Evernew and Jetboil offer titanium cooking systems

Titanium is all the rage in stoves and cookware at Outdoor Retailer this summer, including these new offerings from Evernew and Jetboil.

Evernew


Evernew Appalachian Set

Evernew America, a company known for its titanium cookware, was showing an interesting integrated stove-and-cookset nicknamed the Appalachian Set.

The Appalachian Set includes five interchangeable components (also available separately) that together create a versatile, light stove system.

An ultralight titanium alcohol stove forms the center of the system, which nests in two interlocking cylinders. The stove, nested in the cylinders, forms a stand for a 500-ml pot.

The pot incorporates a raised ridge on its underside, to prevent it from sliding off the top of the stove and dumping ramen on your lap.

A separate titanium trivet enables users to dispense with the locking cylinders in still weather and cook directly on the stove. Out of alcohol? Set up the cylinders without the stove and you have a serviceable micro-wood fueled stove.

Evernew Appalachian Set

  • Weight: 5.8 oz
  • MSRP: $138
  • Available: Now

Components of this Appalachian Set are available individually and in various combinations for those who want to assemble custom sets.

Evernew America Appalachian
Evernew Appalachian Set components

Ti Alcohol Stove

  • Weight: 1.2 oz
  • Fuel Capacity: 2.37 fl oz
  • MSRP: $52

Ti Trivet (not included in set)

  • Weight: .56 oz
  • MSRP: $14

Ti Alcohol Stove w/ Stand DX-Set (stove and stand)

  • Weight: 3.03 oz
  • MSRP: $98

Ti Stove Stand DX (just stand)

  • Weight: 1.83 oz
  • MSRP: $54

Ti Mug Pot

  • Weight: 2.6 oz
  • MSRP: $52

Jetboil


Jetboil's 1.8-liter titanium Sumo companion cup

Jetboil will release a titanium version of its newest high capacity cooking system, the Sumo Ti, as part of a group cooking system for 2012.

The 1.8-liter Sumo Ti is designed for groups of two to four people and weighs just 12 ounces. For comparison, the 1.5-liter Group Cooking System (GCS) it replaces weighs 20 ounces, and the 1-liter aluminum Flash weighs 14 ounces. The system, with Sumo titanium companion cup, uses the same all-weather burner as the Sol, which is not titanium.

Available separately are three Sumo Companion accessory bowls: two 23-oz/675 ml and one 15-oz/450 ml. The bowls let a family of three enjoy three separate meals from the same stove, or let a couple enjoy two meals and hot beverage. The polypropylene bowls have snap-on, drink-through lids, and insulated cozies.

Jetboil also has a hard anodized aluminum Sumo cooking system that weighs 16 ounces. It's also powered by same burner as the Sol, which incorporates regulator technology to maintain consistent pressure and output down to 20 degrees and includes the high capacity 1.8-liter Sumo companion cup.

Jetboil Sumo Ti System

  • Weight: 12 oz*
  • Volume: 1.8 L
  • Boil time: 16 oz in 2 min 15 sec
  • Available: February 1, 2012
  • MSRP: $189.99

Jetboil Sumo Al System

  • Weight: 16 oz*
  • Volume: 1.8 L
  • Boil time: 16 oz in 2 min 15 sec
  • Available: February 1, 2012
  • MSRP: $129.99

*Note: Neither Sumo cooking system includes the weight of the included pot support and fuel stabilizer accessories.

  • Pot Support: 1.2 oz
  • Fuel Stabilizer: .9 oz

Filed under: Gear News, Outdoor Retailer

Comments

Louis-Alexis
171 reviewer rep
223 forum posts
August 10, 2011 at 7:04 p.m. (EDT)

Wow! Nice evernew atove I wanna het ma hands on one of them!!

Robert Rowe
0 reviewer rep
1,238 forum posts
August 18, 2011 at 10:34 a.m. (EDT)

I'm not impressed.

True -- titanium is lighter than aluminum.  Not sure of ratio / per-centage.

BUT, titanium does NOT score well with heat-transfer ... NOR, heat-retention.    Your titanium mug of hot coffee is going to get cool very fast.   Now whadda 'Ya gonna do?   Re-heat it?  Like cold coffee ?   Better gulp it fast, Bubba !

In-other-words, titanium is not as efficient for cooking as aluminum.  Also, cooking with aluminum will consume LESS fuel, as it heats-up faster.   You SAVE money on fuel.  

  Even better (the best?) in these criteria, is copper.   Best heat transfer ... best heat retention ... most even heating  (no "hot spots").   The best  professional chefs in the world use copper cookware made in France ("Mauviel"-brand).   NOT light, due to heavy-gauge.     Expensive.   One of my skillets was over $200

At what cost lightness ... for ounces saved ?

Hmmm ....

                                                         ~r2~

hikin_jim
81 reviewer rep
422 forum posts
August 18, 2011 at 6:14 p.m. (EDT)

Titanium is definitely not the best for a real chef.  As Robert points out, it doesn't conduct heat well.  Ti is famous for "hot spots" right where the flame hits the pot or pan.  Such "hot spots" often translate to a burned spot in your food.

If you're just boiling water, Ti isn't bad, and it is light weight.  In the article, there is a quarter pound difference between the Sumo Al version vs. the Sumo Ti version.  But won't Ti use more fuel since it doesn't conduct heat as well as Al?  Not necessarily.  Ti, because it is so strong, is most often used in pots with very thin walls.  In other words, that Al pot has to have thicker walls in order to be reasonably strong whereas a Ti pot can have very thin walls and still be quite strong.  Because of the typical thinness of Ti pot walls, you're actually not using a lot of fuel compared to an Al pot.

