Backpacks

The best backpacks, reviewed and curated by the Trailspace community. The latest review was added on January 16, 2019. Stores' prices and availability are updated daily.

Whether you’re setting off on an alpine climb, afternoon trail run, or extended thru hike, you need a pack to carry your outdoor gear and essentials while on the go.

Below you'll find our top picks for the best backpacks for hiking, backpacking, climbing, mountaineering, trail running, and more, thanks to hundreds of independent reviews by real hikers, backpackers, alpinists, and other outdoor enthusiasts.

From field-tested ultralight packs to load haulers to kid carriers to hydration packs, our reviewers have shared their real-world experience to help you select an appropriate, dependable backpack for your next outdoor adventure. Find your pack. Pack your gear. Head out.

Learn more about how to choose a backpack below »

Recent Backpack Reviews

Rivendell Mountain Works Jensen

rated 5 of 5 stars Great design and great construction. Got one of Eric Hardee's current-version Jensens about four years ago. Stupendous pack for backcountry hut touring on skis. The weight stays close to the back (have not experienced a better pack in that regard), and capacity is perfect for about four nights out with no tent and with a light sleeping bag. I do have the optional snap-on side pockets and wouldn't be able to make those trips work without them. Full review

Rivendell Mountain Works Jensen

rated 4 of 5 stars An aesthetically delightful and comfortable specialty pack for shorter trips in mild weather for the purists. Utterly miserable if pushed beyond its weight/capacity limits. Like the previous reviewer, I lusted after the Rivendell Jensen pack when I was a poor graduate student in the '70s. By the time I could afford that, it was long out of production. Fast forward 40 years, after a very long search I bought a 1970s Jensen pack on eBay. It is the original version with two zippers opening the top… Full review

ULA Equipment Circuit

rated 5 of 5 stars This pack works for everything. It is the most comfortable pack I have ever used. It has good pockets on the waist belt, good pockets for water bottle that can be reached with the pack on, and an outside pocket for food items and a jacket. I rarely have to open the pack to get what I want from it. I used to carry packs to haul equipment, external frames for long overnight trips, ski packs, day packs, and a hunting pack. Now I just use the Circuit for everything. They come in different torso lengths… Full review

Cotopaxi Luzon 18

rated 3.5 of 5 stars Minimalist, single compartment pack with features that promote function and comfort. Outer zipped pocket and internal hydration sleeve with a drawstring top. Makes a great day or summit pack, but enough room for UL overnights. Specs: Capacity: 18L Weight: 11.5oz/327g Bag Material: Ripstop nylon Fit, Comfort, & Ride: The Cotopaxi Luzon 18L is a small pack that rides well on the upper middle portion of my back. I have an oddly long 21" torso for a man of average height and I find the bottom of… Full review

Kelty Super Tioga 4900

rated 4.5 of 5 stars Ageless. I purchased this in 2002 from Sierra Trading Post and it has gotten moderate use for the last 16 years doing hikes in the area's National Forest. This has never let me down and is still in excellent condition. The only negative I have to say about this is that it is so huge that I would tend to overpack with too many unnecessary items. The frame is adjustable and I had it set to the shortest adjustment as possible and it fit my 5'7" frame just about perfectly. As I aged so did my spine… Full review

Osprey Kamber 22

rated 5 of 5 stars Excellent winter pack for day trips, made with very useful and safety conscious features. I bought this for winter hiking and snowshoeing, particularly for carrying snowshoes when not being used. I found it very easy to load or unload the snowshoes without having to remove mitts. The strap system on the pack is just perfect for this, and tucks out of the way when not needed. The pack is made to be very water resistant and lives up to this. It's a panel design with one larger compartment with a divider… Full review

Osprey Atmos AG 50

rated 5 of 5 stars A great pack, with a perfect suspension. Carries weight with ease. Mesh back panel dumps heat in warm and hot conditions. A great weekend pack, perfect for three days, two nights. Lots of storage and ease of access. A main compartment, a sleeping bag compartment, and for on-the-go access, it has two lid, two hip belt, one large stash, and two water bottle pockets.  The only complaint with my older version is a lack of sleeping bag compartment straps; they were added on the newer model. Materials… Full review

