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Celebrate outdoors with Clif Climber pouch wine


Clif Winery's The Climber Pouch.

Fancy a drink to pair with your favorite energy bars on the trail? Husband and wife Clif Bar co-owners Gary Erickson and Kit Crawford have produced such varieties as The Climber Sauvignon Blanc, Gary's Improv Zinfandel, and Kit's Killer Cab through their Clif Family Winery for years.

Now you can bring Clif wine into the backcountry without worrying about broken glass in your pack. The 1.5-liter The Climber Pouch is available with either cabernet sauvignon or chardonnay.

The pouch boasts an 80 percent lower carbon footprint and 90 percent less waste than two glass bottles. Plus, it can be resealed to maintain freshness for up to a month.

To help you decide between the two, here's how Clif describes its Climber Pouch wines:

Cabernet Sauvignon
Our Cabernet Sauvignon is alive with blackberry jam, plum and black currant flavors. With a lush, soft finish and lots of personality, it's a perfect companion for your favorite foods. ($17)

Chardonnay
Our unoaked Chardonnay is filled to the brim with intensely fresh aromas and flavors of grapefruit, melon and crisp apple. The fruit comes through from the palate to a decisive, juicy finish. ($17)

Or you can bring your own vintage with the (ready to be filled) Platypus Platy Preserve.

via Gear Junkie


Filed under: Gear News

Comments

Rocklion
0 reviewer rep
155 forum posts
May 29, 2011 at 7:29 a.m. (EDT)

A 1.5 liter bag???

Just did the math on this. A 1.5 liter bag equals about 51 ounces. 16 ounces equals a pound, so carrying around your fancy wine will mean about 3.2 pounds in your pack.

No thanks.

Plus, on top of it after hiking all day long and pitching camp, the last thing I have on my mind is having a nice glass of wine by the fire. Perhaps next time I should hike in with my smoking jacket and slippers.

I'll leave this up to the bicyclists tooling around Napa Valley to carry.

Callahan
245 reviewer rep
1,469 forum posts
May 29, 2011 at 2:46 p.m. (EDT)

Arhh yes, wine on the outdoors camping trip.

Well, I would have to say I have taken my one "Platypus" wine pouch before and loved it.  I was not hiking in when taking this, I was riding in and therefore the weight issue as mentioned above by the RockLion was not as much of a consideration.  But still I do watch weight and total volume of gear too.  Sometimes a little indulgence has been nice.  No smoking jacket with slippers, but Pipe with Tabacco and even a HipFlask with Jamesons in it has been very nice to relax with at the end of a long exhausting day, beatiful view, good camp food.

I have been using the Playtpus PlatyPreserve Wine Preservation System for a while.  At 0.8oz empty of 0.75L and $9.95, I am not about to change.

Sometimes I will take it Sometimes I won't.

Rick-Pittsburgh
1,633 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts
May 29, 2011 at 5:01 p.m. (EDT)

I have been known to carry a flask of whiskey at times. For the antiseptic purposes of course.

mikemorrow
314 reviewer rep
1,124 forum posts
May 29, 2011 at 6:16 p.m. (EDT)

I'm a beer lover. Been thinking of filling up my Evernew 1.5. 3.2 lbs would not be to bad for me starting a trail. I mean its just going to get lighter.....right? LOL

whomeworry
87 reviewer rep
2,221 forum posts
May 29, 2011 at 9:42 p.m. (EDT)

While one big reason I hike is to get away from it all, one thing I am adamant about bringing along is the “good life.”  That includes whatever alcoholic bev my companions prefer, including wine.  So what it weighs a few pounds, I’d rather lighten my load by shedding a few pounds of body weight, than foregoing some of the most pleasurable opportunities to enjoy a good grape, brew, or distilled spirit. Summit day with a fine cabernet among friends is my idea of a good time.  In fact I tend to bring the better stuff with me on the trail; after all I need to justify that added weight.  Obviously wine is something more appropriate for a weekender, versus a through hike.  That said I have not sampled the cliff vineyard products.  The packaging pitch is all good, but the grapes have to stand on their own for me to bring them along.

Ed

Rocklion
0 reviewer rep
155 forum posts
May 29, 2011 at 9:44 p.m. (EDT)

Don't get me wrong. Not a total stickler on some indulgences once in awhile. Just don't want to carry 3 pounds of it.

I will never be a man to deprive another man of a flask or a good smoke.

Matter of fact, I won't deprive the person of taking the wine either. Just as long as he wants to carry it and doesn't mind me helping lighten his load.

