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Trail Running Shoes

If the Shoe Fits: A Buyers' Guide to Trail Running Shoes

 

Choosing the right trail running shoes, or trail runners, is critical for a positive running experience. Trail runners are about function, not fashion. So, before you punch in your credit card number on your favorite outdoor retailer’s website, or randomly choose a shoe off the wall at your local sporting goods store, consider the features of the various trail running shoes on the market, as well as the unique nature and biomechanics of your feet.

Contents

 

Know Your Feet

Like feet, trail runners come in all shapes, sizes, and stability levels.

First, take a look at your feet. Are they wide or narrow? Are your arches high or flat? (See foot types below.) Do you run or walk on the outsides or insides of your feet? There is a continuum of running shoes, from the neutral cushioning category, to the moderate stability category, to the high stability category.


Trail runners come in a variety of shapes, sizes, and stability levels.

Stability, aka arch support, is the amount of rigidity in a shoe and is one of the most important considerations in selecting a running shoe. Knee pain, shin splints, and plantar fasciitis oftentimes signal a need for more stability. Conversely, shoes with too much stability can force a runner to the outsides of their feet, causing ankle pain.

If you have a running store nearby, a knowledgeable staff member will be able to examine your feet and watch you walk and run. By checking your gait, it becomes apparent whether you over-pronate, supinate/under-pronate, or neither, thus directing you to a shoe with the proper amount of stability.

Over-pronation means rolling your foot inward while walking or running. It occurs when the heel strikes first and then rolls overly inwards to toe-off. This can create torque on the lower leg with each foot strike. Some slight pronation is normal.

In general, the flatter the foot, the more likely a person is to over-pronate. Flat feet are more flexible, thus requiring a shoe that can control that inwards motion of the foot. Added stability in a shoe helps to support the arch and guide the foot in a straightforward motion. If the over-pronation is minimal, a “moderate stability” shoe will suffice. For more severe over-pronation, look for a “high stability” shoe.

Supination, or under-pronation, means rolling your foot and ankle outward while walking and running. It is characteristic of feet with high arches. This type of foot has a more defined structure, causing the runner to walk on the outsides of his or her feet. Since this is the most rigid part of the foot, this type of runner needs a shoe that is more flexible. These shoes are referred to as “neutral” or “cushioning” shoes. By nature, trail running shoes tend to be stiffer because they need to protect the feet on more challenging terrain. Folks that supinate simply will want to look for a more flexible trail running shoe.


Try the wet foot test to find your foot type.

If you don’t have a local expert to diagnose your gait and foot type, try the wet foot test. Get the bottoms of your feet wet and step on a piece of newspaper or paper towel. Compare your wet footprints to the foot types in the chart below. This will help you determine whether you have a high, low, or neutral arch. A flat foot will leave a complete print of the foot, while a high-arched foot will only imprint the forefoot, the heel, and perhaps a bit of the outside edge.

Also, take a look at the wear patterns on the soles of an old pair of running or walking shoes. If you tend to wear down the inner edges of the bottom of the shoe, you likely over-pronate. If you grind down the outside edges, you supinate. Wear in the middle indicates a neutral arch.

 

Know the Terrain

Next, consider the type of trails and terrain you’ll be tackling.

Kathy Hobbs, executive director of the American Trail Running Association and manager of the Teva U.S. Mountain Running Team, suggests that you “consider the terrain that you will be running and go to a specialty shoe retailer and get their advice on what shoe meets your needs.” You should also consider any injuries past or present when selecting a shoe.

While some runners may get away with using their regular jogging skins from running the roads, you are best off getting a pair of trail-running specific shoes. “Road shoes are meant for a foot strike that is relatively the same over time and distance,” says Hobbs. “Trail shoes are for the uneven, unpredictable, changeable nature of the terrain.”

The various types and models of trail running shoes can seem daunting. Hobbs lists the following shoe features as the most important when considering your needs:

Keep an eye out for shoes with a gusseted tongue and wrap-around lacing, both make for a snugger fit, keeping out trail debris. Match your shoe’s features to the terrain you expect to encounter regularly and your needs.

 

Know if the Shoe Fits

Now you’ll need to try shoes on. If you are new to trail running, be prepared for trail runners to feel a bit foreign, even if you are accustomed to road running shoes. Trail runners have a lower profile, giving you the sense that you are closer to the ground and better able to feel the earth beneath your feet. Being aware of the ruts and roots on the trail will help you respond appropriately. Trail runners also have wider bases and more aggressive treads.

