Tents and Shelters

Ready for a night out? Whether you’re an ultralight alpinist, family of backpackers, devoted hanger, or comfort camper, you'll find the best tents, tarps, and hammocks for your outdoor overnights right here.

Check out our top picks below—including price comparisons—to shelter you in any terrain, trip, or season: winter mountaineering, three-season thru-hiking, warm weather car camping, hammock hanging, alpine bivys, tarps, and emergency shelter.

Or you can browse our thousands of independent tent and shelter ratings and reviews by product type, brand, or price. Written by real-world hikers, backpackers, alpinists, climbers, and paddlers, Trailspace community reviews will help you select a dependable, field-tested, outdoor abode just right for your next adventure.

Learn more about choosing tents and shelters below »

The best tents and shelters, reviewed and curated by the Trailspace community. The latest review was added on June 25, 2019. Stores' prices and availability are updated daily.

Recent Tent/Shelter Reviews

Gossamer Gear The One

rated 5 of 5 stars The One tent from Gossamer Gear met all of my expectations for a solo tent. I found it to be easy to set up, comfortable to be in, and lightweight. It has all the headroom and storage space I need, and I liked the open views and ventilation from the front. Gossamer Gear’s The One tent is a one-person tent that hits all of my requirements in one small package. I’m picky about one-person tents, more so than with a two-person tent. Most two-person tents I’ve tested inherently feel bigger and… Full review

Eureka! Wind River 2

rated 4 of 5 stars I inherited this tent from my brother, who I remember loved it. Can anyone provide what size poles are required for the tent?  I have the tent and fly, which are both in great shape, but no poles! Thanks for any help. David Full review

REI Kingdom 8 Tent

rated 4 of 5 stars This tent has been very reliable, but watch out for the wind. I have been using this tent for about three years now. My kids love it because there is so much room in it. I usually take it out one-on-one with each of my kids so we have room to spare. We are able to set it up with just two people unless it is windy. My biggest problem with the tent is that it is like a giant sail in the wind. You need to tie it down thoroughly. Even with it tied down I now have poles that are bent. Nothing has broken… Full review

YAMA Mountain Gear Swiftline 2P

rated 4.5 of 5 stars Great shelter with plenty of space. Unique pitching options. For the size and weight of this shelter you really can't beat it. A palace for one and will accommodate two people as well. I finally found my balance. I've been lighting up my pack weight for the past few years now. Sometimes this meant adding and removing gear to get where I wanted to be in terms of my hiking style and needs. Gen of Yama Mountian Gear has created this balance in the Swiftline 2p Shelter. The space, function, and ease… Full review

Ozark Trail 12' x 10' Family Dome Tent

rated 5 of 5 stars CAN ANYONE PLEASE TELL ME THE POLE LENGTHS!?! We have had this tent as long as I can remember and I'm 31 now! I just took it out to take my son camping and can't find the poles! I'm heartbroken and don't have the money to get another one this size! If you can PLEASE e-mail me alisonratliff1@gmail.com the pole sizes I would appreciate it SO MUCH! Thank you! Full review

VauDe Taurus UL 2P

rated 4.5 of 5 stars Made with typical German quality, a sturdy two-person tent with reasonable space for living in comfort. Stood up to poor weather and great for the British climate as it pitches flysheet first. The Vaude Taurus II UL is great for two people and luxurious for one. It is smaller and lighter than the Marmot Limelight I have used for several years. Though I loved that tent, it was getting too heavy and bulky for my creaking back. We chose the Vaude Taurus because one person does not need to climb over… Full review

REI Kingdom 8 Tent

rated 5 of 5 stars My family has been enjoying this tent for the last few years. It is super easy to set up and it goes up quickly. My family and I love this tent, we have used it for the last three years and couldn't be happier. We had been torn between this tent and another eight-person tent and aside from the cheaper price we were sold on the double strap making it able to be worn like a backpack when carrying it. We've used it in the rain and have stayed bone dry. With the included rain fly it goes on easy, keeps… Full review

ALPS Mountaineering Chaos 3

rated 5 of 5 stars It's very rain resistant when the fly is up and has a bathtub floor. Durable... I've used this dozens of times in all four seasons. Takes about 5-7 minutes for one person to set up. Easy to disassemble as well. Double access points on either side (no crawling over tent mate). Has two large vestibules for boots and gear. I bought this tent new in 2011. It has been in Eastern Oregon in winter rain, in Modoc County during a fluke early ice storm in the fall, in the Sierras on numerous occasions during… Full review

GoLite Hex 3 Shelter

rated 4.5 of 5 stars I use this on short duration backpacking trips and it is great for two people or one person and a bike/dog. Combine with the matching nest and it is excellent in buggy climes. I use it mostly without the nest. I love this tee-pee (single pole) design over the dome type tents. I've had this tent for a number of years and among the dozen tents I own it is still my favorite. Best combination of space and lightweight. In buggy areas the Nest (bug net and floor) are a good idea. I mostly use it in fall/winter… Full review

