Tomahawks: Pros and Cons

8:56 a.m. on December 21, 2015 (EST)
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This post will be on the pros and cons of the Tomahawk and if it's right for you or not.

The Tomahawk has been around a very long time, from when the heads were made of bone or rock to the modern super steels. So this is a proven tool and weapon and won't be going anywhere soon.

Now hawks can chop, but are not good splitters. Their light weight makes them easy to carry, and you can dress game with them, but there are easier safer ways.

The whole tactical tomahawk thing put them in the wannabe ninjas' hands because specops uses them etc. If you do that kinda work it's worth spending the money, but if you don't it's a waste of money! A cold steel hawk would serve you better. They are cheap, throw well. I carried mine when I worked.

The guys made fun of me cuz of the wooden handle and after showing them some advantages it got them thinking. Hawks can be dangerous to the user. They like to twist and turn and if you miss on a swing it's gonna be nasty. Now you can mod these hawks to the point bladeforums has a whole section on moding this hawk!

You don't got to spend a lot to get a lot in the throwing and entry level hawk. When throwers hit the $50-$100+ range you're into hand-forged heads or a 2hawks, which are not forged, but very nice hawks. Then you have hawks like the Winkler Sayoc, and it's a $815 hawk. Can you justify that buy? Do you even know how to use a hawk that good? it's also just an anti-personal hawk.

A good hawk can do more than most think or will admit too. The right hawk with the right knowledge this becomes a great and indispensable piece of gear. Oh and break a handle—just make a new one.

12:18 p.m. on December 21, 2015 (EST)
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A nice toy, I suppose...I have carried a hatchet, useful for clearing out a helispot on SAR operations. My favorite tool on a fire line was a Pulaski - it chops and grubs better than anything else in my experience.

But for normal recreational pursuits outdoors, one can go decades without toting edged weapons/tools, saving weight into the bargain.

12:47 p.m. on December 21, 2015 (EST)
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I like hikemor's post.   +1 for the Pulaski

1:43 p.m. on December 21, 2015 (EST)
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I wouldn't call them toys, but those who haven't or can't use them correctly usually have something negative to say. They  are not for everyone which is true about alot of items. The hawk has been around longer than any of us and will probably still be around long after I'm gone so that does say something  

10:14 p.m. on December 21, 2015 (EST)
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+2 for the Pulaski

I agree with hikermor and ppine - except for trail building and maintenance and SAR, in my decades in the woods and hills, I have found virtually no use for such gear. In my teens, we were required by the USFS rules (and similar state rules) to carry an axe and shovel of designated size and weight whenever going into the backcountry. Never used them on regular backpacking trips or day hikes, only when a member of a crew doing trail building and maintenance. By my 20s, the rangers and land management people realized that inexperienced and untrained folks wandering the hills were doing more damage to the forests, chopping down live, healthy trees for their huge bonfires (you don't need a bonfire to keep warm or cook).

As I have noted before, in my 7+ decades in the woods and hills (now on 7 continents), I have never had any need for weaponry for wild animals, despite being up close and personal to a wide variety of them on several of the continents I have visited.


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Met this guy in Alaska.


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Met this handsome fellow in Ngorongoro Crater in Tanzania

Only serious injury in my 75 years was a snowboarder knocking me down in the lift line and dislocating my elbow - it has long since healed and I still regularly do 3 or 4 sets of 10 pullups and 40-50 pushups every morning, as well as still benchpressing my body weight.

Live right, eat right, get out into the hills is all it takes. No need to carry all that extra heavy gear. But gotta admit, Gary P still beats me for bicycle mileage - I only get a couple thousand miles a year. GO GARY!

10:58 p.m. on December 21, 2015 (EST)
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I'm trying to leave the weapon part out of the post. My former job has taken me to some of the world's nastiest places and I've used my hawk as a hammer a step (I wedged it in a Crack to peek over a wall) hunting I've removed the head and used it to skin a deer I've used it as a ula. I don't want to discuss it as a weapon. I think of it as a useful tool. The military did use the Tomahawk from the revolutionary war they were issued then they showed up in WW II and Nam and then recently were issued to Stryker brigades. But in the field hiking it is not gonna be as affective as a axe or a saw . There is a skill behind using one and most don't want or care to learn. Your swings gotta count and you gotta know that no 1 tool is the perfect for every job. A hawk is alot lighter than a axe but a good saw is hard too beat. 

4:29 p.m. on December 22, 2015 (EST)
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Axes of all types are particularly suited for bushcraft and  and zombie apocalypses. It would seem for the backpacker a good saw would out perform the axe of choice for fire wood, especially when you add in the weight difference.

5:21 p.m. on December 22, 2015 (EST)
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dirtwheels.....your right a good saw is probably the best out of all that's been mentioned. There are many ways to process wood and some don't even involve tools. A saw though is safer and I bet uses less energy. I know I'll eventually breakdown and get a silky, I just love hawks and have used one since I was a kid so I've gotten very used to using one but a silky saw is coming soon I think.

