Teva Hurricane XLT

3 reviews
5-star:   1
4-star:   2
3-star:   0
2-star:   0
1-star:   0

Reviews

1

An excellent all around, multi-tasking and able to…

Rating: rated 5 of 5 stars
Source: bought it new
Price Paid: $60-$85

Summary

An excellent all around, multi-tasking and able to get the job done product. Great in a cinch, or a clinch.

Pros

  • Durable construction
  • Lots of tread underfoot
  • Back-country multi-tasker

Cons

  • "Oh my gosh, they weigh so much" (unless you consider they're three shoes in one)

Plant this image in your head—it's day one (or maybe day #13) and after all your planning and spending and weighing and fretting and traveling you're on the trail, but the trail is starting to get the better of you and even though you did your weekend hikes and strapped on your pack as much as you could, your body is giving out and it's sending all of its frustrations right down into your hot sweaty boots that suddenly just don't fit right and you can feel the burning sensation of all those hot spots just dying to puss up and take you out of action...(okay, I have less than an hour to write this, so...)

Teva Hurricanes. Been hauling them around for several years now and seen and felt the benefits—never mind that they weigh a little more than so many weight conscious wimps would like them to—they do the job of three pairs of shoes, in my experience. 

  1. Everyone wants a "water shoe" something they can use to get across all the many stream crossings they might encounter, but most if not all "water shoes" are nothing more than a flimsy neoprene slipper designed for wandering on the beach or piloting your jet ski. 
  2. Everyone wants a camp shoe, something they can slip into at the end of the day and just relax in, but these "slippers' are again, not good for much else. 
  3. No one wants or even thinks they need a third pair of footwear suitable for stream crossings, lounging by the fire, or, should something either happen to your main pair of hiking shoes or your feet get injured in some way that you can no longer wear your boots—something that will get you out of the woods, off the trail, to safety. And maybe you really don't need this "third pair" of shoes, but my experiences have proven otherwise. 

I've seen people whose boots got destroyed, fell apart, and all duct-taped up, repeatedly just to help them finish the trail. I've seen people burn their boots in the fire, trying to dry them and ending up with open-toed shoes. I've seen others, as well as myself, who've twisted ankles, making boots too restrictive...and of course, I've seen many with so many blisters and so much pain, but all they have is the one pair of burly boots that inflicted all the damage and what can they do but hobble off the trail, with ugly foot pictures all they have to show (and post on FB!) for all their effort and expense. 

So there you are again, sweaty, full of doubt, and three more blister-inducing miles before you get to your first night's camp and a chance to extricate your soon to be blisters...but if you had a pair of sandals, a pair of Tevas you could slip them on, dunk your tired feet in the next cool stream, and suddenly, your feet would scream out, in pleasure, in relief, to the rest of your body, "we got this, let's keep on going." 

...Look, up there, on the trail, it's a water shoe, no, it's a camp shoe...no, it's a great shoe for backpacking in. It's the Teva Hurricane!!!!!

Alicia TRAILSPACE STAFF

Thanks for an amusing (and helpful) review this morning, JMTx13.


5 days ago
1

Comfortable and easy put-on-and-go sandals that are…

Rating: rated 4 of 5 stars
Source: bought it new
Price Paid: $58

Summary

Comfortable and easy put-on-and-go sandals that are great for anything from a casual work environment to randomly hitting a trail for a day hike.

Pros

  • Durable
  • Good soles
  • Easy to adjust
  • Easy to clean
  • Comfortable

Cons

  • Dirt and grit collects where the foot meets the sandal in little lines

 
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I’m not a hipster. I tend to steer clear of slacklines, fixies and strapping on sandals when I want to be served at a restaurant. There are times (like almost 100 degree weather in the summer) when my feet want something that breathes a bit better than even my lightweight trail runners can give them; so I decided to give Teva (pronounced tay-vuh) a try.

Pros
They fit true to size. If you want to adjust them for wider feet, there are three points to cinch or loosen the velcro straps as needed. After a few games of ultimate frisbee (ok, maybe I’m a little hipster) and running around in general, I can say that they are durable. The soles grip well on rocks and dirt trails just as well as pavement. Some sandals make funny squeaking sounds on pavements, but that doesn't seem to be the case with these.

They support my ankle well, although those with bad ankles already might want something with a bit stiffer support. There was barely any breaking in time that I could tell. The moment I put them on my feet I went to a local trail and did a short afternoon hike. 

As far as the fit of the sandals go, the Hurricane XLT has 3 adjustment points to fit any size feet from narrow to wide.

Cons
The only annoying thing I’ve found so far is the little grooves where you feet touch the sole get dirty fairly fast. Easy enough to clean, but I wish they had found something different to do there.

All in all a great piece of footwear. I would recommend the Hurricane XLT for anything from daily wanderings to throwing into your pack for basecamp.

0

A lightweight durable sandal that can be used around…

Rating: rated 4 of 5 stars
Source: bought it new
Price Paid: $55

Summary

A lightweight durable sandal that can be used around the campsite and during water crossings with excellent grip. The materials are compatible with water and the sandals are comfortable for walking around your campsite while your feet breathe and your footwear dries.

Pros

  • Very durable
  • Comfortable
  • Water compatible

Cons

  • Heavier than some sandals

MY feet get tired of being in the same hiking footwear day after day. I like having something to change into at the campsite and to wear while doing a water crossing.

They are heavier than some simpler lighter sandals, but far more durable. If I am hiking in the backcountry, I do not want to be hauling out a broken sandal. I want a durable, comfortable, water-compatible sandal with good tread for grip so I can use these sandals whenever I am not wearing my normal hiking footwear (including in public showers).