Rocklion
0 reviewer rep
155 forum posts
May 29, 2011 at 9:46 p.m. (EDT)

And with that post I go from full member to senior member. Woohoo! That come with any kind of gift basket or consolation prize?

Rick-Pittsburgh
1,633 reviewer rep
3,962 forum posts
May 30, 2011 at 9:38 a.m. (EDT)

I can find ya a few coupons for some Ozark Trail gear :p

trouthunter
MODERATOR TOP 25 REVIEWER REVIEW CORPS
884 reviewer rep
3,432 forum posts
May 30, 2011 at 9:43 a.m. (EDT)

Rocklion said:

And with that post I go from full member to senior member. Woohoo! That come with any kind of gift basket or consolation prize?

Haha. It comes with the knowledge that you are a member of a very good forum I guess.

Congratulations.

I like a good Merlot with a steak dinner when dinning out, but for backpacking I would have to opt for a smooth whiskey.

I'm not a heavy drinker, but I like sitting with friends on a rock beside a stream or on an overlook, enjoying the evening with a couple shots and some good conversation, for me that is hard to beat.

Good article though, and many people re use the wine bladders for water containers, I have two of them.

Robert Rowe
0 reviewer rep
1,238 forum posts
May 30, 2011 at 10:41 a.m. (EDT)

I might consider this.  

Have never tried this wine.   I, too, enjoy the relaxation aspect of hiking and camping.  

I almost NEVER incorporate deadlines or a rigid schedule for my hiking and backpacking.   Hence; the "relaxation" component.

___________________________________________________________

Everyone ~~  I hope you enjoy your Memorial Day Holiday.

Remember: It is NOT about YOUR activities, such as backyard barbeques, and such.   Remember the fallen, and the freedom we enjoy, for which they paid the ultimate sacrifice.

~ r2 ~

apeman
0 reviewer rep
1,236 forum posts
May 31, 2011 at 3:04 a.m. (EDT)

Sooooooooooo..........

Before I make comment, is this ( "Celebrate outdoors with Clif Climber pouch wine") directive, or a question?  Don't make me drink that wine,  Don't............

Robert Rowe
0 reviewer rep
1,238 forum posts
May 31, 2011 at 6:56 a.m. (EDT)

  A shameless plug / advert ?

Could it be Alicia is a shill ?   Hmmm ....   Need to take another look at the "Disclosure directive".

~r2~

  

Alicia MacLeay (Alicia)
TRAILSPACE STAFF
471 reviewer rep
2,913 forum posts
May 31, 2011 at 7:27 a.m. (EDT)

Robert Rowe said:

  A shameless plug / advert ?

Could it be Alicia is a shill ?   Hmmm ....   Need to take another look at the "Disclosure directive".

~r2~

  

I'm pretty sure Robert was joking, but just in case other readers don't realize that, I'll answer emphatically: No. I neither have nor have ever had a Clif wine of any variety or vintage nor a Climber Pouch. I just though it was interesting and might be interesting to others.

You can't buy space in a Trailspace blog or article. There are some blogs that do so; we do not. Editorial and advertising are separate. Trailspace's editorial policy says we never accept adverts, freebies, or other compensation in exchange for mention in our articles, blogs, or reviews.

If we review a book or piece of gear on Trailspace, we disclose if we have been provided a sample for the testing/review process. Otherwise, we pay our own way. No freebies.

FYI, we also cover this in the Gear Review Rules and Guidelines, which everyone who submits a review is subject to, and in our Editorial Policies. Plus, we have an entire ethics policy for anyone who writes for us and one for anyone who reviews gear for us.

Sorry that was so long, but I thought it was worth mentioning.

Now, back to the original topic...

Robert Rowe
0 reviewer rep
1,238 forum posts
May 31, 2011 at 10:07 a.m. (EDT)

Alicia ~~

YES -- most emphatically; I was making 'light' with my suggestion.   There is no application here for "SMILIES".   Had there been, I would have used one to connote humor.

I am relatively new, here; but, am already a prolific poster.   If you read some of my posts, you will notice I have a wry sense-of-humor ... often self-deprecating  ( rhymes with "defecating" ... and insert virtual "SMILIE" ).

I try to find humor in oft-times mundane subjects.   Far too many folks take things waaaay too seriously.