3:53 p.m. on December 25, 2015 (EST)
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I see a tomahawk as a tool reserved for car camping, some backcountry camping, or scouting excursions. There are no situations I can think of where I would need a tomahawk as a tool or weapon during a climb. Depending on the location, I carry for protection. All other needs are doubled with other gear. Ice axes, ice tools, etc have hammers on them or an adze that could he useful for cutting. I also carry gear for shelters, fires and food prep, etc. The added weight of the tomahawk would be more nuisance than anything else.

Also, from other posts you've made I know you are relatively new to this site and maybe to some aspects of climbing. I mean this only with respect and with an informative intent. The word protection, or pro for short, in the climbing world means something different than your career experiences. For rock maybe it means a cam or a piton. For ice, an ice screw. For snow, a picket or deadman. These are all essentially pieces of gear that keep the climber from serious falls.

Sorry if it was off topic a little but the other post where I replied before was closed to any more posts.

12:11 p.m. on December 26, 2015 (EST)
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Yeah...I  don't do any climbing so all that talk is way over my head....lol. I don't notice the weight but I've always carried one so I guess I'm used to it. 

7:48 p.m. on December 26, 2015 (EST)
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iClimb said:

Also, from other posts you've made I know you are relatively new to this site and maybe to some aspects of climbing. I mean this only with respect and with an informative intent. The word protection, or pro for short, in the climbing world means something different than your career experiences. For rock maybe it means a cam or a piton. For ice, an ice screw. For snow, a picket or deadman. These are all essentially pieces of gear that keep the climber from serious falls.

 iClimb also left out nuts, chocks, and bolts (which are already in place on sport climbs), as well as the rope itself along with slings and cordelettes.

"keep the climber from serious falls" - well, I dunno about all the pro preventing falls (serious or not), but all the gear is to catch you in case of a fall, serious or not.

Those of us who climb a lot have more than enough to carry - rope(s), hardware (chocks, cams, carabiners, belay devices, etc, etc, etc), tools for ice climbing (ice screws, ice axe, crampons, etc etc).

9:15 p.m. on December 26, 2015 (EST)
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I left out many forms of pro and kept the purpose of pro simple for a reason - the person I posted to is not a climber and I wanted to make it easy to understand. No point in getting too technical with someone if it will just overwhelm them.

9:16 p.m. on December 26, 2015 (EST)
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Also I'd argue that a fall without pro is a helluva lot more serious than one that pro catches.

11:35 p.m. on December 29, 2015 (EST)
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So now let's move onto the more serious hardcore woodlore:  Wha'da y'all think 'bout cami toilet paper?  Does this mean I don't need to burry everything in a cat hole no more?  Some brands are biodegradable, but since it already blends in, does that really even matter?  You can order it over the internet - a four pack is 'bout right for a dayhike after a roadside breakfast of Junior's chili size.

Ed

10:48 p.m. on January 2, 2016 (EST)
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well 2 more hawks landed all the way from Poland and I'm looking at several others for throwing and camping. So I'll see what the new year brings but I'm guessing a few more hawks and some other goodies.

12:12 a.m. on January 17, 2016 (EST)
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Here are my hawks. I finally took a pic!
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7:57 p.m. on January 17, 2016 (EST)
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Wow! Thats a lot of hawks.

I break firewood with rocks and other trees when to big for the fire, or just lay the wood across half way and burn through.

I like a bow saw or hand held small saw for cutting trees like when making primitive shelters.

I used to throw Hawks when I was in my early 20s and was a Mountain Man enthusiast back in the early 80s. Mine were hand made by a local Blacksmith shop in Old Washington AR.

10:03 p.m. on January 17, 2016 (EST)
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I love hawks! the first one in the first line is a forged Mike Deibert absolutely beautiful and great thrower the Netherlands on.down is a 2 hawks and throws nice and has some options I like and the rest are throwers by cold steal and crkt which the crkt are heavy. The rest are helms,Winkler,Graf,another forged mike deibert, a swamp rat KDSH,a blackjack/bark river....and I need more! 

12:15 a.m. on January 18, 2016 (EST)
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alot  of them ride on my body armor , but the cold steel in the front row that's flamed (thanks to a Bic lighter) and lanyard has been my go to for years! It's great when you have down time and want to throw it , sharpen the beard and pop it off the handle you got a ula or karambit and and if the handle breaks it's easy to replace in the field. But I now carry 1 of my Winklers or Helms. I still bring my cold.steel if possible.

11:35 a.m. on January 21, 2016 (EST)
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I'm also a lover of hawks, my favorites being the CRKT Woods Kangee (great if you prefer easily replaceable wooden handles), the Cold Steel Trench Hawk (a little more reach with a longer synthetic handle that will break if you apply too much leverage, but also easily replaceable), and my personal preference being the Estwing full tang Tool Steel Hawk.  The Estwing is lighter than many other hawks (full tang or otherwise), throws well, indestructible, and fits easily in my pack.

