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Backpacks

Whether you’re setting off on an alpine climb, afternoon trail run, or extended thru hike, you need a pack to carry your outdoor gear and essentials while on the go.

Below you'll find our top picks for the best backpacks for hiking, backpacking, climbing, mountaineering, trail running, and more, thanks to hundreds of independent reviews by real hikers, backpackers, alpinists, and other outdoor enthusiasts.

From field-tested ultralight packs to load haulers to kid carriers to hydration packs, our reviewers have shared their real-world experience to help you select an appropriate, dependable backpack for your next outdoor adventure. Find your pack. Pack your gear. Head out.

The best backpacks, reviewed and curated by the Trailspace community. The latest review was added on September 26, 2022. Stores' prices and availability are updated daily.

user rating: 5 of 5 (7)
CamelBak Cloud Walker Hydration Pack
$80 - $90
user rating: 5 of 5 (7)
Osprey Aura 65 Weekend
$325
user rating: 5 of 5 (6)
The North Face Terra 40 Overnight
$149
user rating: 5 of 5 (6)
Deuter Kid Comfort Child Carrier Frame
$300 - $320
user rating: 5 of 5 (5)
Osprey Talon 11 Daypack
$92 - $140
user rating: 5 of 5 (5)
CamelBak H.A.W.G. Hydration Pack
$207
user rating: 5 of 5 (5)
Deuter Futura 32 Daypack
$170
user rating: 5 of 5 (4)
Hyperlite Mountain Gear 2400 Southwest Overnight
$349 - $369
user rating: 5 of 5 (4)
Granite Gear Round Rock Solid Compression Compression Sack
$29
user rating: 5 of 5 (4)
Sea to Summit Ultra-Sil Pack Cover Pack Cover
$30 - $44
user rating: 5 of 5 (4)
REI Trail 40 Overnight
$129
user rating: 5 of 5 (4)
Gregory Baltoro 85 Expedition
$350 - $379
user rating: 5 of 5 (4)
Patagonia Atom Sling 8L Daypack
$59 - $65
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Patagonia Black Hole Duffel Pack Duffel
$129 - $219
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Deuter Trans Alpine 30 Daypack
$130 - $145
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Mystery Ranch Glacier Weekend
$315 - $375
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Gregory Miwok 18 Daypack
$70 - $109
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
SealLine Pro Dry Pack Dry Pack
$250 - $289
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Osprey Sirrus 24 Daypack
$104 - $175
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Mountainsmith Lariat 65 Weekend
$230
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Hyperlite Mountain Gear 3400 Porter Weekend
$389
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Mountainsmith Scream 25 Daypack
$80
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Osprey Aura AG 50 Weekend
$180 - $300
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Osprey Exos 48 Overnight
$200 - $240
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (31)
Osprey Atmos 65 Weekend
$325
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (25)
Osprey Exos 58 Weekend
$220 - $260
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (19)
Osprey Talon 44 Overnight
$180 - $200
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (18)
CamelBak M.U.L.E. Hydration Pack
$70 - $164
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (17)
Deuter ACT Lite 65+10 Weekend
$220
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (16)
Osprey Kestrel 48 Overnight
$180 - $200
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (16)
Osprey Talon 22 Daypack
$120 - $160
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (16)
Gregory Baltoro 65 Weekend
$220 - $319
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (16)
Deuter Aircontact 75+10 Expedition
$310
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (15)
CamelBak Rim Runner Hydration Pack
$100
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (13)
REI Flash 18 Daypack
$40
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (12)
Mountainsmith Day Lumbar/Hip Pack
$40 - $89
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (11)
Sea to Summit eVent Compression Dry Sack Dry Bag / Compression Sack
$33 - $52
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (11)
Mountainsmith Tour Lumbar/Hip Pack
$43 - $79
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (10)
Osprey Kestrel 38 Overnight
$180
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (10)
Mountainsmith Bugaboo Daypack
$80
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (8)
Kelty Trekker 65 External Frame
$230
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (8)
The North Face Terra 65 Weekend
$142 - $189
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Osprey UL Raincover Pack Cover
$30 - $44
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Hyperlite Mountain Gear 3400 Windrider Weekend
$345 - $378
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Deuter Futura Pro 34 SL Overnight
$190
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Gregory Alpaca Duffle Pack Duffel
$90 - $179
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Mystery Ranch Coulee 40 Overnight
$229 - $249
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Fjallraven Kajka 75 Expedition
$400
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How to Choose a Backpack

Like most outdoor gear, choosing the right backpack depends on how you plan to use it and selecting one that fits you, your needs, your budget, and your gear.

