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Sandals

The best sandals, reviewed and curated by the Trailspace community. The latest review was added on July 26, 2021. Stores' prices and availability are updated daily.

user rating: 5 of 5 (5)
Chaco ZX/2 Unaweep Sport Sandal
$60 - $100
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Chaco Zong Sport Sandal
$110
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Chaco Flip Flip-Flop
$68
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (24)
Chaco Z/2 Unaweep Sport Sandal
$52 - $82
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Keen Bali Flip-Flop
$79
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Teva Tirra Sport Sandal
$24 - $174
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (6)
Teva Hurricane XLT Sport Sandal
$69
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (2)
Keen Clearwater CNX Sport Sandal
$75 - $129
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (2)
Chaco Z/Volv 2 Sport Sandal
$100
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (2)
OluKai Hokua Flip-Flop
$75
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Chaco Z/Volv Sport Sandal
$50 - $99
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Ecco Yucatan Sandals Sport Sandal
$135
user rating: 4 of 5 (23)
Keen Newport H2 Sport Sandal
$31 - $110
user rating: 4 of 5 (6)
Keen Newport Sport Sandal
$120 - $129
user rating: 4 of 5 (3)
Teva Original Universal Sport Sandal
$35 - $55
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
Astral Filipe Flip-Flop
$75
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
Keen Zerraport II Sport Sandal
$70 - $110
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
Chaco Z/Cloud Sport Sandal
$43 - $139
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
Keen Solr Sandal Sport Sandal
$80 - $110
user rating: 4 of 5 (2)
Chaco Z/1 Classic Sport Sandal
$36 - $129
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Chaco Z/Cloud 2 Sport Sandal
$45 - $139
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Oboz Campster Sport Sandal
$45 - $49
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
L.L.Bean Explorer Sandals
$79
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (1)
Chaco Lowdown Sandal Sport Sandal
$50 - $85
OOFOS OOahh Sport Slide Sandal Sport Sandal
$60
user rating: 3 of 5 (2)
Teva Terra Fi Lite Sport Sandal
$40
OOFOS OOriginal Sport Sandal Flip-Flop
$60
OOFOS OOriginal Sandal Flip-Flop
$50
OOFOS OOahh Slide Sandal Sport Sandal
$50 - $64
OOFOS OOlala Sandal Flip-Flop
$60 - $64
user rating: 1.5 of 5 (3)
Keen Uneek Sport Sandal
$35 - $169
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Teva Torin Sandals Sport Sandal
$40 MSRP
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (14)
Chaco Z/1 Unaweep Sport Sandal
$100 MSRP
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Montrail Molokai Flip-Flop
$55 MSRP
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Teva Mush Flip-Flop
$24 MSRP
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Xero Shoes DIY 4mm Kit Sport Sandal / Barefoot / Minimal
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (3)
Source Classic Sport Sandal
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Bedrock Sandals Cairn 3D Sport Sandal
$110 MSRP
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Chaco Z/1 Pro Sport Sandal
$110 MSRP
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Luna Sandals Origen 2.0 Sport Sandal
$110 MSRP
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Teva Katavi Sport Sandal
$60 MSRP
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
TrekSta Kisatchie Sport Sandal
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Source Djibouti Flip-Flop
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
New Balance Minimus Vibram Sandal Sport Sandal
$75 MSRP
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
Teva Toachi 2 Sport Sandal
$90 MSRP
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
Sazzi Digit Sport Sandal
$100 MSRP
user rating: 4 of 5 (2)
Xero Shoes Invisible Shoes 6mm Contact Sport Sandal / Barefoot / Minimal
user rating: 4 of 5 (2)
Bokos Sandals Flip-Flop
$16 MSRP

