35 mm Camera for backpacking

8:58 a.m. on March 31, 2002 (EST)

I am spending two weeks this summer backpacking in the west. Please suggest a good 35 mm point and shoot camera that has above average optics and will withstand the rigors of such a trip. I have seen a lot of plastic junk out there.

9:52 a.m. on March 31, 2002 (EST)


I really like my Pentax IQZoom. Best price I found was on Amazon.

5:14 p.m. on March 31, 2002 (EST)
4 reviewer rep
8 forum posts

Nikon is one of, if not the best camera company in the world. You might want to check out there Lite Touch Zoom 130 ED/QD. It weighs only 6.4 ounces w/ batteries. 3.4x (38mm-130mm) zoom. It has a remote control so you can take self portraits of yourself. It is porbably the best compact 35mm camera on the market.

Quote:

I am spending two weeks this summer backpacking in the west. Please suggest a good 35 mm point and shoot camera that has above average optics and will withstand the rigors of such a trip. I have seen a lot of plastic junk out there.

8:53 p.m. on March 31, 2002 (EST)


a.k.a. B Taylor

Although its not the most well known brand, I've been using my Yashica T4 Super for all my climbing and backpacking trips for the past 2 years and its worked beautifully. Just finished shooting 2 rolls of slide flim from a recent trip to CO and they turned out great. Its weather resistant thanks to o-rings at all the opening points and its got a Zeiss glass lens (almost all are plastic) so the picture quality is top notch. Is a great deal for around $150 (last time I checked) at B & H Photo on the web. Anyways, that's my $0.02.

Quote:

I am spending two weeks this summer backpacking in the west. Please suggest a good 35 mm point and shoot camera that has above average optics and will withstand the rigors of such a trip. I have seen a lot of plastic junk out there.

5:21 a.m. on April 1, 2002 (EST)


a.k.a. Kevin Rooney

This is a frequent question asked of "The Gear Guy" (http://www.outsidemag.com/outsidestore/gearguy/todaysquestion.html) and he recommends a Yashica T4.

I second Brandon and suggest a T4.

 

Quote:

I am spending two weeks this summer backpacking in the west. Please suggest a good 35 mm point and shoot camera that has above average optics and will withstand the rigors of such a trip. I have seen a lot of plastic junk out there.

7:05 a.m. on April 1, 2002 (EST)
28 reviewer rep
1,261 forum posts
Forget the point and shoot........

Get on the net and locate a Rollie 35S. A metal rangefinder with a retractable Glass Schneider lens and built in exposure meter. Focal length is 35mm with a F: 3.5. The camera is the size of a pack of cigarettes. Camera is completely manual.

7:31 a.m. on April 1, 2002 (EST)

Yashica T4 is definately the way to go, excellent optics, very small, has "weatherproof" gasket, fixed 28mm lens

3:31 p.m. on April 1, 2002 (EST)
19 reviewer rep
6 forum posts

When it comes to a point & shoot, the T4 is probably your best choice. For the record though, it comes with a 35mm, 3.5 fixed lens, not a 28mm lens. That might sound like a small thing, but when it comes to shooting outdoor scenics, the difference between a 35mm lens and a 28mm lens can be pretty significant. In fact, one of the main reasons I still carry a small SLR is because I can't find a point and shoot with a high quality 28mm (or wider)lens.

12:51 p.m. on April 17, 2002 (EDT)
Olympus XA

The Olympus XA may be the most clean, elegant, functional camera ever made. That I've ever seen, at any rate. It is very, very compact and lightweight, has automatic exposure, with exposure compensation, tied to a manual f-stop, and it is manual focus. Good general purpose, high quality 35mm lens, fixed focal length. It has excellent image quality, is completely reliable, and is nuke-proof, I've come to believe. The one I have has been skied with for years, and and it even has a big dent on the back where my dad fell on it when it was in his pocket. This has not affected the images at all. With the auto exposure, it is simple to use, and as for the focus, I usually just leave it close to infinity, anyway, when taking landscapes, scenics, etc. I have used it while wearing gloves in winds gusting to 65 mph with 15 degree (F) temperatures. They came out great.

They don't make 'em like that anymore, so it might be hard to find, but if you can get one, it will be quite worth it.

PamolaPat

3:22 a.m. on June 9, 2002 (EDT)

I've read very good reviews of the t4 too. Very sharp lens and a quirky waist-level viewfinder. But it's been discontinued. Does anyone know for sure where to get it? Thanks.

2:33 p.m. on March 28, 2003 (EST)


Re: Forget the point and shoot........

Quote:


Oldie but goodie. All manual,all metal, great lens but note the 35T has the 3.5 Tessar (4 elements) while the more expensive has the 2.8 Sonnar (5 elements), a slightly better lens. Both multicoated, both can deliver amazingly sharp, beautiful results. Only the Contax or Yashica wiht the Zeiss lenses can compare

BUT you must be patient and know somethong about photograpy to use the Rollie properly.

April 7, 2020
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