As a side note, Alicia, I was going to contact you regarding gear tests.   I go through quite a bit of gear; and, I have been at it a long time (since the  1960s, as a young Scout,  as a matter-of-fact).   I am geographically near several prominent outdoor outfitting 'chain stores', as well as a couple factory-outlet stores.   I am a regular customer, and patronizer of their offerings.   I am a "frequent-flyer" ( 'preferred custormer' status, etc.),  and get early or advance opportunities to see the latest gear from the high-endy suppliers, as well as the  latest mainstream offerings just becoming available.

I did manage a couple surf-shops and outdoor apparel stores several years ago.   Therefore, I am familiar with retail marketing strategies.

I feel I can be a worthy contributor here, for gear testing.

If you are interested in having me test gear and products, please "PM" me.   I have questions regarding same.

Regards,

Robert

Alicia MacLeay (Alicia)
TRAILSPACE STAFF
471 reviewer rep
2,913 forum posts
May 31, 2011 at 10:27 a.m. (EDT)

Robert Rowe said:

Alicia ~~

YES -- most emphatically; I was making 'light' with my suggestion.   There is no application here for "SMILIES".   Had there been, I would have used one to connote humor.

Yeah, I figured as much, Robert. No worries. I also figured it was a good opportunity to reiterate our policy for others, because while we and many other publications have policies in place, there are some online publications and blogs that don't.

As for gear testing, here's the info:

Trailspace publishes a limited number of backcountry gear reviews through the Trailspace Gear Review Corps program.

Experienced outdoors people with the interest and ability to extensively field-test backcountry gear for Trailspace on a volunteer basis should send a query to reviewcorps@trailspace.com. Please describe your backcountry expertise and background, areas of personal interest, and any review, testing, or writing experience.

Thanks!

f_klock
100 reviewer rep
762 forum posts
May 31, 2011 at 1:53 p.m. (EDT)

"The pouch boasts an 80 percent lower carbon footprint and 90 percent less waste than two glass bottles. Plus, it can be resealed to maintain freshness for up to a month"

I don't buy it.  And, incidentally, I won't.  Less waste than glass? Are these recyclable? Is there an upcycle buy back program? Lower carbon than glass?  OK, maybe at the onset, but glass bottles can be used over and over - no new manufacturing process.  Resealable? One word: CORK.

gonzan
MODERATOR REVIEW CORPS
658 reviewer rep
2,137 forum posts
May 31, 2011 at 3:47 p.m. (EDT)

whomeworry said:

 Summit day with a fine cabernet among friends is my idea of a good time. 

 When I bring a some libation, it's usually just a small flask of Scotch, but I will occasionally bring wine. I really enjoy a nice deep cab or shiraz around a fire far away from it all. It doesn't get much better, in my opinion. I don't find the carrying an extra couple pounds for that purpose bothersome at all!

f_klock said:

I don't buy it...Less waste than glass? Are these recyclable? Is there an upcycle buy back program? Lower carbon than glass?  OK, maybe at the onset, but glass bottles can be used over and over - no new manufacturing process.  Resealable? One word: CORK.

 This is one example of the kind of hyperbolic "green" branding that really perturbs me. It's just spinning a product to tug on the eco heart strings with maximum effect regardless of the practicality. Glass can be recycled for about a hundres thousand different uses- Pulverize it and it is merely innert sand again. The pouch packaging can likely be recycled, but I seriously doubt the repeated upcycle/recyle potential and long term environmental impact is any lower than glass.  

FromSagetoSnow
TOP 10 REVIEWER REVIEW CORPS
2,679 reviewer rep
1,137 forum posts
May 31, 2011 at 4:18 p.m. (EDT)

I gotta go with Ed on this one, loose three pounds and bring the wine.  I will never fault someone for something they are willing to carry. However I doubt I will be trying this soon. Kinda reminds me of a giant, adult Capri Sun.   

Its food anyway so you could just consider it part of your food and keep the spare 3lbs too.  The light weight pouch is beter than carrying an empty bottle.  Of course those guys in The Gods Must Be Crazy had a lot of uses for a random empty bottle...

iClimb
121 reviewer rep
582 forum posts
May 31, 2011 at 4:48 p.m. (EDT)

I'm all for indulgence and relaxation, but I do plenty of that on my couch. Everyone is entitled to their own fun and their own plans, but my personal thought on this is that when I'm in the backcountry, I want to challenge myself physically and mentally. I push myself hard and do things I thought I couldn't or questioned whether I should (while being safe).

I'll eat like a lion and drink a beer or two to celebrate when I get home, but since I can do that while I relax any time, I tend to avoid it on the trail.

