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Brass, telescoping, candle lanterns

Hi, I have two very old brass candle lanterns...on one is a metal emblem reading EARLY WINTERS and the other has a metal emblem reading LL BEAN

I am missing the top part on the Bean unit and cannot for the life of me find any of these items for sale full or parts!  All I see is UCO units which look pretty much the same but have no brass ones...do you folks think mine were made in the early eighties by UCO and sold by Beans and Early Winters???

Plus, to those who write it is taboo to use in a tent...well, that is subjective...I am seventy-one and have hunted from Alaska to Maine...in AK I took these units on many hunts in the mountains and woods of the state...and when the temp is twenty degrees at nite, or the day has been cold and very wet, those candles add a lot of comfort...although they don't throw much heat, you FEEL warmer when they are on...and they throw just enough light to show that thing that bumped your elbow was your hunting pal and not a BEAR!

If you don't have much common sense, then don't use one at all...I used to hang mine from the very top of the tent and down far enough to not be in the way and not to throw one bit of heat on the tent...we used it mostly for comfort and used battery ones later in life when small ones came out...I know of guys who used candles and put them on the floor of the tent...two pals who I thought were the best outdoorsmen I ever knew, were caribou hunting on the peninsula and it was cold and rainy...they put a candle on the top of a can of Sterno heat...the candle burnt down to the can and they did not notice until it exploded...the tent burnt down and the two shivered and huddled in the dark until they could signal a low flying plane the next day...I could not believe how stupid they had been...so, think about everything you do since the tiniest mistake can kill you in places like Alaska...

Are we allowed to sell hunting and camping gear on this site??? I am a newbie and have not read the rules yet...lol

Probably the units were made abroad and sold under various brand names....

Twenty degrees is cold??

Found this link for you!

I have no issue with candles in a tent, as long as the lantern design precludes any possible casual contact between the flame and items in its midst.  The designs you refer to fulfill this criterion, so you good as far as I am concerned. 

My issue with candles is they can be messy.  My primary camping partner is very clumsy, and has gotten wax on my kit several times.  I no longer use a candle when he is tenting with me.  But I use them when solo in my tent, to reduce condensation on tent walls, mounting it below the vent on top of my tent to fortify the draft, in the same position you describe.

Ed

Twenty degrees in the middle of the Alaska range in early September is cold....can it get colder...yes...my point was that I only used them for those hunts and not for much colder ones or much warmer trips...they did just enough at that stage to make the tent seem a bit warmer and pleasant...much of it was a placebo type effect since we know they don't throw much heat...I've been on the north slope when the ambient was below minus seventy and the wind chill, I was told, was -105...is that cold enough for ya?  

I used candle lanterns for years.  Now I like battery operated headlamps. 

Both have their pros and cons and can serve well in many cases...

A UCO candle lantern produces about 1,900 btu per hour, a human at rest puts out around 300 btu.

Curtis Evans said:

A UCO candle lantern produces about 1,900 btu per hour, a human at rest puts out around 300 btu.

Correction:  A candle also generates ~ 300 BTUs/hours, approximately what a human generates.  1,900 BTUs approaches the output of a medium size window mounted air conditioner.

Ed

That’s the numbers I got from UCO a bit ago.

Curtis Evans said:

That’s the numbers I got from UCO a bit ago.

 I cannot explain the figure you obtained from UCO.  But it is way off.  This link will provide access to a calculator that can be used to convert BTU/hr to Watt/hr and vice versa.  If we converted 1900 BTUs into watts the conversion equates to over 550 watts, roughly twice the out put of a heat lamp commonly used in grocery store RTE food displays and  residential bathrooms.  You can feel the heat from such a lamp at some distance, but the heat from a candle can only be noticed close up.

Ed    

August 8, 2020
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