Open main menu

So what are you carrying that you probably could leave but gives you peace of mind.

Quote from Joseph Renow in an earlier post.-Give everything in your pack a serious examination and ask 1) what is the likelihood of using any particular item?

Lets leave off guns and discuss everything else. I have several items but I'd like to hear from you guys first.

Old reliable space blanket...only used one once in 30 years but really appreciated it when everything else was soaked...long story. Every time I pack, I consider leaving it out, but it always ends up in the pack.

So...this is  little more than what you are asking about i think, but its all stuff I could leave behind if i really needed to.

Trekking poles

Extra batteries

Extra food

Extra clothes

Extra butane lighter

Field manuals (plants & animals)

Camera

Water treatment tablets (in case i need them)

4" bushcraft knife

Extra flashlight 

Mike has the right idea.

I attempted to list items, but realized the whole point of this exercise is unclear. 

Am I listing items that provide peace of mind from a safety point of view (e.g. space blanket, rain gear), items that are nonessential to survival but address contingency situations (mole skin, sewing kit, duct tape, extra batteries and fuel), or do we consider items merely there for creature comforts (bug nets, monocular, clothes line)  My list could be quite long.  We could leave almost everything behind, a la John Muir and carry only a bed roll and some bread and nuts in a overcoat.  Is there a point to this exercise?

Ed 

 

A Book..I take one adventure book with me....I could leave it home...

My Bodum mini 3 cup French Press. It takes up space and is pretty difficult to clean....but it sure beats drinking instant.

Other than an extra water filter, everything that I could list has already been mentioned. My pack is put together based upon the idea that "it's better to have it and not need it, than need it and not have it".  Within reasonable parameters of course. 

For luxury items it would be my Canon G16 camera. I definitely don't need it, but I like being able to take pictures of where I've been, so it usually comes along (except when running)

For safety items, I have a prepared small emergency stuff sack that I throw in my pack with things like a space blanket, straw filter, emergency e-Lite, whistle, a few zipties, and more. Sometimes there's redundancy in there from what I'm already carrying. For example, I don't automatically go in and take out the e-Lite when I'm carrying a headlamp, because I'd rather not monkey around with the emergency bag.

On the flip side, here's something I thought I could leave behind but have had to remind myself to carry for peace of mind—an EpiPen. I have a potential bee sting allergy, noted after I had increasing reactions to yellow jacket stings last year. My doctor thought I should have an EpiPen, especially since I go off doing stuff outdoors, sometimes alone. I generally remember it for hikes, long runs, mountain biking, camping, travel, etc, but not for all short trail runs close to home (I realize that is not wholly logical and bees don't care where you live).

Well, I got stung (lightly) on the face a week or so ago while running by myself on a quiet camp road, with no EpiPen or phone on me. Despite some numbness in the face and one brief but scary throat constriction while alone on a trail connecting over to another road, I survived the mile-long walk/run home. There I took some Benadryl and everything passed.

Carrying the EpiPen when I have a backpack on has been a no-brainer, but I'm getting a Spibelt for when I need to carry only the EpiPen and some Benadryl on shorter runs. 

I was lucky it was a light glancing sting from running into the bee, versus a bunch of angry yellow jacket stings, and am chalking the whole thing up to a learning experience.

I usually take some doubt with me on hiking trips, but from now on I am leaving it behind.

ppine said:

I usually take some doubt with me on hiking trips, but from now on I am leaving it behind.

 I'm still laughing -I think you hit it right on the head. GOOD ONE. you got me thinking maybe I ought to leave behind second guessing also.

extras I carry

1. safety- 2 xtra lites most times, a pocket ponch in case I run across someone needing it (on trail one time a couple an baby were caught in freezing rain with no protection and since then I make it a point to have one), xtra knife or multi tool. candles ,fire starter, and a tarp that paid off in spades 2 weeks ago when the water proofing completely broke down all at once on my REI Half Dome Two+ on the laurel Flats trail N.C. threw it over the tent.

2. comfort- REI TRAIL CHAIR/LOUNGER great in the rain and works like a 3/4 pad and it makes a great recliner plus because it extends down to the calves keeps you out of the dirt and mud.

3. Just because- something new to try out.

 

Alicia said:

For luxury items it would be my Canon G16 camera. I definitely don't need it, but I like being able to take pictures of where I've been, so it usually comes along (except when running)

For safety items, I have a prepared small emergency stuff sack that I throw in my pack with things like a space blanket, straw filter, emergency e-Lite, whistle, a few zipties, and more. Sometimes there's redundancy in there from what I'm already carrying. For example, I don't automatically go in and take out the e-Lite when I'm carrying a headlamp, because I'd rather not monkey around with the emergency bag.

On the flip side, here's something I thought I could leave behind but have had to remind myself to carry for peace of mind—an EpiPen. I have a potential bee sting allergy, noted after I had increasing reactions to yellow jacket stings last year. My doctor thought I should have an EpiPen, especially since I go off doing stuff outdoors, sometimes alone. I generally remember it for hikes, long runs, mountain biking, camping, travel, etc, but not for all short trail runs close to home (I realize that is not wholly logical and bees don't care where you live).

