Headlamps

11:31 a.m. on August 8, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

This is probably a stupid question but I see the strap-on headlamps advertised and in the stores. How are they used? Are they used on normal backpack trips instead of hand-held flashlights? I don't plan on hiking in the dark or in caves. Why would I need this product, if at all? Thanks.

2:40 p.m. on August 8, 2002 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
409 forum posts
Uhhh...

Quote:

This is probably a stupid question but I see the strap-on headlamps advertised and in the stores. How are they used? Are they used on normal backpack trips instead of hand-held flashlights? I don't plan on hiking in the dark or in caves. Why would I need this product, if at all? Thanks.

Because you want a hand's free light?

Beats climbing with a penlight in your mouth...

You obviously don't need a headlamp if you never desire to use both your hands and a light independently.

For backpacking, I haven't used a flashlight in 30 years. Headlamps are just way too functional.

Brian in SLC

10:10 p.m. on August 8, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

a.k.a. Don M, Don Morris, Don P. Morris

Quote:

This is probably a stupid question but I see the strap-on headlamps advertised and in the stores. How are they used? Are they used on normal backpack trips instead of hand-held flashlights? I don't plan on hiking in the dark or in caves. Why would I need this product, if at all? Thanks.

Headlamps are much more versatile than hand held lights. I have probably used mine most for cooking in the dark, rather than planned evening hiking.

Very few of us plan on hiking in the dark, but circumstances will sooner or later require you to walk after sunset, if you keep up the game long enough. When hiking on a trail after dark, I often carry the headlamp in my hand, because the lower angle of the light beam shows up depressions and obstacles better. But there are many situations where I place it on my head - any thing that requires me to use my hands like scrambling or pushing through brush.

I would recommend a small LED headlamp, backed up with a very small LED hand held light - total weight about 4 oz for both - for normal backpacking. If you plan on caving, you will want additional, and different, lights.

4:00 p.m. on August 9, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

Quote:

This is probably a stupid question but I see the strap-on headlamps advertised and in the stores. How are they used? Are they used on normal backpack trips instead of hand-held flashlights? I don't plan on hiking in the dark or in caves. Why would I need this product, if at all? Thanks.

Thanks one and all. Maybe I'll try one. (Sometimes old scouts are hard to retrain!!!)

9:32 p.m. on August 9, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

In the woods, it gets dark a lot sooner than you expect and many times, especially in the fall months, I get caught in the middle of dinner when the sun is almost out of the sky. Cooking with a hand held light is like being in a tent with 50 mosquitos buzzing in your ears; it sucks.

Headlamps just make life easier and more efficient when the odds are against you. Headlamps are also great for around the house jobs, like fixing the drain under the sink or working under your car (its still dark under there even on a sunny day, not to mention a cloudy day).

Cheers.

2:13 p.m. on August 10, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

Re: Uhhh...

If you get one and you plan to use it use it while wearing a helmet, make sure it will fit that helmet. I've seen some models with the batteries mounted on the rear that have a wire that is too short to run arround a helmet.

11:28 a.m. on August 13, 2002 (EDT)
28 reviewer rep
1,261 forum posts
there are alternatives to Headlamps.....

I purposely do 90% of my hiking at night. I use a lightstick attached to the my hat with velcro. The lightstick isn't blinding, won't attract bugs and doesn't scare wildlife away and bright enough to light up the ground where you are walking. In camp at night (I always have a hammock set up), I put up a string above me and hang the lightstick on it. It gives off enough light for anything.

I also carry a light, one AA battery flashlight and If I do need extra light (checking to see if the water boiled yet), I will stick that to the velcro on my hat.

6:32 a.m. on August 21, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

Re: Lightsticks

Ed, I was wondering how long the lightsticks last. I also have a lightweight one AA battery flashlight (made by Garrity) that clips onto anything, but have considered purchasing some of the lightsticks to use too.

Thanks in advance,

Hikergirl

12:27 p.m. on August 21, 2002 (EDT)
28 reviewer rep
1,261 forum posts
warning: you may really like light sticks and throw all your flashlights away!

To answer your question on how long they last - it depends.

It depends on the weather (the warmer it is the less time you get), how they were stored and how old they are. I would venture to say based on my experience - that the average is 4 hours of usable light from a lightstick (even though they claim it will last 6 to 8 hours).

After years of using lightsticks I came across a product called a Krill Lamp. This is actually a battery operated light stick. The light output is constant for the life of the batteries (about 50 hours). Cost of the Krill lamp was ~$20.00 compared to an average of $2.00 for each light stick.

I prefer to do 90% of my hiking at night. I turn my ballcap backwards (bill of cap , back of my head) and have the Krill lamp velcroed to the rear of the hat (which is now the front) water proof adhesive velcro comes with the Krill. With the hat turned backwards there is no hat bill to block the light from reaching my feet. With the krill or even with lightsticks, there is just enough illumination to see the ground in front of your feet.

It's kind of like walking in a colored bubble! The lightsticks will not freighten wild life away and they DO NOT attract insects! You can go into your tent at night with the lightstick and don't have to worry about the light bringing mosquito's in the tent with you.

They make your camp atmosphere at night pretty cool too. Hang one up on a string above you while you are in your smuggled canadian mini hammock.

I do recommend that you still use your little flashlight when handling boiling water!

Sorry this is so long. I love lightsticks in the woods and I could just go on and on and on.

Try 'em, you will like 'em!!

5:45 a.m. on August 22, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

Re: Ed, Where Did You Get Your Krill Lamp?n/m

 

10:25 a.m. on August 22, 2002 (EDT)
28 reviewer rep
1,261 forum posts
got mine thru........

http://www.backcountry-equipment.com. I recommend getting the Extreme 180 in Blue. Green is brighter, but the blue works best when using it to locate reflective tacks in trees at night. It also is not as blinding to others around you. If you do a search on "Krill Lamp" it will take you to the site of the manufacturer and you can read all about the lamps. They were originally designed for the military.

4:25 p.m. on August 22, 2002 (EDT)
(Guest)

Re: Many thanks, I'll Check It Out!n/m

 

4:23 a.m. on July 16, 2003 (EDT)
(Guest)

Re: warning: you may really like light sticks and throw all your flashlights away!

Never mind Krill's or Cyalumes... checkout www.glo-toob.com

The GLO-TOOB and GLO-TOOB FX are far better than anything out there on the market - I have a green one and couldn't be happier. Had a Krill - it pales in comparison.

November 12, 2019
Quick Reply

Please sign in to reply

 
More Topics
This forum: Older: Ultralite functionality Newer: HOW TO REMOVE SEAM-GRIP FROM THE MESH DOOR?
All forums: Older: Patagonia Ice Nine 1-pce Suit Newer: Tent Hole