Nemo's first sleeping bags new shape for side-sleepers

Spoon Shaped


Inspecting Nemo's new Spoon Shaped bags at Outdoor Retailer.

Side sleeping is the most common sleep position, preferred by as many as two-thirds of people. But, mummy bags are designed ideally for back sleeping, and side sleepers can find themselves twisting and turning to get comfy.

Nemo's new patent-pending Spoon Shaped sleeping bags for 2013 are designed with side-sleepers in mind. The Spoon Shaped bags are widest around the knees, for more leg wiggle room, but warmer than a traditional rectangular bag. Nemo, known for its unique tents with AirSupported beams, is boldly calling the Spoon Shape a new sleeping bag shape.

"We started by looking at the way people sleep at home; needless to say, very few people choose to sleep in a mummy position," said Nemo founder Cam Brensinger of the company's foray into sleeping bag design.

Each of the four Spoon Shaped men's and women's 600-fill down or Primaloft Synergy bags have Insotect Flow vertical baffles and a detachable hood. Unzip and remove the hood in warm weather and you can flip the bag over for 10 degrees less of insulation on the bottom of the bag.

A Blanket Fold of extra quilted material at the bag's neckline can be folded up for extra warmth on cold nights. Or, when the bag is flipped over and the hood removed in warm weather, folded out and used as a clean spot to put your pillow.

The foot of every Nemo sleeping bag is waterproof and breathable to protect from condensation on shelter walls. All bags will be available by 2013, though a soft launch is possible for 2012.


A men's Spoon Shaped sleeping bag from Nemo.

Rhapsody 15° (women's) and Nocturne 15° (men's)

  • Weight: < 3 lb
  • Fill: 600 down fill
  • MSRP: $289.95 (women's), $299.95 (men's), $329.95 (men's long)

Cadence 25° (women's) and Pulse 25° (men's)

  • Weight: < 3.75 lb
  • Fill: Primaloft Synergy
  • MSRP: $189.95 (women's), $199.95 (men's), $219.95 (men's long)

Calliope 30° (women's) and Muse 30° (men's)

  • Weight: < 2.5 lb
  • Fill: 600 down fill
  • MSRP: $269.95 (women's), $279.95 (men's), $299.95 (men's long)

Harmony 40° (women's) and Rhythm 40° (men's)

  • Weight: < 3.5 lb
  • Fill: Primaloft Synergy
  • MSRP: $169.95 (women's), $179.95 (men's), $199.95 (men's long)

 

Strato Loft


The rectangular and roomy Strato Loft, in foreground.

Nemo also is launching the roomy Strato Loft, a 25°F, 600-fill down rectangular sleeping bag. The Strato Loft has a bottom pocket to hold a Cosmo Air or Cosmo Insulated sleeping pad, horizontal baffles, and stretch construction.

With a generous volume and zippers on each side, the Strato Loft can be zipped with multiple (yes, multiple) Strato Loft bags on either side or both sides.

Strato Loft 25°

  • Weight: < 3 lb
  • Fill: 600 down fill
  • MSRP: $299.95

 

Extreme Conditions


Nemo's -40°F Canon with tunnel hood.

While the Spoon Shaped and Strato Loft bags are designed with room to move, Nemo's Extreme Conditions Technology (ECT) mummy bags are close-fitting and intended for the harshest climates on Earth.

The 850-fill down bags have a center zip, Insotect Flow vertical baffles, a tunnel hood to keep a pocket of warm air near your face ("It's my favorite part," said Kate Ketschek, Nemo's director of marketing and public relations). The head area is designed to fit like a parka ("You can wear it like a jacket" in camp, said Ketschek).

The entire exterior of the ECT bags is made with a Nemo waterproof-breathable fabric.

Canon -40°

  • Weight: < 4.5 lb
  • Fill: 850 down fill
  • MSRP: $749.95 (regular), $789.95 (long)

Anthem -20°

  • Weight: < 3.5 lb
  • Fill: 850 down fill
  • MSRP: $649.95 (regular), $689.95 (long)

Coda 0°

  • Weight: < 3 lb
  • Fill: 850 down fill
  • MSRP: $549.95 (regular), $589.95 (long)

Filed under: Gear News, Outdoor Retailer

Comments

Guyz
153 reviewer rep
235 forum posts
August 10, 2011 at 1:46 p.m. (EDT)

I confess.  I'm a side sleeper.  That will be worth looking into.

Robert Rowe
0 reviewer rep
1,238 forum posts
August 10, 2011 at 2:08 p.m. (EDT)

Hmm ....

At least they are thinking.

I am a side-sleeper.   I HATE mummy bags; have about five ... getting rid of a few, soon.