Now, if Jetboil were to make the heat exchanger out of Ti, I think that would be a bad idea.  You want a heat exchanger to conduct heat from the flame to the pot.  Ti, being a poor conductor, isn't a good choice for that job.

So is Ti cookware good or bad?  Well, it kind of depends on you and your style.  If you love to cook and want to make "real" food, you'll probably want an aluminum pot or pan. 

If all you're going to do is boil water and you're willing to pay the price for more expensive Titanium, then why not?  You will definitely save weight.

HJ

Robert Rowe
0 reviewer rep
1,238 forum posts
August 18, 2011 at 7:38 p.m. (EDT)

Thanks for your insight, Jim.

ALWAYS appreciated !

                                                     ~r2~

Louis-Alexis
171 reviewer rep
223 forum posts
August 19, 2011 at 11:24 a.m. (EDT)

Boiling water for me! :-)

300winmag
493 reviewer rep
277 forum posts
August 19, 2011 at 11:03 p.m. (EDT)

Titanium pots - another step backwards. Hard anodized or non-stick aluminum is better in so many ways.

Ti is great for my Caldera Cone Sidewinder/Inferno woodburner but not for cookware. However ti cookware's "elite" appeal cannot be denied.

Callahan
245 reviewer rep
1,469 forum posts
August 20, 2011 at 12:19 a.m. (EDT)

I would have to agree that the Black Lite MSR Gourmet Cookset that I have and use is hard for me to move away from.  I hardly ever take all three pots with me but have a good choice.  Always take the fry pan and usually the largest pot, most times with the lid.  The non-stick is still working great and there is no need for butter or oil or spray with the pancakes on cold mornings.  If I am cooking on the fire grill I use the GSI OUTDOORS Glacier Stainless Bottle Cup/Pot to boil the water for coffee, the MSR Frypan for the pancakes and the Pot for the eggs and bacon.  UM ummmmm

I really could suffice with just the cup and frypan, with lid.

But respectfully my choice is different to the next person and I enjoy hearing most other comments.

Robert Rowe
0 reviewer rep
1,238 forum posts
August 20, 2011 at 8:39 a.m. (EDT)

300winmag said:

Titanium  -  cookware's "elite" appeal cannot be denied.

 Apparently so.

Interesting that the "elite" professional chefs, worldwide, use copper cookware (see my post above).  "Mauviel"-brand, from France.   Check it out on eBay, or the Williams-Sonoma website.  If you ever acquire a piece-or-two, you will understand why.   Also, it is an investment.   The stuff has become "collector grade".

Thinner-gauged copper is NOT heavy.  I'm wondering why (?) no outdoor gear manufacturers have looked into this.

Very good thinner-gauge copper cookwear  (for home use) comes from Portugal and South Korea.  It is light.   I have found thrift-stores (GoodWill, Salvation Army), to be a treasure-trove for these items.

                                                           ~r2~

Bob83318
2 reviewer rep
6 forum posts
August 22, 2011 at 11:21 a.m. (EDT)

Used the Black Lite for years and was happy.  Now using the small Snowpeak Ti solo set since I'm usually alone.  For boiling water and even cooking cereal in the morning (hate instant) it works great paired with my MSR Pocket Rocket.  I think considering size, cost and weight it's very good setup.  

whomeworry
102 reviewer rep
2,295 forum posts
September 27, 2011 at 5:11 p.m. (EDT)

hikin_jim said:

..If all you're going to do is boil water and you're willing to pay the price for more expensive Titanium, then why not?  You will definitely save weight.

HJ

That is debatable and probably something one of our stove experts can reseach.  Ti may be lighter, but since it conducts heat poorly, it will require a greater amount of fuel to heat a given volume of water, since a significant portion of stove heat never makes it to the pot contents.  Lighter pot, but more fuel.

Ed 

hikin_jim
81 reviewer rep
422 forum posts
September 28, 2011 at 12:29 a.m. (EDT)

whomeworry said:

Ti may be lighter, but since it conducts heat poorly, it will require a greater amount of fuel to heat a given volume of water, since a significant portion of stove heat never makes it to the pot contents.  Lighter pot, but more fuel.

Ed 

 Ed:

Probably not.  Ti is incredibly strong, and pots made of Ti are generally much thinner than the equivalent Al pot.  It's generally a wash in terms of fuel expenditure between thinner but worse conducting Ti and thicker but better conducting Al.  Ti represents a real overall weight savings, but isn't particularly good for "real cooking".  Ti fry pans are notorious for burning things.

HJ

whiteout
8 reviewer rep
16 forum posts
November 6, 2011 at 10:18 a.m. (EST)

Tested Jetboil Solo with aluminium a few weeks back on the AT and was very pleased. Ti wasn't out when I bought so I'll stick with al until I see a performance difference.

whiteout

  

GaryPalmer
210 reviewer rep
4,226 forum posts
November 7, 2011 at 10:57 a.m. (EST)

 

My steel MSR Stowaway 1 quart cook pot weighs less than a pound and holds my MSR Pocket Rocket stove, lighter, spoon and green scrubby inside its sealable lid (see picture below)


MSR-Stowaway-pot.jpg

The way I cook only bring water to a boil, turning off stove and covering pot then soaking pasta and rice for 10 minutes instead of simmering, I find a regular 4 oz fuel canister will last me at least 2 weeks 


Pocket-Rocket-stove-and-canister.jpg

Pocket Rocket stove and 4 oz canister
Stove-container.jpg

Stove's container


 

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