Open main menu


Keen Zerraport II

photo: Keen Zerraport II sport sandal

The Zerraport II replaced the Keen Zerraport.

Specs

Men's
Price MSRP: $110.00
Current Retail: $109.95-$115.00
Historic Range: $69.99-$115.00
Reviewers Paid: $42.50
Women's
Price MSRP: $110.00
Current Retail: $115.00
Historic Range: $79.99-$115.00

Reviews

1 review
5-star:   0
4-star:   1
3-star:   0
2-star:   0
1-star:   0

Water shoe with great drainage and Keen’s well-known toe protection. I like Keens around boats and rocks because they keep my toes from getting mashed. This one has the added benefit of siped soles, good traction, and an open design that dries quickly. The midsole/sole is also thick enough for moderate hiking. Adjustability of straps is kind of limited.

Pros

  • Toe protection
  • Comfortable footbed
  • Thick sole/midsole protects feet
  • Traction
  • Open design, dries quickly

Cons

  • Weight compared to some water sandals
  • Lateral support
  • Limited adjustment potential

Keen‘s Zerraport II is a successor to their Zerraport, which in turn is a successor to the long-discontinued hydro guide. https://www.trailspace.com/gear/keen/hydro-guide/

It combines great toe protection, a comfortable fit under your feet, good traction, and an open design that drains water very quickly. 

ABDF064F-64E7-41F0-ADDB-387EAF8F0D3D.jpg
Basic design: one long strap for the front of your feet that pulls tight, heel strap with hook/loop adjustment

FIT: The Zerraport II has a reasonably forgiving fit—my feet are E width in front, no problems with these sandals. They run true to size; I wear a men’s 11 1/2 or 12 in street shoes; the size 12 is a good fit for me. 

There are two ways to adjust the straps. The heel can be opened up and re-fastened (Velcro aka hook/loop design), and the front strap pulls through the single friction buckle pictured above. My feet are fairly wide; there is maybe one inch of strap when I pull them tight, so a really large foot might not work with these.  

2D2FFA3B-E9FA-45DE-8F87-AE4A88CE33F9.jpg
Top view shows the "open" strap design. Water escapes easily.

COMFORT: Like virtually every Keen sandal I have ever worn, there is a moderately firm but forgiving contoured footbed. It’s a strength of this brand.  The strap material is fairly soft polyester; they’re not rough or abrasive. A significant improvement is the size and shape of the toe bumper and the way the strap runs through it; it used to be a source of friction, but Keen reduced the size of the toe bumper. 

3CD3C3D6-863F-4943-9ACB-980DA5547002.jpg
Instep view

The pieces where the straps run through gave me concerns about friction points, but that has not proved to be an issue. Note how thick the sole/midsole is; they provide pretty good protection from pointy rocks.   

1C4AEA7F-8322-48B1-93A1-24FEB9AAA9C3.jpg
Outside edge of foot

TRACTION: As a water shoe, traction is a pretty important quality. I have been reasonably happy with these. The rubber compound seems fine, perhaps not as sticky as some other options like the Bedrock Cairn Pro’s "megagrip" sticky rubber. The soles have good tread for walking on dry land, though, and the soles are razor cut/siped like a pair of boat shoes. Consequently, I have felt pretty stable on wet rocks by the Atlantic this week while we’re in Maine and on slick river rocks close by our home near the Potomac River.  

EB57D4F2-3685-4E3B-BB2B-6BF72583DA96.jpg
Want to know how good the traction is? Walk on slimy river rocks.
This shows the tread pattern.  

One note—as a shoe that has a little bit of extra room, probably for a thin pair of neoprene socks if you’re rafting or canoeing in really cold water, lateral stability is just OK; might improve somewhat with a water/river sock. 

ED4D72CE-C487-4E48-861D-B9C1F7209B62.jpg
Detail that shows the razor cut soles—this usually helps with traction on smooth surfaces. Nice attention to detail.

HOW FAST DO THEY DRY OUT/DRAIN WATER: Very good to excellent, comparable to other open shoes like Teva and Chaco. Because they’re open, they dry fairly quickly too. The tradeoff with any open design is that little stones and grit can more easily work their way under your feet, whereas closed shoes made of mesh tend to limit that.

A few more photos:

D4494085-A5FA-4FC4-8D1D-B89EF939FC86.jpg
Good for walking on dry land too.
DFAB5B59-770D-46E0-BBBE-3AFBC0BA825F.jpg
 
493DC137-5A32-4D44-9FA5-8961EA554AC9.jpg
 

TAKEAWAYS: A good option from Keen if you prefer a more open-air design and/or want a little extra room for a neoprene sock for cold weather water sports, and a solid option for walking on trails that aren’t too angled/challenging (lateral stability isn’t ideal for rougher trails).

Experience

3-4 months of use on trails, rainy days, beach, riverside, and walking around.

Source: bought it used
Price Paid: $42.50

About the Author

Andrew Friedman is a New Hampshire native who loves the Presidentials and spent his college summers guiding trips in the Adirondack High Peaks. He loved introducing his children to hiking and the outdoors. In addition to New England and the Adirondacks, he has hiked the shores of the Great Lakes, the Tetons, a number of California's state and national parks, the Albanian Alps, and trails in India, Asia, and the Middle East. Andrew logged his first review on Trailspace in 2007 and joined the Trailspace Review Corps in 2011. Andrew lives and works in the DC metro area.

Alicia MacLeay TRAILSPACE STAFF

Great review, Andrew! And I'm glad you got to venture up to Maine to use them too.


4 months ago

You May Like

Recently on Trailspace

Win Kora Wool Activewear for Year-Round Adventuring

Klean Kanteen 27oz Classic Review

GSI Outdoors Pinnacle Dualist HS Review

NiteCore NU25 Review

Which Leather Waterproofing/Conditioner Do You Use and Why?

Zamberlan Baffin GT Review