user rating: 5 of 5 (109)
Eagles Nest Outfitters DoubleNest Hammock
$30 - $709
user rating: 5 of 5 (17)
Eagles Nest Outfitters Atlas Straps Hammock Accessory
$17 - $29
user rating: 5 of 5 (11)
MSR Hubba Hubba NX 2P Three-Season
$338 - $449
user rating: 5 of 5 (10)
Hilleberg Nallo 2 Four-Season
$775 - $880
user rating: 5 of 5 (8)
Hilleberg Soulo Four-Season
$735
user rating: 5 of 5 (7)
Hilleberg Nammatj 3 GT Four-Season
$1,090
user rating: 5 of 5 (6)
Kodiak Canvas 10x10 Flex-Bow Canvas Tent Deluxe Four-Season
$550 - $649
user rating: 5 of 5 (6)
Marmot Limelight 4P Three-Season
$284 - $379
user rating: 5 of 5 (6)
Grand Trunk Double Parachute Nylon Hammock Hammock
$18 - $74
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
EMS Velocity 1 Tent Three-Season
$269
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Black Diamond Mega Light Tarp/Shelter
$240 - $319
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
MSR Elixir 3 Three-Season
$225 - $299
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Hilleberg Kaitum 2 Four-Season
$970 - $1,120
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Hilleberg Nallo 3 GT Four-Season
$935
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Marmot Tungsten 1P Three-Season
$134 - $179
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (32)
Eagles Nest Outfitters SingleNest Hammock
$25 - $59
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (31)
Eureka! Apex 2XT Three-Season
$85 - $139
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (28)
Mountain Hardwear Trango 2 Four-Season
$488 - $700
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (24)
Eureka! Timberline 2 Three-Season
$152 - $164
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (23)
Marmot Limelight 3P Three-Season
$199 - $299
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (23)
Eureka! K-2 XT Four-Season
$400 - $499
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (22)
Eureka! Alpenlite XT Four-Season
$280 - $369
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (22)
The North Face Mountain 25 Four-Season
$589 - $689
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (21)
Kelty Gunnison 2 Three-Season
$165 - $189
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (21)
Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2 Three-Season
$262 - $299
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (20)
Hilleberg Akto Four-Season
$575
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (20)
Kelty Grand Mesa 2 Three-Season
$98 - $229
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (19)
REI Half Dome 2 Plus Three-Season
$229
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (19)
Kelty Noah's Tarp 12 Tarp/Shelter
$48 - $99
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (18)
Hennessy Hammock Expedition Asym Hammock
$220
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (17)
Eureka! Timberline 4 Three-Season
$185 - $191
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (15)
ALPS Mountaineering Zephyr 2 Three-Season
$140 - $219
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (15)
Hennessy Hammock Ultralight Backpacker Asym Hammock
$230
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (15)
Big Agnes Copper Spur UL3 Three-Season
$337 - $449
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (14)
NEMO Losi 3P Three-Season
$300 - $399
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (14)
MSR Groundhog Tent Stakes Stake
$3 - $19
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (12)
Big Agnes Copper Spur UL2 Three-Season
$285 - $379
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (12)
Eagles Nest Outfitters Guardian Bug Net Hammock Accessory
$45 - $59
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (10)
Kelty Noah's Tarp 9 Tarp/Shelter
$42 - $59
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (10)
Eureka! Timberline SQ Outfitter 6 Three-Season
$460 - $492
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (10)
Eureka! Assault Outfitter 4 Four-Season
$380 - $407
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (9)
Kelty Salida 2 Three-Season
$120 - $149
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (9)
ALPS Mountaineering Chaos 3 Three-Season
$154 - $289
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (9)
Mountain Hardwear Viperine 2 Three-Season
$180 - $223
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (9)
REI Camp Dome 2 Three-Season
$100
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (8)
REI Kingdom 6 Tent
$469
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (8)
Big Agnes Big House 4 Three-Season
$150 - $299
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (8)
Kelty Gunnison 4 Three-Season
$280
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (8)
Big Agnes Seedhouse 2 Three-Season
$240
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (8)
REI Quarter Dome 2 Three-Season
$244
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What’s the “best” tent or shelter for you? Consider your personal outdoor needs, preferences, and budget:

  • Conditions:
    First, and most important, in what seasons, conditions, and terrain will you use your tent, tarp, or hammock? Choose a shelter that can handle the conditions you expect to encounter (rain, snow, wind, heat, humidity, biting insects, an energetic scout troop), but don’t buy more tent than you truly need, and don’t expect one tent to do it all.
  • Capacity:
    Tents are typically classified by sleeping capacity (i.e. one-person, two-person, etc). However, a tent's stated sleeping capacity usually does not include much (or any) space for your gear and there’s no sizing standard between tent manufacturers. Some users size up.
  • Livability:
    Will you use the tent as a basecamp or is it an emergency shelter only? To determine if you and your gear will fit, look at the shelter’s dimensions, including floor and vestibule square areas, height and headroom (including at the sides), plus the number and placement of doors, gear lofts, and pockets, to assess personal livability, comfort, and footprint.
  • Weight and Packed Size:
    If you’ll be backpacking, climbing, cycling, or otherwise carrying that shelter, consider its weight, packed size (and your pack it needs to fit in), and its space-to-weight ratio before automatically opting for the bigger tent. Paddlers and car campers have more room to work with, but everyone should consider how the tent and its parts pack up for stowage.
  • Design:
    Tents come in various designs. Freestanding tents can stand alone without stakes or guy lines and can be easily moved or have dirt and other debris shaken out without being disassembled, though they still need to be staked out. Rounded, geodesic domes are stable and able to withstand heavy snow loads and wind. Tunnel tents are narrow and rectangular, and large family cabin tents are best for warm-weather campground outings.
  • Other features and specs to consider include single versus double-wall, ease of setup, stability, weather resistance, ventilation, , and any noteworthy features.
  • Read more in our guide to tents.