Well, I got stung (lightly) on the face a week or so ago while running by myself on a quiet camp road, with no EpiPen or phone on me. Despite some numbness in the face and one brief but scary throat constriction while alone on a trail connecting over to another road, I survived the mile-long walk/run home. There I took some Benadryl and everything passed.

Carrying the EpiPen when I have a backpack on has been a no-brainer, but I'm getting a Spibelt for when I need to carry only the EpiPen and some Benadryl on shorter runs. 

I was lucky it was a light glancing sting from running into the bee, versus a bunch of angry yellow jacket stings, and am chalking the whole thing up to a learning experience.

 Glad your ok- that is scary stuff. One of the kids I was in charge of at work several years ago got stung and I was really worried about him it was bad his mom and wife came on the run from 30 miles away to get him his shot.I made it to him just as they arrived. I carry a pretty extensive basic first aid kit but it leans more toward survival IE Badages knife lighter candles and such my Nephew inlaw is an emt so he helped with what was needed then I added thoses others maybe I should add some of that stuff also.

Thanks, John.

I'm fine, though there was a brief but uncomfortable moment where I felt more in tune with my mortality (perhaps that's a good thing every now and then though, as it forces you to reevaluate what you're doing and make better decisions).

Since I've had relatively minor but increasing sting reactions I've chalked it up to not being a big deal (hey, I'm not really allergic, right?), but I've realized that if I do have a full-on reaction there won't be a big warning to get ready. It will only matter that I'd been prepared or not beforehand. I won't get to say, "oh look, I am really allergic. Guess I should go get that EpiPen now."

As for carrying an EpiPen for others in a first aid kit, I've learned that they expire and are very expensive (at least mine was through my insurance). I can see it being potentially useful for some group leaders and emergency folks though, provided they know what they're doing. I did show my kids how to use it (it comes with a practice plunger).

Like Alicia, i have to carry an epipen for bee stings. I used to be able to buy them one at a time. A few years ago i learned you could only buy them in 2 packs, at least where i live, both with the same expiration date.

The pharmacist explaned to me the reasoning was so that you could keep one at home and one in the car. I just went and found a buddy who needed one also and split the cost with him.

Anyhow, first aid stuff is something that i never sacrifice to save weight or bulk, im sure most folks feel the same way.

I was just up in Oregon in cool and wet conditions and got attacked by a hornet's nest. Got stung 4 times and they are still sore. It made me think about anaphalatic shock. My ex-wife used to be susceptible to it.

My bamboo hiking stick.  It's light as a feather and strong as an ox, but I end up carrying it much more than using it, yet I know I'll continue toting it.

A book to write notes in and its pencil, my harmonica which I can't play worth a toot but I still do, often a map [in areas I know so well I walk them at night when the moon is out], an extra knife, sometimes small binoculars which I never seem to use, 1/2 the snacks I carry since there is only one of me,

I tried to go without my trusty notebook the other week and just jot a few notes on the back of a map. Didn't work the same for me so its back in the pack. I also carry small binocs but have begun weaning myself on "green tunnel" trips. Still can't leave them behind when I have views or lots of bird potential but hardly seem to use them.

A few years ago, Barb had an anaphylactic reaction to something that landed her in the ICU for several days at Stanford Hospital. Despite lots of tests, blood samples, etc, the doctors (including the researchers at Stanford, which is one of the world's leading hospitals, connected with a major university) still don't know. The closest they have come was that she had taken an ibuprofen pill shortly before. I got a call at work from our son saying that something was wrong with mother. I headed home immediately. She was barely conscious and kept insisting that there was no problem and she did not want to be any trouble. Our son and I got her into the car and over to Urgent Care at our HMO 10 minutes away. The staff could not get a blood pressure, so they called 911. The paramedics found her BP to be 60/30 and had her over the few blocks to Stanford in minutes.

She now keeps a Steripen handy (yes, min package of 2) and wears a RoadID that noted prominently "No NSAIDS" - which means aspirin, ibprofen, naproxin, and prescription NSAIDS. Acetaminophen(Tylenol) is ok, though it has serious side effects for the liver (like death if you take too much).

We have asked a couple of times if there is a way to check to see if that was a 1-time reaction and she could safely take NSAIDS in the future. The reply from our Primary Care Physician (who has been our doctor for 30 years now) and from the researchers is "NO!! - We still don't know how we got you out of it. We do not even know for sure what the trigger was."

Needless to say, we watch everything closely. I do not want to lose my constant companion of almost 50 years, the Mother of our son.

I'll also tote along a Missouri Meerschaum Legend cob and a pouch of Samuel Gawith Squadron, Leader or Esoterica Penzance.  One of life's luxuries I choose not to do without.

Speaking of life's luxuries...forgot to mention a flask of single malt scotch...Laphroaig usually. Just enough for an after dinner dram or two.