Capacity (or How Big?)

Consider the following questions to help determine capacity, or how big of a pack you really need.

  • How long are you heading out for: a day, an overnight, a week?
  • What's your outdoor style? Are you a minimalist, or deeply attached to creature comforts, or somewhere in between?
  • How much and what gear will you bring for specific trips and activities? Don't forget group gear and seasonal items (for example: winter gear will take up more room).

Pack Sizes

Obviously you need a backpack that fits all your gear. If possible, lay it all out, including food and water, and be honest about what you'll need to fit in your pack.

Backpack sizing varies between individuals and manufacturers, but the following ranges are a basic starting point:

  • Day Pack:
    less than 2,000 cubic inches
    up to 30 liters
  • Overnight:
    2,000 - 2,999 cubic inches
    30-50 liters
  • Weekend and Multi-Day:
    3,000 - 4,499 cubic inches
    50-73 liters
  • Week-Long and Expedition:
    4,500+ cubic inches
    74 liters and up

Pack Tip: Don't buy a backpack bigger than you need. You'll be tempted to fill it and carry more than necessary, or you'll end up with an annoying floppy, half-filled pack.

Fit (Is It Comfy?)

Nothing beats the expertise of a knowledgeable pack fitter. Find one at your local outdoor retailer. In the meantime, here are some additional tips to help you choose a backpack that fits you well.

Torso Length

Size a backpack to your torso length. Don't assume you need the tall (or the regular or the short) model based on your height. The sizes of different manufacturers' frames may correspond to different torso lengths. Check each pack's technical specifications.

To find your torso length, have someone measure from the iliac crest at the top of your hipbone to the prominent bone at the base of your neck (the seventh cervical vertebrae). (See how to properly fit a backpack in this instructional video.)

Pack Gender

Many pack manufacturers produce women-specific or short torso versions. Women, kids, and others with short torsos can consider backpacks sized for them. On average, these fit the average woman better.

Pack Tip: Don't get stuck on a pack's gender though. Buy the one that fits you best.

Straps and Padding

Shoulder straps, which control the fit of the suspension system, should be well padded and adjustable.

An adjustable sternum strap, which connects the shoulder straps, helps bring the load weight forward and off your shoulders.

Since it supports your pack's weight, make sure the hipbelt provides adequate padding. Some pack makers offer interchangeable hipbelts in different styles and in sizes for both men and women for a better individual fit.

Load

Fitting your gear in the pack is one thing. Making sure it rides comfortably is another. What's the typical weight of your gear? Check that it matches the manufacturer's recommendation, particularly if you're opting for an ultralight pack.

During a fitting, load the pack with weight to see how well it carries. Walk around with the loaded pack, practice taking it on and off, move around, and climb up and down stairs and slopes.

How well is the pack's load distributed? Does it remain comfortable over its carrying capacity and intended uses? Does it feel stable?

 

Features & Organization

Consider the pack's organization. Is equipment stowed securely? Is it easy to access? Intuitive?

If you'll be carrying any specialty gear, such as ice axes, snowshoes, skis, or a snowboard, look for a pack with features or accessories designed to hold those items, rather than trying to jury-rig them on later.

Depending on your different activities you may need more than one backpack, perhaps a large internal frame pack for multi-day backpacking trips and a small daypack for day hikes.

Find the best pack for you and your activities and you'll be ready to hit the trail.