I have no problems with others doing it though, to each his/her own!!

Rocklion
0 reviewer rep
155 forum posts
June 3, 2011 at 7:06 a.m. (EDT)

gonzan said:

 When I bring a some libation, it's usually just a small flask of Scotch, but I will occasionally bring wine. I really enjoy a nice deep cab or shiraz around a fire far away from it all. It doesn't get much better, in my opinion. I don't find the carrying an extra couple pounds for that purpose bothersome at all!

 

I really think you should review this. When you do, give me a call and I'll help with the tasting. ;-)

gonzan
MODERATOR REVIEW CORPS
658 reviewer rep
2,137 forum posts
June 3, 2011 at 8:51 a.m. (EDT)

Haha, I will let you know...maybe ;)

alan
0 reviewer rep
1,073 forum posts
June 8, 2011 at 10:52 p.m. (EDT)

We generally just pour a bottle of wine into a nalene bottle and carry wine that way.  The latest invention on canoe trips is the wine cellar.   Place nalgene wine bottles into a mesh bag, add a big rock, tie rope to bag for retrieval and sink the bag in a deep part of a lake.  We do this when we first get to camp.  By the time we are done setting up and dinner is ready the wine will have cooled down a bit to cellar temperature.

davidtierney
192 reviewer rep
30 forum posts
September 6, 2011 at 2:31 a.m. (EDT)

Hate to contribute to a thread months after it was started, but this one actually convinced me to register on Trailspace.com after a couple of years of lurking. So...

If weight is a concern, and if a person equates wine to a form of booze, then this product is a non-starter because any grain alcohol is much lighter for the same booziness. If you also don't appreciate booze at the end of a long slog, then the weight question is a red herring because you won't carry any no matter what it is.

If, however, you would like to have (and thereby tote) wine (as something more than just a form of booze) in the field, then there are a number of wine-in-a-bag options most of which taste -- to the discerning palate -- like horse urine. If you care about the quality of the wine that you drink, you can pick a choice bottle and transport the contents to some other non-glass container, as carrying glass in the field is a fabulously bad idea; it's heavy, more fragile than a plastic bag, and becomes a danger to yourself and wildlife when broken. One option is to dump it into your nalgene. This means you subject your wine to sloshing and oxygen on initial fill and every subsequent pour. Or you could put it into your PlatyPreserve, which still requires exposure (though minimal) at initial fill, and limits you to one bottle. Although I do not frown upon drinking alone, sharing on a multiday event sort of necessitates more than 750ml. Of course you could bring multiple Platypreserves.

Clif wine is a very attractive alternative. As far as wine in a bag goes, it's one of the best tasting, and at around seven to nine bucks (I found it on the cheap end) per 750ml it reviews at least as good as some wines costing 20-50% more (see here: http://bit.ly/nnIltV, http://bit.ly/qXmXyh, http://bit.ly/oiO8eP, and http://buswk.co/pFx1oF). As far as the delivery method goes, the company's claim stands; it prevents oxygen from getting into the wine except for minimal seepage. As far as the weight goes, for the volume of wine (1500ml) it is the lightest except for containers you'd be carrying anyway (e.g. Nalgene) (as an interesting side note, wine is less dense than water which suggests that you might be better of ditching the water and replacing it with this wine if weight is truly a concern -- and you won't need to worry about purifying!).

As far as the environmental claims goes, actually, plastic bottles actually do involve less carbon dioxide production than glass (see here: http://bit.ly/nNyMLY)...even if every single glass bottle was made from 100% recycled glass (which they aren't) and no plastic was ever recycled (which they are), and these unevenly weighted objects were teleported to the stores which were their final destinations (No, they're not). So, unless you you believe global warming is a myth foisted on the hapless public by evil scientists for the purpose of giving one more excuse for tighter government control, plastic -- perhaps counterintuitively -- seems to make a "greener" case.

That said, I carry whiskey in a flask. So sue me.

Alicia MacLeay (Alicia)
TRAILSPACE STAFF
471 reviewer rep
2,913 forum posts
September 6, 2011 at 11:13 a.m. (EDT)

Welcome to Trailspace membership, David! We're glad to have you.

I'm glad we could draw you in to join and discuss with ruminations on such important topics as wine.

davidtierney
192 reviewer rep
30 forum posts
September 7, 2011 at 8:34 p.m. (EDT)

Thanks, Alicia.  Glad to be here.  I promise I'll try to have contributions more centrally relevant to trailspace in the future.

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