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3-Season Sleeping Bags

Types of 3-Season Sleeping Bags (0° to 32°F)

photo of a 3-season down sleeping bag

3-Season Down Sleeping Bags

photo of a 3-season synthetic sleeping bag

3-Season Synthetic Sleeping Bags

photo of a 3-season hybrid sleeping bag

3-Season Hybrid Sleeping Bags

Top Picks

How we choose: The best 3-season sleeping bags highlighted here were selected based on 1530 reviews of 579 products. Our top picks are those that are readily-available in the United States and have received the highest overall ratings from reviewers.

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Top 3-Season Down Sleeping Bag

Western Mountaineering MegaLite

user rating: 5 of 5 (12 reviews)

This bag is high quality, very versatile, compresses to 6x6 inches with a compression sack. Very comfortable to sleep in, not like most other mummy bags. Can be used well below 30 degrees, or up to the 70's. Well-made and a long-term investment.

Reasons to Buy

  • Light, warm, and versatile
  • Roomy and very comfortable
  • Packs ultra-small, and retains its loft for many years
  • The Pertex fabric is somewhat water-resistant and quite durable
  • The bag has continuous baffles allowing the down to be shifted as needed
  • The hood fits well, and the draft tube works very well
  • Full-length zipper
  • Very high quality

Reasons to Avoid

  • Need to be a little careful so the zipper doesn't snag the fabric
  • Not Waterproof

I've had this bag for 17 years and have used it in a wide range of temps in tents, tarps, and shelters. I've been toasty down to 15 degrees F. and comfy up into the 70s. The bag's extra girth means you can wear fleece or whatever to extend the range for lower temps, or in the summer if it's warm you can unzip it and use it like a quilt. A really nice bag that is still like new (except for where I snagged the Pertex with the zipper and had to make a 1" field repair which has held for a few years so far).

Read more: Western Mountaineering MegaLite reviews (12)

3-Season Down Sleeping Bag

Big Agnes Torchlight UL 20

user rating: 5 of 5 (1 review)

The Torchlight UL 20 is a fantastically cozy and versatile backpacking mummy bag. Super spacious when you want, but snug when you want that, with customizable zipper options. The ultralight 850 fill power Down-Tek makes it a great choice for ounce-counting backpackers.

Reasons to Buy

  • Lofty
  • Soft and cozy
  • Warm
  • Versatile
  • Roomy generous hood
  • Easily adjustable to your size
  • Water-resistant DownTek fill
  • No down leakage through the shell
  • Lightweight
  • Quick drying shell fabric
  • Good value for the quality and features

Reasons to Avoid

  • Zippers on adjustable panels snag easily
  • Snag "resistant" zipper isn't "snag proof"
  • The internal pocket would be better on the top side of the bag than on the bottom

I have been using a Mont-Bell UL SS Down Hugger #4 sleeping bag for about ten years. It has served me well, being very lightweight (1.5 lbs), and warm enough most of the time (rated 34°). It also has stretchy elastic baffle stitching, which made it easy to fit my extra girth. It is starting to look its age though, and sometimes I push the temperature rating or get a little nervous when camping in a wet environment. I was on the lookout for something new when the opportunity to try the Big Agnes Torchlight UL 20° sleeping bag came up.

Read more: Big Agnes Torchlight UL 20 review (1)

3-Season Down Sleeping Bag

Western Mountaineering VersaLite

user rating: 5 of 5 (8 reviews)

The Western Mountaineering Versalite is just an overall great sleeping bag. While a bit on the pricey side, the Versalite is a well thought out sleeping bag design that is roomy, provides great warmth for its weight, and utilizes quality materials and construction. The Western Mountaineering Versalite is a great choice for anyone who has reached the point where they are looking to invest in a sleeping bag that will provide great performance in a very lightweight design.