Fear is the good friend of doubt, which is also best left at the trailhead.

Even in hot summer days I carry my down jacket--because it makes such a great pillow at night. 

Also, even though I seldom build a fire, I still carry everything to start one. 

G00SE said:

"Also, even though I seldom build a fire, I still carry everything to start one. "

 Smart man. 

Maybe we can chose another topic.

ppine said:

Maybe we can chose another topic.

 Fine by me, but you're the one who brought the topic up.  I just wanted to correct your incorrect premise or assumption.

And now we can see why John said to leave guns out of the discussion in his original post.

Just to bring the discussion back on topic; Thinking about this thread I joked several times on my last trip that I could probably leave the third lighter home, yet it comes along on every time.

John Starnes said:

Quote from Joseph Renow in an earlier post.-Give everything in your pack a serious examination and ask 1) what is the likelihood of using any particular item?

Lets leave off guns and discuss everything else. I have several items but I'd like to hear from you guys first.

 Yes, lets please leave  guns out of the discussion because it always devolves into an argument.

Thanks Mike that's exactly why I said that 

LoneStranger said:

And now we can see why John said to leave guns out of the discussion in his original post.

Just to bring the discussion back on topic; Thinking about this thread I joked several times on my last trip that I could probably leave the third lighter home, yet it comes along on every time.

 I see quite a few of us think alike and carry backups for the backups 

I only carry one lighter but it is a backup to my flint starter, and is backed up by a pack of stormproof matches. Same concpet as three lighters I guess.

Also always bring a fleece Jacket I have..It's think polarguard but weighs 14 oz...But its warm...

I, too, carry at least triple redundancy, regarding lighters.  But that is because I camp with a space case who has a penchant for misplacing items.

I also take along a butane hurricane lighter but it is reserved for true emergencies.  So far  the only time it is ignited is during pre-trip tests to assure it still works.

Redundant lighter talk makes me recall a rather nitwitted redundancy:

Do you know why the Valley Girl takes two birth control pills daily?

To be for sure for sure!  Dude!

And then there is the joke about the difference between excess and surplus, but I cannot expound further, as the punch line is NSFW.

Ed

I'll bring a backup LED light. It's so backup that I've never used it and it may very well not work anymore.

FlipNC said:

I only carry one lighter but it is a backup to my flint starter, and is backed up by a pack of stormproof matches. Same concpet as three lighters I guess.

 That's about what I do, although on simple trips close to home I just bring two lighters.

Everything in my pack gives me peace of mind, and is pretty much pared down already. If i leave something behind now, then i would be missing it more than likely.

The
Rambler has just clearly stated the philosophy of modern backpacking.

No just in case items belong in the pack.

My GPS.  I love having it while out in the woods. 

The mobile phone I would rather not take, but my wife insists that I carry that, because most of my hikes are solo. 

Also, after every trip, I go down my list and check whether I used it or not. 

Some examples of  things I have noted over the years:

least used: 

First Aid Kit; whistle, fire starter

Rarely used:  knife, lighter, miniature headlamp (spare)

Most Used:

GPS, shelter, sleeping bag, camera, cook set/stove (used on every trip);staff; water filter

Then there is everything in between such as rain gear, spare synthetic briefs; tee for sleeping

Would i leave any of the above at home?  Most likely not. 

 

 

 

Soleful...it depends on your needs...but since your wife insist that you bring your phone you might be able to keep some of those things at home.

1) A "flashlight app" to replace secondary headlamp - I am not sure about how long the flashlight on my phone would work...but I don't do a lot of hiking in the dark so it works great as a light carried in my pants in camp or next to me in my sleeping bag (I rarely use my headlamp now).

2) A "GPS app" such as Backcountry or Trimble to replace individual GPS unit - My GPS needs are mostly that of convenience...the Backcountry app has worked brilliantly for me...and saving maps for when cell reception is unknown is super easy.

3) Phone to replace digital camera - I don't know what your camera demands are...if you're using lenses then obviously your committed to the enterprise...but I find the primary camera on my phone adequate for my needs.

** I purchased my phone with Nextradio (not a radio app) so that I could use my phone to replace the small Sony radio I bring if severe weather is a possibility...the radio is AM/FM so it not an equal swap for the FM only phone...but the Sony is now restricted to Canoe trips.

I take my Sling-Light chair or I'm not going.

if I pack it I need it. I worked for years out of a backpack and my body armor and it's pouches and what I could carry in my pockets so I learned to go with needs over wants and things I might use.

An extra set of earbuds. First off, do I really even need a single pair? Probably not. But sometimes when a tent mate snores, or you are tenting too close to a stream it's nice to drown out the background noise. But I still have an extra set in the hip let of my pack "just in case". 

Every Christmas when my son was young he liked to give me things he thought would be cool for my backpack. They were mostly things I would never use or choose for myself but I would always take them along on a hike. He is 17 now,  I still carry a few of them in my pack. Not useful items, but sentimental. 

September 18, 2020
Quick Reply

Please sign in to reply