Outdoor Research HydroLite Pack Sacks

rated 3 of 5 stars The Outdoor Research stuff sack is a compact and lightweight insurance bag against weather in moist or wet conditions. OR does a fine job of considering the finer details of functionality in this well rounded tote. The waterproofing tends to separate from the material especially at the seams. The Hydrolite pack sack is a water resistant bag as opposed to a waterproof bag. It is not meant to withstand full or partial water submersion like a dry bag. The bag does keep things dry if left out in the… Full review

U.S. Military ILBE Pack

rated 4 of 5 stars Comparison of the USMC ILBE vs Eberlestock v90 Battleship backpacks with the focus on winter camping usage. For Winter Camping and Expeditions you need a really HUGE backpack. I own both the Eberlestock v90 Battleship and a USMC ILBE pack. I shall compare and contrast these with emphasis on winter camping. Both packs have online reviews on military use, hunting, and expeditions. Both packs have good reviews on TRAILSPACE. Battleship frontBattleship side Battleship Camo The Eberlestock v90 Battleship… Full review

user rating: 5 of 5 (10)
ULA Equipment Catalyst Expedition
$250
user rating: 5 of 5 (7)
CamelBak Cloud Walker Hydration Pack
$84 - $85
user rating: 5 of 5 (6)
The North Face Terra 40 Overnight
$112 - $149
user rating: 5 of 5 (6)
ULA Equipment Ohm 2.0 Weekend
$200
user rating: 5 of 5 (5)
Osprey Talon 11 Daypack
$63 - $100
user rating: 5 of 5 (4)
Granite Gear Round Rock Solid Compression Sack
$20 - $34
user rating: 5 of 5 (4)
Patagonia Atom Daypack
$59 - $79
user rating: 5 of 5 (4)
Equinox Katahdin Weekend
$117
user rating: 5 of 5 (4)
Sea to Summit Ultra-Sil Pack Cover Pack Cover
$25 - $41
user rating: 5 of 5 (4)
Deuter Kid Comfort II Child Carrier
$210 - $250
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Patagonia Black Hole Duffel Pack Duffel
$119 - $169
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Hyperlite Mountain Gear 2400 Southwest Overnight
$310
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Deuter Trans Alpine 30 Daypack
$130
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
SealLine Pro Portage Pack Dry Pack
$120 - $199
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Gregory Miwok 18 Daypack
$60 - $99
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Deuter ACT Trail 24 Daypack
$90 - $120
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Osprey Sirrus 24 Daypack
$130
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Mountainsmith Lariat 65 Weekend
$172 - $183
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
REI Trail 40 Overnight
$119
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Hyperlite Mountain Gear 3400 Porter Weekend
$345
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Ultimate Direction PB Adventure Vest Hydration Pack
$95 - $169
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Osprey Aura AG 50 Weekend
$172 - $240
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (51)
Osprey Aether 70 Weekend
$199 - $216
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (24)
Osprey Aether 60 Weekend
$130
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (23)
Osprey Exos 58 Weekend
$220
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (19)
Osprey Talon 44 Overnight
$160
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (18)
CamelBak M.U.L.E. Hydration Pack
$65 - $110
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (17)
Deuter ACT Lite 65+10 Weekend
$209
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (16)
Osprey Kestrel 48 Overnight
$100 - $180
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (16)
Deuter Aircontact 75+10 Expedition
$180 - $310
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (15)
CamelBak Rim Runner Hydration Pack
$84 - $104
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (14)
ULA Equipment Circuit Weekend
$225
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (14)
Osprey Talon 22 Daypack
$82 - $110
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (13)
Gregory Baltoro 65 Weekend
$199 - $299
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (13)
REI Flash 18 Daypack
$40
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (12)
Mountainsmith Day Lumbar/Hip Pack
$72 - $89
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (11)
Osprey Volt 60 Weekend
$135 - $180
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (11)
Sea to Summit eVent Compression Dry Sack Dry Bag / Compression Sack
$24 - $49
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (11)
Mountainsmith Tour Lumbar/Hip Pack
$50 - $79
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (10)
Osprey Kestrel 38 Overnight
$96 - $160
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (8)
The North Face Terra 65 Weekend
$125 - $179
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Osprey UL Raincover Pack Cover
$30 - $40
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Granite Gear Nimbus Trace Access 70 Weekend
$175 - $206
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Kelty Redwing 32 Daypack
$70 - $99
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Hyperlite Mountain Gear 3400 Windrider Weekend
$345
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Deuter Futura Pro 34 SL Overnight
$159 - $170
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Osprey Xena 85 Expedition
$380
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Matador Daylite16 Daypack
$50
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Fjallraven Kajka 75 Weekend
$400
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Mystery Ranch Glacier Weekend
$150 - $350
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How to Choose a Backpack