Reasons to Buy

  • Lightweight
  • Quality construction
  • A truly snag free zipper
  • Outstanding draft collar and draft tube along zipper
  • Made in the USA

Reasons to Avoid

  • The price is a bit on the high side

Overview I’ve owned a number of sleeping bags over the years since I first got into backpacking back in the 1970s and really had no complaints with any of the bags I have owned. After I retired a number of years ago and started to get back into backpacking again I had picked up a Summit 20 sleeping bag made by Outdoor Vitals. The Summit 20 was a low cost and reasonable lightweight bag that I’ve used for the last five or so years and it does its job and I have no complaints. As I creep up towards my mid 60s I’ve been tweaking my gear to save weight where I can as I’ve found the lighter my pack is the more I enjoy my trips.

Read more: Western Mountaineering VersaLite reviews (8)

Top 3-Season Synthetic Sleeping Bag

Kelty Tuck 20

user rating: 5 of 5 (4 reviews)

Warm, comfortable bag that performs as rated, with convenient features usually associated with more expensive gear.

Reasons to Buy

  • Price
  • Accurate rating
  • Features

Reasons to Avoid

  • A little narrow
  • Large packed size

I paid $89 for the Kelty Tuck. At that price, I really wasn't expecting much. I do most of my camping in North Carolina, though, so even though I was spending two weeks in the Sangre de Cristo mountains of New Mexico, I really couldn't justify spending $200 for a 20-degree bag. So I bought cheap and prepared to suffer. So, first thing, the EN temperature rating is pretty accurate. On one night, the temperature was in the 30s, and it was raining so everything was damp, and I was maybe a little cool.

Read more: Kelty Tuck 20 reviews (4)

3-Season Down Sleeping Bag

Western Mountaineering Apache MF

user rating: 5 of 5 (4 reviews)

A fabulous bag for summer mountain backpacking. Great 3-season bag.

Reasons to Buy

  • Great summer mountain backpacking sleeping bag
  • Anti-snag zipper
  • Very lightweight for the warmth
  • Shoulder collar keeps warmth in

Reasons to Avoid

  • Confining mummy
  • Expensive, but worth it

Summary - You can't go wrong with this bag for summer mountain backpacking. Warm with low weight. Anti-snag feature on zipper makes that midnight bathroom run a bit easier. And the way I like to re-hydrate with lots of warm tea after dinner, I cannot say enough about the zipper design. Also the shoulder collar (see pic) which is separate from the hood, does a great job in keeping any cold draft out, and on warmer nights, it can be left open. Ventilation on feet with the 2-way zipper is great when you need it.

Read more: Western Mountaineering Apache MF reviews (4)

3-Season Down Sleeping Bag

Marmot Angel Fire

user rating: 4.5 of 5 (4 reviews)

I've owned the Marmot Angel Fire bag since 2004/5(?) and it has been my primary bag. Excellent compression, durable exterior, no defects/issues for over 12 years with an average of 8+ trips a year. Pros: lightweight, small pack size. Cons: mummy style can be difficult to sleep comfortably in as a side sleeper, but this is user preference.

Reasons to Buy

  • This bag is light!
  • Very warm bag (for almost all the years I've used it)
  • Color: light blue and black (but this should matter least of all features!)

Reasons to Avoid

  • Wish there was a pillow slot/stash near the head.
  • Mummy style can feel cramped for a sidesleeper (not a downside of the bag—just the style).
  • After about 12 years of heavy usage (8+ trips/year) this bag no longer keeps me warm without supplementation.

The only reason I didn't repurchase this bag is that my personal dimensions have changed over the last couple of years and the mummy bag style just isn't as fitting to my physique as a more generous bag. However with that being said, this is an incredible bag and under the same conditions I would buy it again. I purchased it new in 2004 or 2005. I never had trouble with the down leaking, excess moisture retention in humid conditions, or warmth. For me this bag was almost too warm at times and I would sleep with it unzipped.

Read more: Marmot Angel Fire reviews (4)

3-Season Down Sleeping Bag

Western Mountaineering AlpinLite

user rating: 4.5 of 5 (4 reviews)

Great lightweight three-season bag.