Hobbs says “consider fit and feel when testing a shoe and if it feels good, provides appropriate support, and good grip.” If the shoe fits, it will feel snug and boot-like in the back, anchoring your heel in, and more like a sandal up front, allowing your toes to wiggle around.

Be sure you have 1/4 to 1/2 inch at the toe end of the shoe to allow for some swelling room. The longer the run, the more your feet will swell. Hobbs emphasizes the importance of sizing, saying that you will “typically need a half size bigger than your street shoes to make sure your toes don’t smash up to the toe box.” It’s the best way to avoid those nasty black and blue toenails.

In the end, you want to pick a trail runner that feels natural on your feet. You shouldn’t be excessively aware of the shoe. If you are, it may not be right for you.

Once you hit the trails you’ll be glad you chose a shoe that fits properly and has all the features necessary for your trail running adventures. A new pair of kicks can make all the difference in creating a successful and fun trail running experience.

The Best Trail Running Shoes

The best trail running shoes, reviewed and curated by the Trailspace community. The latest review was added on May 15, 2021. Stores' prices and availability are updated daily.

user rating: 5 of 5 (5)
Vasque Blur
$60
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Vasque Amp
$65
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (18)
Vibram FiveFingers KSO Barefoot / Minimal Shoe / Trail Shoe / Trail Running Shoe / Water Shoe
$85
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
The North Face Ultra 109 GTX
$100 - $120
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Altra Superior 4.0
$88 - $110
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (6)
Salomon XA Pro 3D Ultra
$599
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (2)
Salomon XT Wings 3
$60
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Hoka Challenger ATR 2
$179
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Topo Athletic Hydroventure 2
$105 - $140
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Merrell Mix Master Move
$55
user rating: 5 of 5 (1)
Inov-8 Roclite 315
$50 - $83
user rating: 4 of 5 (10)
Salomon XA Pro 3D
$32 - $129
user rating: 4 of 5 (8)
La Sportiva Wildcat
$110
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
La Sportiva Bushido II
$90 - $130
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (1)
Hoka Challenger ATR 5
$104 - $130
user rating: 4 of 5 (2)
Salomon X-Scream
$79 - $99
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Inov-8 Roclite G 345 GTX Hiking Boot / Trail Running Shoe
$116 - $190
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Hoka Challenger ATR 3
$50 - $79
user rating: 4 of 5 (1)
Hoka Bondi 4
$109
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (5)
Salomon SpeedCross 3
$40
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (1)
Pearl Izumi EM Trail M2
$55 - $119
user rating: 3.5 of 5 (1)
New Balance Leadville v3
$70
user rating: 3 of 5 (3)
La Sportiva Mutant
$87 - $135
user rating: 3 of 5 (2)
Salomon XA Pro 3D Ultra 2
$40
Merrell All Out Crush
$149 - $179
user rating: 2 of 5 (1)
Altra King MT 1.5
$84
La Sportiva Lycan II
$90 - $120
La Sportiva Kaptiva GTX
$120 - $159
user rating: 5 of 5 (7)
Vibram FiveFingers KSO Trek Barefoot / Minimal Shoe / Trail Shoe / Trail Running Shoe
$125 MSRP
user rating: 5 of 5 (6)
Inov-8 X-Talon 212
user rating: 5 of 5 (4)
Inov-8 Flyroc 310
user rating: 5 of 5 (4)
Salomon XR Mission
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Salomon Sense Mantra
user rating: 5 of 5 (3)
Adidas Tangent ATS
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Brooks Cascadia 8
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Salomon XT Wings 2
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Inov-8 Roclite 295
user rating: 5 of 5 (2)
Inov-8 Trailroc 245
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (5)
Vibram FiveFingers TrekSport Barefoot / Minimal Shoe / Trail Shoe / Trail Running Shoe
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (4)
The North Face Ultra 105 GTX XCR
$110 MSRP
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (4)
Vibram FiveFingers Sprint Barefoot / Minimal Shoe / Trail Running Shoe / Water Shoe
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (3)
New Balance MT10 Minimus
$100 MSRP
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (3)
Saucony ProGrid Outlaw
$110 MSRP
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (3)
Vasque Velocity GTX
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (3)
Hoka Mafate Speed
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (3)
Adidas Wanaka Trail GTX
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (2)
Brooks Cascadia 9
user rating: 4.5 of 5 (2)
Topo Athletic MT
$100 MSRP
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Foot types

Determine your foot type with the wet foot test.

Foot Type  Wear Patterns  The Issue  The Shoe Type

Flat

Your treads show signs of wear on the inside and by the big toe.

Your foot is very flexible and you strike the ground on the outside of your heel and roll inwards, meaning over-pronation. You need some motion control to prevent that inward roll.