Like most outdoor gear, choosing the right backpack depends on how you plan to use it and selecting one that fits you, your needs, your budget, and your gear.

Capacity (or How Big?)

Consider the following questions to help determine capacity, or how big of a pack you really need.

  • How long are you heading out for: a day, an overnight, a week?
  • What's your outdoor style? Are you a minimalist, or deeply attached to creature comforts, or somewhere in between?
  • How much and what gear will you bring for specific trips and activities? Don't forget group gear and seasonal items (for example: winter gear will take up more room).

Pack Sizes

Obviously you need a backpack that fits all your gear. If possible, lay it all out, including food and water, and be honest about what you'll need to fit in your pack.

Backpack sizing varies between individuals and manufacturers, but the following ranges are a basic starting point:

  • Day Pack:
    less than 2,000 cubic inches
    up to 30 liters
  • Overnight:
    2,000 - 2,999 cubic inches
    30-50 liters
  • Weekend and Multi-Day:
    3,000 - 4,499 cubic inches
    50-73 liters
  • Week-Long and Expedition:
    4,500+ cubic inches
    74 liters and up

Pack Tip: Don't buy a backpack bigger than you need. You'll be tempted to fill it and carry more than necessary, or you'll end up with an annoying floppy, half-filled pack.

Fit (Is It Comfy?)

Nothing beats the expertise of a knowledgeable pack fitter. Find one at your local outdoor retailer. In the meantime, here are some additional tips to help you choose a backpack that fits you well.

Torso Length

Size a backpack to your torso length. Don't assume you need the tall (or the regular or the short) model based on your height. The sizes of different manufacturers' frames may correspond to different torso lengths. Check each pack's technical specifications.

To find your torso length, have someone measure from the iliac crest at the top of your hipbone to the prominent bone at the base of your neck (the seventh cervical vertebrae). (See how to properly fit a backpack in this instructional video.)

Pack Gender

Many pack manufacturers produce women-specific or short torso versions. Women, kids, and others with short torsos can consider backpacks sized for them. On average, these fit the average woman better.

Pack Tip: Don't get stuck on a pack's gender though. Buy the one that fits you best.

Straps and Padding

Shoulder straps, which control the fit of the suspension system, should be well padded and adjustable.

An adjustable sternum strap, which connects the shoulder straps, helps bring the load weight forward and off your shoulders.

Since it supports your pack's weight, make sure the hipbelt provides adequate padding. Some pack makers offer interchangeable hipbelts in different styles and in sizes for both men and women for a better individual fit.

Load

Fitting your gear in the pack is one thing. Making sure it rides comfortably is another. What's the typical weight of your gear? Check that it matches the manufacturer's recommendation, particularly if you're opting for an ultralight pack.

During a fitting, load the pack with weight to see how well it carries. Walk around with the loaded pack, practice taking it on and off, move around, and climb up and down stairs and slopes.

How well is the pack's load distributed? Does it remain comfortable over its carrying capacity and intended uses? Does it feel stable?

 

Features & Organization

Consider the pack's organization. Is equipment stowed securely? Is it easy to access? Intuitive?

If you'll be carrying any specialty gear, such as ice axes, snowshoes, skis, or a snowboard, look for a pack with features or accessories designed to hold those items, rather than trying to jury-rig them on later.

Depending on your different activities you may need more than one backpack, perhaps a large internal frame pack for multi-day backpacking trips and a small daypack for day hikes.

Find the best pack for you and your activities and you'll be ready to hit the trail.