Reasons to Buy

  • High quality down
  • Lightweight
  • No-snag zipper
  • Roomy for a big guy
  • Quality construction

Reasons to Avoid

  • No pocket near head
  • Not cheap

I bought this bag after taking a nice 30-degree bag on the John Muir Trail in mid-September. We hit some cold weather with nights dipping into the teens. To stay warm, I had to put on every piece of clothing I had and wear it in the sleeping bag. For about 4 oz of additional weight, the Western Mountaineering AlpinLite solved my problem. It is light, super high quality, and fits me great. I got the long version because I am 6'2". One problem I always have with mummy bags is the width at the shoulders.

Read more: Western Mountaineering AlpinLite reviews (4)

3-Season Down Sleeping Bag

Sea to Summit Trek TK II

user rating: 5 of 5 (2 reviews)

Good blend of performance, weight, and price.

Reasons to Buy

  • Lightweight
  • Warm
  • Semi-rectangular/semi-mummy shape
  • Very good value
  • Opens up fully for use as blanket, or for airing out.

Reasons to Avoid

  • Could be lighter
  • Zipper system can be confusing
  • Hood does not have an "in-between"—Either it lies flat, or you have to cinch it up fully

Spent WAY too much time searching for a sleeping bag that hit my top three "must haves" Lightweight Warm Not constricting Tried Big Agnes, North Face, a very attractive offering from Thermolite, REI's own brand, etc...  Finally decided on the Trek TKII after a test of the TK I version at my local REI.  It met my top three musts closely enough to earn a top rating. The Good: This is a semi-rectangular bag, not a mummy bag. That means is the shape is mummy like, but the footbox is much wider than a traditional mummy bag.

Read more: Sea to Summit Trek TK II reviews (2)

3-Season Synthetic Sleeping Bag

Mountain Hardwear Lamina 0

user rating: 4.5 of 5 (9 reviews)

Great and affordable 0 degree bag. Comes with a built in hood to keep your noggin warm.

Reasons to Buy

  • Cost
  • Comfort
  • PACKABILITY
  • Weight
  • Wicks water very efficiently

Reasons to Avoid

  • Foot box feels small to me

I am a hammock camper. I use a Clark NX-250. My mindset for gear when I pack is more packability and versatility than being one of these ultra light campers. I like to camp in early spring, fall, winter. I had been researching numerous cold weather bags when I stumbled upon this bad boy. From reading the reviews most stated what I was looking for... PACKABILITY! Most cold weather bags are so big when stuff sacked that you cannot fit them into most packs. I did not want my bag being strapped to the back of my pack in wintery conditions so looked long and hard for one that might meet my criteria that was WARM , PACKABLE, and if able to be fairly light.

Read more: Mountain Hardwear Lamina 0 reviews (9)

3-Season Down Sleeping Bag

Kelty Cosmic Down 20

user rating: 4.5 of 5 (18 reviews)

Massive bang for the buck...

Reasons to Buy

  • Value!
  • Water resistant down
  • Quality construction

Reasons to Avoid

  • A little heavy by today's standards

Four and a half stars, so far. I bought this bag a short while ago before leaving for my job as a medic in a summer camp in Maine. That being said, the mercury has hit between 90 and 101 everyday for about a week, so this bag with a European temperature rating of 19 degrees has not seen much use except as a bed throw. Even during early chilly nights I mostly used it as a blanket. By today's standards, 600 fill duck down is not the greatest, but back in the day, any down rated at 600 was the bomb.

Read more: Kelty Cosmic Down 20 reviews (18)

More 3-Season Sleeping Bags

Trailspace reviewers have shared 1530 reviews of 579 different 3-season sleeping bags. Narrow your search and view more specific 3-season sleeping bag recommendations in these categories:

3-Season Down Sleeping Bags

3-Season Synthetic Sleeping Bags

3-Season Hybrid Sleeping Bags

All Sleeping Bags and Pads

Other Types of Sleeping Bags and Pads

Find more sleeping bags and pads reviewed in these related categories:

Cold Weather Sleeping Bags (below 0°F)

Warm Weather Sleeping Bags (above 35°F)

Quilts

+4 more types

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