Recent Sandal Reviews

rated 4.5 of 5 stars
Chaco Z/Cloud

This is Chaco’s original Z-1 Classic with a softer footbed. The sole is pretty good on both trails and wet rocks; the softer, more grippy rubber shows some wear over time. Good support and comfort for a sport sandal. This is one of my go-to sandals for walking on trails and the beach as well as on canoes and around the water. I have been wearing Chaco sandals for nearly fifteen years, still have a pair of their Z/1 Classics; I picked up the Z/Clouds about three years ago as a more forgiving alternative. Full review

rated 4.5 of 5 stars
Keen Zerraport II

Water shoe with great drainage and Keen’s well-known toe protection. I like Keens around boats and rocks because they keep my toes from getting mashed. This one has the added benefit of siped soles, good traction, and an open design that dries quickly. The midsole/sole is also thick enough for moderate hiking. Adjustability of straps is kind of limited. Keen‘s Zerraport II is a successor to their Zerraport, which in turn is a successor to the long-discontinued hydro guide. https://www.trailspace.com/gear/keen/hydro-guide/… Full review

rated 4.5 of 5 stars
Bedrock Sandals Cairn Pro II

The Bedrock Cairn Pro II allows adventurers to equip themselves with a quality sandal that’ll stand up to nearly any condition. With adjustable features and great color options, it’s easy to appreciate the supportive and eye-catching build of this product. MSRP: $120 Weight: About 9 ounces Color: 7 options Bedrock Cairn Pro II I’ve been lucky enough to own Bedrock sandals, Chaco sandals, Shamma Sandals, and Teva sandals. Each brand has strengths and weaknesses in the outdoors. But Bedrock’s… Full review

rated 4 of 5 stars
Teva Original Universal

I bought these in the late 1990s. I moved to Texas and I wanted a breathable footwear for school and for water sports. I purchased these and I have used them in every creek and stream in and around water in Texas. I am doing the same thing in any water in Virginia.   I bought these Tevas cause I knew Texas was hot and full of streams and creeks. I wanted something I could wear in the water and around and not mind if it got wet and torn up from the use.  They are a simple shoe—a two-piece rubber… Full review

rated 4 of 5 stars
Teva Hurricane XLT

Take a design classic...and make it a bit gnarlier. I left my first pair of Tevas on a beach, in northern Scotland. It was an unusually warm day: normally neoprene booties would be more appropriate;-)  I immediately replaced my original, smooth soled sandals, with the uprated XLTs, with a trip to hotter climes in prospect, back in 2005. Tevas are an all-day essential in Northern California in September. You'd have to work hard, to trash a pair of these XLTs. The webbing straps are tough, the d… Full review

rated 4.5 of 5 stars
Keen Solr Sandal

People who canoe, kayak, raft, stand up paddle board, boat, or hike in and out of the water will like Keen’s water-dedicated Solr. A gasket-style ankle, close fit, and smaller openings mean less sand/grit/stones get in, and a sole made of grippy rubber that is both textured and razor-siped maximizes traction. Plus, they are just plain comfortable for walking too, and the webbing is made from recycled plastic that dries quickly for a partially enclosed sandal. Photo above shows the top of the shoe,… Full review

rated 3.5 of 5 stars
Chaco Lowdown Sandal

The Lowdown Sandal is a lightweight take on the familiar Chaco design. It's very comfortable, though the strap system could be improved. The Lowdown is great for all-day wear, and a very serviceable camp shoe. I have long been a fan of Chaco sandals. I have a couple of pair of Classic Z-1 and Z-2 sandals, which have served me well for some years. However, I don’t usually take them into the backcountry, because they are so heavy and bulky. So, I have usually relied on an ancient pair of Teva sandals,… Full review

rated 4 of 5 stars
Scott Hawaii Makaha

Sturdy, good-fitting flip flop that is relatively inexpensive and comfortable for extended wear. Solid sole/midsole with a more forgiving top layer, bomb-proof nylon straps that will never pull out. These have decent traction, a looser fit, and are extremely durable. Scott has been making flip-flops for eighty years in Hawaii—they’re clearly doing something right. Scott’s website tells an interesting story about a shoemaker who relocated to Hawaii and opened a factory in 1932; World War II… Full review

rated 5 of 5 stars
OluKai Hokua

Comfortable, beefy, pricy flip-flop. They have solid arch support, a thick, grippy sole, soft footbed, and reasonably wide straps that make them comfortable to wear "around" or walking on most surfaces and trails. I found these benefit from a little break-in. Though the price is steep, they should last a long time and are a comfortable, good-looking option. I am providing my initial impressions of my new flip-flops, the OluKai Hokua, having worn them for a few weeks and walked several miles in them. Full review