High Stability
or 
Motion Control

Neutral

Your treads show signs of wear down the middle.

Your foot is neutral, meaning you don’t over-pronate, or you only do so slightly, which is normal. No major correction is needed.

Moderate Stability or
Neutral/Cushioning

High Arch

Your treads show signs of wear on the outside and by the little toe.

Your foot is very rigid and you tend to run on the outsides of your feet, called supination or under-pronation. Your shoes should be well cushioned and flexible to counteract the rigidity of your feet.

Neutral/Cushioning

 

Need more help getting started running trails? Read our Trail Running 101.

Recent Trail Running Shoe Reviews

rated 1 of 5 stars
Salomon SpeedCross 3

These shoes are just above crap. Cheaply made. Sole wears out fast. Customer service bad. US sizing is not correct, sized .5 too small actual. Buy at your own peril.  Full review

rated 4.5 of 5 stars
La Sportiva Bushido II

The La Sportiva Bushido II is a solid, comfortable trail running shoe for all-around, year-round use on trails and mountains. With excellent traction and fit, it retains everything I loved about the original Bushido trail runner with some minor refinements. When I heard that La Sportiva was introducing an updated Bushido II trail runner my first response was "No!" What if they screwed something up? I've worn at least six pairs, possibly more, of the original La Sportiva Bushidos over the five years… Full review

rated 4 of 5 stars
Saucony Koa ST

Pretty great trail shoes for hiking and running in loose conditions. Very comfortable, nice fit, looks great, but not without some drawbacks. Having been transitioning my gear from a more traditional kit to a more lightweight/UL backpacking kit, one of the first things I considered was moving from a traditional light hiking boot to a lighter trail shoe for hiking and backpacking. Luckily I found these on a closeout sale, and was immediately drawn to their sharp good looks (the brilliant colors of… Full review

rated 4.5 of 5 stars
Altra Superior 4.0

The Superior 4.0 is a supremely comfortable shoe, with many improvements over its predecessors (better fit, materials, flexibility). Yet the 4.0 maintains most of the best characteristics that make this model my favorite hiking shoe. They are responsive to the trail, fit my narrow feet perfectly, and the tread is excellent for gripping loose gravel and even snowy patches. They are lightweight and dry fast. My only disappointment is that they did not last quite as long as my Superior 3.0/3.5s. Description… Full review

rated 5 of 5 stars
Altra Superior 4.0

Every day and twice on Sunday. Hands down the most comfortable running shoe I've ever worn. You won't be disappointed. The large toe box is different from most brands, but I'm sold. Full review

rated 4.5 of 5 stars
Adidas Response Trail 9

The traction is fantastic and stability (particularly on technical descents) is superb. They're a heavy shoe, but don't feel overly heavy on the trail. They size small, I've gone up a full size and they still feel snug. The lacing system and build are excellent. Had these for three months and used them a fair bit trail running on steep muddy trails over winter in Wellington, New Zealand. The traction is fantastic and stability (particularly on technical descents) is superb. In mud and on wet rock… Full review

rated 4.5 of 5 stars
Hoka Challenger ATR 5

The Hoka Challenger ATR 5 is a great trail running shoe that can double as a nice backpacking shoe for people looking for a nice comfortable shoe with plenty of room in the toe box and that's also available in wide sizes. I am home based in Washington state but make regular trips to California to visit family and when I do I always try to squeeze in a backpacking or fishing trip to the east side of the Sierras. In Washington I generally wear a lightweight hiking or mountaineering boot for most of… Full review

rated 4 of 5 stars
Inov-8 Mudclaw G 260

An aggressive, deep-lugged tread and snug fit make the Mudclaw G-260 a prime choice for muddy trails and other soft surfaces. Comfortable enough for all-day runs. The graphene-enhanced soles also grip well on wet and dry rock and hard-packed dirt, but the lugs can chip. Best held in reserve for running over mud, bogs, sand, and other soft surfaces. “Mud, mud, glorious mud Nothing quite like it for soothing the blood…” The Mudclaw G 260 is Inov-8’s top shoe for running on muddy trails or… Full review

rated 5 of 5 stars
Topo Athletic Hydroventure 2

A nice breathable waterproof trail running shoe. I have wide feet. Even shoes that are supposed to have a large toe box result in stubbed toes and blisters between toes. I decided to try Topo Athletic shoes and they do not disappoint. My toes can spread out easily. I got the Hydroventure model as I wanted something waterproof. I couldn't find them in a store anywhere and had to order them online but tried a different pair of Topo Athletic shoes at REI before ordering them. I was glad I did as the… Full review