I LOVE Primaloft.

I would like to see a Primaloft bag (instead of down) similar to the Extreme Conditions Technology bag ... WITH the center-zip.  NON mummy.

Apparently, the  'Bag of My Dreams' does not exist, nor is it on the horizon.

                                                         ~r2~

mahoosucmayhem
63 reviewer rep
190 forum posts
August 16, 2011 at 5:49 p.m. (EDT)

Now we're talkin!  Side sleepers unite!

Callahan
245 reviewer rep
1,469 forum posts
August 16, 2011 at 7:37 p.m. (EDT)

This sounds like a damn good idea.

oruacat2
0 reviewer rep
109 forum posts
August 16, 2011 at 8:09 p.m. (EDT)

I may have mentioned this before, but I still have my OLD Sierra Designs "Sandman - Flex" bags (bought both a LZ and a RZ, but that's another story).   They're pretty good for side-sleeping, too, but not because of the shape so much as the actual design.   The center/torso portion of the bag stretches, and the hood is designed such that if you're a belly-sleeper you can fit both bent arms in the hood, under your pillow.  A bit heavy for backpacking, but comfortable as hell, and really, if you're not sleeping well at night, then all the lightweight gear in the world won't make your trip enjoyable IMO.

canoelover
0 reviewer rep
3 forum posts
August 16, 2011 at 11:20 p.m. (EDT)

Got one coming in a week to test on a few fall trips to Lake Superior, BWCA, etc.  I'll let you know.  Also a committed side-sleeper/spooner.  :-)

selk'man
0 reviewer rep
1 forum posts
August 17, 2011 at 5:43 p.m. (EDT)

Not a bad idea.  Still prefer my Selk'bag.  They have a Primaloft version coming out in December that is supposed to be very, very nice.

apeman
0 reviewer rep
1,237 forum posts
August 23, 2011 at 10:17 p.m. (EDT)

 The Strato Loft is the only quality rectangular sleeping bag that I can find on the market.  I now I'll have to wait a few years, but I will search the world for a used one sinceI flop around all night, kinda like a slow motion fish out of water.  Not a pretty sight I would guess

Robert Rowe
0 reviewer rep
1,238 forum posts
August 23, 2011 at 11:50 p.m. (EDT)

My Wiggy's insulated ("Lamilite")  semi-rectangular  / somewhat tapered overbag, with select liners (depending on temps) has worked pretty darn well for me, over the years.   Think it's mil-spec.  The material is definitely "bomber", without any exaggeration.   Massive YKK zipper.  Also, has inner-zipper ... apparently for a companion zip-in liner, but I neglected to buy one at time of purchase.   I've used it down to about zero degrees (with a liner ... an old Moonstone job).

My 'go-to' bag.   Have sold a couple high-end (MH, TNF) down mummy bags that simply were not providing me a good night's rest.  

The liners that are available these days are not really roomy enough ... but, not bad.   They are sort-of a cross between a mummy and a semi-rect-.   I have about a half-dozen liners, of various temp-ratings and materials, including Cool-Max and impregnated with 'insect*shield'.    Can't find any that have a zipper or snaps.  I did run across a TNF liner-Summer rect-  (45-50-degree ?) that had a zipper ... but, it was about $100.

See if you can find one (Wiggys), Brian.  You seem to find great deals on Craig'sList.   You might be surprised.

Got mine at Cabela's about 10 years ago.   They no longer offer the exact same one ... but, a few similar.   They have an XL-size that is HUGE.

Must be something good.   I've had several friends borrow it, and I had a tough job getting it back.   They all wanted to buy it.

                                                       ~r2~

pillowthread
REVIEW CORPS
1,195 reviewer rep
1,064 forum posts
August 24, 2011 at 12:15 a.m. (EDT)

I'm a stomach(!!) sleeper most of the time, though I also sleep on my back and side. I think these Nemo bags truly do have cool ideas and innovations, and I applaud their contribution to the evolution of sleeping bags, but they are overly complicated, and thus, heavy for their temp. ratings. They would be great options, I think, if I was interested in carrying so much weight. For my needs, I've found an impressive solution in a Jacks-R-Better quilt. I have the collaboration they did with Titanium Goat. For comparison: it's a 900 fill, 21 ounce flat quilt that measures 82"x 52" in the long version. It's good to around 25F, and I haven't had one down feather leak through the Intrepid fabric in over 10 nights of use. Omni-Tape and a drawstring close up the foot-box when needed, while lacing tabs provide ways to rig a light cord system under the torso, providing, with supplemental clothing as necessary, options which allow comfortable sleeping from 70F down to 15F.

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