 Three-Season Tent
 
ALPS Mountaineering Aries 2 Floor Saver Footprint
ALPS Mountaineering Aries 3 Three-Season Tent
 
ALPS Mountaineering Aries 3 Floor Saver Footprint
$28
ALPS Mountaineering Aztec 3 Three-Season Tent
ALPS Mountaineering Aztec 4 Three-Season Tent
ALPS Mountaineering Cedar Ridge Rimrock 8 Two Room Three-Season Tent
$230
ALPS Mountaineering Chaos 2 Three-Season Tent
$250 MSRP
ALPS Mountaineering Chaos 2 Floor Saver Footprint
$19
user rating: 4 of 5 (7)
ALPS Mountaineering Chaos 3 Three-Season Tent
$196
ALPS Mountaineering Chaos 3 Floor Saver Footprint
$43 MSRP
user rating: 3 of 5 (2)
ALPS Mountaineering Comet 1.5 Three-Season Tent
discontinued
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
ALPS Mountaineering Edge 2 Three-Season Tent
discontinued
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (1)
ALPS Mountaineering Edge 4 Three-Season Tent
discontinued
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
ALPS Mountaineering Extreme 2 Three-Season Tent
$175
 
ALPS Mountaineering Extreme 2 Floor Saver Footprint
$19
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
ALPS Mountaineering Extreme 3 Three-Season Tent
$210
ALPS Mountaineering Extreme 3 Footprint Footprint
$28
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
ALPS Mountaineering Extreme 3 Outfitter Three-Season Tent
$320 MSRP
 
ALPS Mountaineering Galaxy 2 Three-Season Tent
$160
 
user rating: 4 of 5 (2)
ALPS Mountaineering Glacier 2 3-4 Season Convertible Tent
discontinued
ALPS Mountaineering Gradient 2 Three-Season Tent
$161
ALPS Mountaineering Gradient 2 Floor Saver Footprint
$19
ALPS Mountaineering Gradient 3 Three-Season Tent
$182
 
ALPS Mountaineering Gradient 3 Floor Saver Footprint
$28
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What’s the “best” tent or shelter for you? Consider your personal outdoor needs, preferences, and budget:

  • Conditions:
    First, and most important, in what seasons, conditions, and terrain will you use your tent, tarp, or hammock? Choose a shelter that can handle the conditions you expect to encounter (rain, snow, wind, heat, humidity, biting insects, an energetic scout troop), but don’t buy more tent than you truly need, and don’t expect one tent to do it all.
  • Capacity:
    Tents are typically classified by sleeping capacity (i.e. one-person, two-person, etc). However, a tent's stated sleeping capacity usually does not include much (or any) space for your gear and there’s no sizing standard between tent manufacturers. Some users size up.
  • Livability:
    Will you use the tent as a basecamp or is it an emergency shelter only? To determine if you and your gear will fit, look at the shelter’s dimensions, including floor and vestibule square areas, height and headroom (including at the sides), plus the number and placement of doors, gear lofts, and pockets, to assess personal livability, comfort, and footprint.
  • Weight and Packed Size:
    If you’ll be backpacking, climbing, cycling, or otherwise carrying that shelter, consider its weight, packed size (and your pack it needs to fit in), and its space-to-weight ratio before automatically opting for the bigger tent. Paddlers and car campers have more room to work with, but everyone should consider how the tent and its parts pack up for stowage.
  • Design:
    Tents come in various designs. Freestanding tents can stand alone without stakes or guy lines and can be easily moved or have dirt and other debris shaken out without being disassembled, though they still need to be staked out. Rounded, geodesic domes are stable and able to withstand heavy snow loads and wind. Tunnel tents are narrow and rectangular, and large family cabin tents are best for warm-weather campground outings.
  • Other features and specs to consider include single versus double-wall, ease of setup, stability, weather resistance, ventilation, , and any noteworthy features.
  • Read more in our guide to tents.