Lighting the stove

8:51 p.m. on March 10, 2004 (EST)
(Guest)

What do you carry to light the stove? Lighter, water proof matches, something else?

Thanks!

Paul

5:58 a.m. on March 11, 2004 (EST)
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1,261 forum posts
Yes.............

I carry a butane lighter (for stove, mosquito coils and an occasional rope) and keep a box of water proof matches in a first aid kit.

I have also carried a mechanical spark stricker.

9:57 a.m. on March 11, 2004 (EST)
REVIEW CORPS
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flint and steel

Well, ok, the modern equivalent (how did you think Bic lighters work, anyway? That's what the "sparker wheel" is for practical purposes).

One thing about being a woodsy guy for many decades, like Ed, I believe in the "belt and suspenders" approach - lighter (the cheap Bics work well up to 17,000 ft if you keep them in a pocket so the butane stays warm enough and you shield them from the wind), waterproof/windproof matches (including the "hurricane" type) kept in one of the plastic match cases and some in a ziplock bag), book matches (the paper ones collected for free from many places, kept in a ziplock bag, or rather several scattered through my pack, the stove bag, the cook kit), strike-anywhere wood matches (kept in the plastic match case, ziplocks, etc - unfortunately the waterproof/windproofs are not "strike anywhere" so you have to have the striker surface handy), anything else that makes fire. By the way, as someone pointed out here recently, the little black rod on the bottom of plastic match cases is *not* a striking surface, but is the "flint" part of a flint and steel set (your pocket knife is the steel part). It isn't really flint, but it works.

Another handy hint for starting the stove is Fire Ribbon, Fire Paste (goes by several other names). Put a small amount of this on the generator tube of your liquid fuel stove, light it, and you get the priming without having to use your liquid fuel (white gas, kerosene, or whatever). Much less messy, and much less spectacular (than most people, but most people way overprime anyway).

8:49 p.m. on March 11, 2004 (EST)
(Guest)

Re: flint and steel

I have one of those plastic cases. Any suggestions for something that can be rolled up or placed in the case what will provide an adequate striking surface?

I think a Bic will be my primary flame...and use the matches as backup.

Thanks!!

 

By the way, as someone pointed out here recently, the little black rod on the bottom of plastic match cases is *not* a striking surface, but is the "flint" part of a flint and steel set (your pocket knife is the steel part). It isn't really flint, but it works.

8:35 p.m. on March 14, 2004 (EST)
67 reviewer rep
757 forum posts
Re: flint and steel

On lots of trips I just carry the magnesium bar/striker rod device. You can light a compressed gas stove easily with it.

To light other fires this way - scrape some magnesium onto a large dry leaf and put it in a little pile. Then set the magnesium rod down on the ground and aim the sparks at the shavings. Be ready to put the next layer of tinder on immediately.
Jim S

7:47 p.m. on May 1, 2004 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
13 forum posts
Re: Lighting the stove when it is windy

Quote:

What do you carry to light the stove? Lighter, water proof matches, something else?

Thanks!

Paul

I pack a cheapy Bic lighter (smallest size I could find), a few water pruf matches AND a short hunk of candle. When the wind kicks up, keeping a flame burning long enough can be a problem. I have heard recommendations (but not yet tried) to use the self-RE-lighting type of candles used for birthday cake pranks. If they blow out, they fire back up on their own. If you don't mind the extra ounces and want to keep your fingers further away from the stove as you light it, consider one of those BBQ lighters with the plastic trigger in the handle. You might want to investigate backpacking stoves that contain their own lighter. A push of a button generates just enough tiny spark to ignite the fuel. My Markill stove has one, but I still carry my backups since these electronic starters can and do fail (and at the worst possible time, ML). I don't mess around when it comes to my "heat".

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