Tents and Shelters

The best tents and shelters, reviewed and curated by the Trailspace community. The latest review was added on May 11, 2019. Stores' prices and availability are updated daily.

Ready for a night out? Whether you’re an ultralight alpinist, family of backpackers, devoted hanger, or comfort camper, you'll find the best tents, tarps, and hammocks for your outdoor overnights right here.

Check out our top picks below—including price comparisons—to shelter you in any terrain, trip, or season: winter mountaineering, three-season thru-hiking, warm weather car camping, hammock hanging, alpine bivys, tarps, and emergency shelter.

Or you can browse our thousands of independent tent and shelter ratings and reviews by product type, brand, or price. Written by real-world hikers, backpackers, alpinists, climbers, and paddlers, Trailspace community reviews will help you select a dependable, field-tested, outdoor abode just right for your next adventure.

Learn more about how to choose a tent/shelter below »

Recent Tent/Shelter Reviews

Eureka! Tetragon 8

rated 3 of 5 stars Great tent if you're not walking far... I got this tent for about $199.99 CAD on sale plus tax between 2015-2016, and it was marked down 75 percent on Clearance. I am saying this because I look up to the other comments of under $100 and the MSRP listed of $139.99 (I think it isn't shown on this page). Even if that is USD I still paid way more than everyone else. Either tariffs are high on camping gear from the US or I should have done my research. Either way I am not so much disappointed as it is… Full review

Wenzel StarLite

rated 5 of 5 stars You MUST seal the seams. This is 100% mandatory. Also it may be favorable to use a light "cover" or bivy sack inside the tent, as would as a matter of course when using a tarp for many. I've used this specific product for four nights, one of which produced light rain. I used a highly similar product years ago, for more than 100 nights over a period of several years. In a nor'easter in Nova Scotia once, the previous product leaked. In a heavy, wet and foggy April snowstorm in New York, melting snow… Full review

Hilleberg Akto

rated 3.5 of 5 stars A good tent for long-distance walking trips. I find the Akto easy to pitch, even in high winds. Very stable and strong. I take the extra pole in snow, but I've never needed it as the tent can take a load on top without trouble. Very easy to adjust. A wee bit clammy, but I leave the end vents open winter and summer and it's not so bad. I love the big porch and I invested in the footprint, which pitches with the tent, and doesn't add too much more weight for the value of getting gear off the wet ground. Full review

Naturehike Cloud UP 2

rated 5 of 5 stars This tent is very cheap priced, but don't let that fool you in quality. Naturehike makes the best cheap 1-2 man tents for backpacking. They are very light, durable. I have used the Naturehike Cloud Up 2 for every hiking trip I have ever done. The tent has YKK zippers and does not leak even in a heavy downpour. It comes with very strong aluminium stakes and all the guy lines are reflective so you can see them easily in the dark. It is easily taken down while staying dry. The tent I have is getting… Full review

Tarptent StratoSpire 2

rated 5 of 5 stars Lightweight, very sturdy, and roomy. Awesome tent. We have the fabric inner and the tent weighs about 2 3/4 pounds. It is incredibly sturdy and uses robust fabrics. Compare this tent to flimsy, for example, Big Agnes tents that use thin poles and thin/fragile fabrics and there is no comparison. Because the tent uses trekking poles it is incredibly sturdy. And, the floor of the tent actually measures as wide as the manufacturers spec (52"). Most tent companies exaggerate the dimensions of the tent… Full review

MSR FreeLite 1

rated 3.5 of 5 stars Excellent lightweight one-person tent for backpacking. While not spacious, it gets the job done, dries quickly, and weighs very little. This tent is easy to pitch if it isn't too windy. There is one pole set which connects to the main tent body. Overall, it can be pitched as quick as any other one-person tent. As far as stability, I wouldn't want to use this in a windy situation. There aren't enough tie downs for the tent fly and it is nearly impossible to get it truly taut so it ends up flapping… Full review

Coleman Sundome 4

rated 4.5 of 5 stars Holds up to wind. Nice size. Full review

Timber Top Tent

rated 5 of 5 stars Received this tent as a gift from my parents in the early 1990's. Still use it today on every camping trip. Hi all, I received this tent way back in the early 1990's as a Christmas present from my parents (purchased from Service Merchandise). It was my first tent and still is my only tent. I use it every time we go on a camping vacation, which is at least 2-3 times a year. My kids, while they choose to sleep in their hammocks mostly, do end up in the tent with me when it gets too cold or in a rainstorm. Full review

MSR Hubba Hubba NX 2P

rated 4.5 of 5 stars Very lightweight. Best for hiking. I would recommend it. Quick setup. Haven't used a footprint, but I don't usually and it has been fine.  If properly pegged out is pretty stable in the wind. Not good for snow. Lightweight fly as well so mine eventually got a few rips in it, but has been great for years now.  Good ventilation, especially with the optional pushout of little arm with velcro. Lots of room for one person how I usually go, but with both vestibules lots of room for two.  Packs small. Full review