Recent Backpack Reviews

rated 1 of 5 stars
High Sierra Long Trail 90

The is lits Tidur hiking dalam bulan... Full review

rated 4.5 of 5 stars
Evoc Hip Pouch Pro

A compact, no-bounce fanny pack with a reliable water bottle holster and just enough pocket room for running and riding essentials. Cell phone pocket need optimizing and a raincoat. I needed a runner’s fanny pack that works juuuust right. I have one with a nice, easy in and out water bottle holster, but the two thin, triangular pockets just barely hold a Snickers, never mind my cell phone or a buff. Toooo small. Another has a 1000L main compartment, nice to be able to hold Snickers and phone and… Full review

rated 5 of 5 stars
BlackWolf Maikoh 70

Very comfortable pack with plenty of pockets to keep your goods nicely stowed. Ideal for a weekender or multiday hike Bought this pack when I decided to move into the long distance hiking game and it is proving to be a great decision. The Black Wolf Maikoh 70 is a very comfortable pack with plenty of storage options to keep your gear nicely stowed, ideal if you’re anything like me and hate bits and pieces dangling off your bag. The main storage area has three entry points—top, middle and bottom—with… Full review

rated 2 of 5 stars
Osprey Aether Plus 100

Mediocre build quality. Mediocre to good carrying comfort. I did a 133 km in mountain ranges in Norway with this back, carrying  24 kg with the backpack. Never again. This is not a backpack for carrying more then 17-18 kg. If you carry more, the carrying comfort is very questionable. When I lift the bag it makes sounds as if it is going to break, split, or tear.  I don't understand where the good reviews come from. This is one of the worst backpacks I have had until now. But I am spoiled. I use… Full review

rated 4 of 5 stars
MEI Flying Scotsman II

Clamshell opening and really tough. Survived 28 countries over 5 years backpacking. I loved it. It was my companion for some very exciting and terrifying experiences. The fact you could get into it when locked bothered me a lot. Oh and I ended up setting an 8kg limit on my carry weight as I'm small and want to enjoy travel and not feel like a pack horse. So you need discipline with this bag! But it's FABULOUS to have the hybrid capabilities of duffle, clamshell opening etc. I would like to find… Full review

rated 5 of 5 stars
Hyperlite Mountain Gear 2400 Southwest

Spacious and waterproof bag for ultralight hiking. The thing is so light and works great! I love the outside pockets and fold-close top to keep any water out. This backpack is AMAZING. It's CRAZY light It's waterproof (so you don't need a separate backpack cover) All my gear for a week-long backpacking trip fit perfectly The weight was well distributed, but my left hip did become a little sore after a long 10+ mile day If you want to get into ultralight backpacking, this is one of the best packs… Full review

rated 4.5 of 5 stars
Osprey Stratos 34

Incredibly comfortable pack for long day hikes. Superb quality, but with bad pocket design. I've used this pack for nearly four years now. It's my everyday pack for work as well as long day hikes.   Comfort and Suspension: The suspension system is unbelievable, and even in its maximum load, it makes the weight disappear. I can snugly fit the pack to my back, thus it eliminates any momentum while moving. I experienced no hot spots or too much friction on the waist belt. It's relatively ventilated… Full review

rated 4.5 of 5 stars
Mystery Ranch Forager Hip Pack

A well made, nice sized pack for everyday and shorter outings. Now that I'm retired I find myself hiking the myriad of single-track trails we have close by daily.   I was carrying a 20 oz handle water bottle and nothing else. I'm pretty dialed in to the weather and what to wear, but would sometimes find I wished I had brought gloves or a beanie or a windshirt or a little more water or a snack, etc. I've got a few day packs that would certainly work, but was looking for something smaller. Enter… Full review

rated 4.5 of 5 stars
Nittany Mountain Works Cordura Ditty Bag

This little itty bitty Ditty Bag makes for a useful and sturdy extra pouch for organizing things. Two different sizes and a WIIIIIIIDE spectrum of color options (190 different possible options) meets the needs and desires of many. No frills, just a pouch made of strong materials and a burly zipper. Usage: I’ve used the Cordura Ditty Bag from Nittany Mountain Works for about a year now and find myself wanting (and soon getting) more of them. Initially used to store keys, phone, and wallet in one… Full review