user rating: 5 of 5 (109)
Eagles Nest Outfitters DoubleNest Hammock
$52 - $709
user rating: 5 of 5 (17)
Eagles Nest Outfitters Atlas Straps Hammock Accessory
$22 - $29
user rating: 5 of 5 (11)
MSR Hubba Hubba NX 2P Three-Season
$320 - $449
user rating: 5 of 5 (10)
Hilleberg Nallo 2 Four-Season
$775 - $880
user rating: 5 of 5 (8)
Hilleberg Soulo Four-Season
$735
user rating: 5 of 5 (7)
Hilleberg Nammatj 3 GT Four-Season
$1,090
user rating: 5 of 5 (6)
Kodiak Canvas 10x10 Flex-Bow Canvas Tent Deluxe Four-Season
$550 - $569
user rating: 5 of 5 (6)
Marmot Limelight 4P Three-Season
$265 - $379
user rating: 5 of 5 (6)
Grand Trunk Double Parachute Nylon Hammock Hammock
$45 - $74
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
EMS Velocity 1 Tent Three-Season
$269
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Black Diamond Mega Light Tarp/Shelter
$240 - $319
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
MSR Elixir 3 Three-Season
$225 - $299
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Hilleberg Kaitum 2 Four-Season
$970 - $1,120
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Hilleberg Nallo 3 GT Four-Season
$935
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Marmot Tungsten 1P Three-Season
$134 - $179
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (32)
Eagles Nest Outfitters SingleNest Hammock
$37 - $59
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (31)
Eureka! Apex 2XT Three-Season
$85 - $139
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (28)
Mountain Hardwear Trango 2 Four-Season
$560 - $650
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (24)
Eureka! Timberline 2 Three-Season
$152
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (23)
Marmot Limelight 3P Three-Season
$224 - $299
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (23)
Eureka! K-2 XT Four-Season
$400 - $499
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (22)
Eureka! Alpenlite XT Four-Season
$300 - $369
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (22)
The North Face Mountain 25 Four-Season
$589 - $689
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (21)
Kelty Gunnison 2 Three-Season
$142 - $189
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (21)
Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2 Three-Season
$262 - $349
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (20)
Hilleberg Akto Four-Season
$575
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (20)
Kelty Grand Mesa 2 Three-Season
$112 - $172
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (19)
REI Half Dome 2 Plus Three-Season
$160
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (19)
Kelty Noah's Tarp 12 Tarp/Shelter
$51 - $89
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (18)
Hennessy Hammock Expedition Asym Hammock
$136 - $220
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (17)
Eureka! Timberline 4 Three-Season
$192 - $194
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (15)
ALPS Mountaineering Zephyr 2 Three-Season
$138 - $219
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (15)
Hennessy Hammock Ultralight Backpacker Asym Hammock
$230
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (15)
Big Agnes Copper Spur UL3 Three-Season
$337 - $449
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (14)
NEMO Losi 3P Three-Season
$300 - $399
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (14)
MSR Groundhog Tent Stakes Stake
$2 - $19
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (12)
Big Agnes Copper Spur UL2 Three-Season
$285 - $379
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (12)
Eagles Nest Outfitters Guardian Bug Net Hammock Accessory
$45 - $59
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (10)
Kelty Noah's Tarp 9 Tarp/Shelter
$45 - $59
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (10)
Eureka! Timberline SQ Outfitter 6 Three-Season
$464
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (10)
Eureka! Assault Outfitter 4 Four-Season
$384 - $394
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (9)
Kelty Salida 2 Three-Season
$150
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (9)
Mountain Hardwear Viperine 2 Three-Season
$180 - $223
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (9)
REI Camp Dome 2 Three-Season
$100
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (8)
REI Kingdom 6 Tent
$285 - $320
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (8)
Big Agnes Big House 4 Three-Season
$225 - $299
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (8)
Kelty Gunnison 4 Three-Season
$209 - $279
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (8)
REI Quarter Dome 2 Three-Season
$349
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (8)
NEMO Losi 2P Three-Season
$247 - $329
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Hyperlite Mountain Gear Flat Tarp Tarp/Shelter
$355
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What’s the “best” tent or shelter for you? Consider your personal outdoor needs, preferences, and budget:

  • Conditions:
    First, and most important, in what seasons, conditions, and terrain will you use your tent, tarp, or hammock? Choose a shelter that can handle the conditions you expect to encounter (rain, snow, wind, heat, humidity, biting insects, an energetic scout troop), but don’t buy more tent than you truly need, and don’t expect one tent to do it all.
  • Capacity:
    Tents are typically classified by sleeping capacity (i.e. one-person, two-person, etc). However, a tent's stated sleeping capacity usually does not include much (or any) space for your gear and there’s no sizing standard between tent manufacturers. Some users size up.
  • Livability:
    Will you use the tent as a basecamp or is it an emergency shelter only? To determine if you and your gear will fit, look at the shelter’s dimensions, including floor and vestibule square areas, height and headroom (including at the sides), plus the number and placement of doors, gear lofts, and pockets, to assess personal livability, comfort, and footprint.
  • Weight and Packed Size:
    If you’ll be backpacking, climbing, cycling, or otherwise carrying that shelter, consider its weight, packed size (and your pack it needs to fit in), and its space-to-weight ratio before automatically opting for the bigger tent. Paddlers and car campers have more room to work with, but everyone should consider how the tent and its parts pack up for stowage.
  • Design:
    Tents come in various designs. Freestanding tents can stand alone without stakes or guy lines and can be easily moved or have dirt and other debris shaken out without being disassembled, though they still need to be staked out. Rounded, geodesic domes are stable and able to withstand heavy snow loads and wind. Tunnel tents are narrow and rectangular, and large family cabin tents are best for warm-weather campground outings.
  • Other features and specs to consider include single versus double-wall, ease of setup, stability, weather resistance, ventilation, , and any noteworthy features.
  • Read more in our guide to tents.