Great tools if you don't mind the weight and know how to use them!  Nice hawk collection, by the way!

8:02 p.m. on January 21, 2016 (EST)
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Andrew thanks for the comments. If you didn't notice in the first row the 2 bottom ones are the woods kangee's. the first row from top to bottom are ..... a forged Mike Deibert,a 2hawks, 2 cold steels, the kangees,and a cold steel veitnam hawk. 2nd row the first 4 are Helm forge some have different spikes and sharpened beards, then a Winkler SAYOC, and a Winkler Rogers Ranger Hawk,a blackjack / bark river hawk, a sog, the 3rd row are Mellon tools or graf hawks for the first 3,then another forged mike deibert,then a swamp rat kdsh. and I still want more.

9:13 a.m. on January 22, 2016 (EST)
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You're welcome!  Sir, I believe you may have an addiction, but I completely understand!  You should definitely check out the Estwing hawk, which runs around $40, and you can frequently find it next to the hammers at Home Depot or Lowes.  I believe it'll quickly become a favorite of yours!

5:14 p.m. on January 22, 2016 (EST)
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Andrew I'm sure at some point I'll grab one. As of last night I ordered 1new hawk and 2 knives. Got atleast a month if not longer till they're ready but I couldn't say no. This is supposed to be the year I replenished my firearms as I sold some and others I just want to upgrade, I also have 3-4 suppressors I want and a sbr. So we'll see how much I actually get this year? I probably won't even get half of the guns I want and need.

3:41 a.m. on January 27, 2016 (EST)
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So it looks like cold steel will be putting out a nice hawk made of a solid piece of steel (not sure what steel yet) and CRKT will be coming out with a nice hatchet. I believe that they both will be under $50.00. I've seen the pre order for the cold steel one for $35.00 so ya can't really go wrong there and I forget what the CRKT is gonna sell for. I can't buy anymore Winklers or high dollar hawks because I'm saving for 2 rifles and at least 3 suppressors plus all bells and whistles that go with the rifles. 

6:14 p.m. on February 11, 2016 (EST)
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I'm getting ichy and twitchy since they haven't released the new cold steel hawk yet and $35 I can't lose. I haven't checked on the Colombia river hatchet. I also gotta get the spyderco hawk but it's probably gonna be a just to have hawk because I love spyderco,I just don't see it being a great preformer atleast in the woods but hey I maybe wrong wouldn't be the first time and definitely won't be the last.

6:22 p.m. on February 11, 2016 (EST)
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Am looking forward to the photos Tracker

9:51 p.m. on February 11, 2016 (EST)
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I checked there still on pre order same with the Colombia river hatchet, but tomorrow I'll have my Scrapyard Thick Cut Chop House paid and on its way! So I'll have it next week sometime so I'm super excited about that one. There are so many hawks I want I could spend 2 grand in a hour or less and still not have them all. It's a horrible addiction and when I move and can buy axes it will be even worse. You can tell I'm single because no woman would let me get away with the things I buy....lol

9:33 p.m. on February 12, 2016 (EST)
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Update on Hardcore hardware tomahawks.....They are not made in Australia! They are made in Taiwan in the same factory as Colombia River Knife and Tool. So their marked up prices are not worth it at least to me. I'm not saying things made in Taiwan are junk I just feel a company should give full disclosure as we all spend are hard earned money on things and if it's made in Taiwan just say so . This is just a FYI for yall.

.

7:53 a.m. on February 13, 2016 (EST)
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so I took some better pictures of my high end hawks . 2 are forged buy mike deibert,2 are Winklers, 4 are Helm grinds, 1 is a blackjack/bark river, 3 are Graf knives hawks, 1 is a swamp rat, and one is a 2hawks. I left out anything that was cold steel or CRKT or under $100.
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10:01 p.m. on February 20, 2016 (EST)
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Man waiting on tomahawks is just killing me. I'm waiting on the new cold steel 1, a Graf ,and damn James Helm got some CAD time and did some more designs and I'll be taking all of them especially since one is right up my ally but not ment for the woods and should be more effective at breaking padlocks. I also still need a Beaver Bill hawk and a HB forge and both the GFB hawks, and atleast 1 RMJ probably the eagle talon I think it's called? I'm not big into RMJ no real reason just liked their forged stuff better and when they weren't as popular to the public. I got 1000's invested in hawks and will put 1000's more into them. It's hard to pick which one makes a trip obviously not one like my Winkler sayoc since it's anti personnel. I've come to the conclusion that a hawk and a knife are a must for me nothing else will do...lol.

8:27 a.m. on February 21, 2016 (EST)
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That's quite the collection Tracker congratulations and when I need Hawk advice I know who to ask.

9:49 p.m. on February 21, 2016 (EST)
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Old Guide..those are just the ones that are 100 and over. I'm always happy to help with hawk advice and no you don't got to spend 100 to get a good hawk....lol. I have 1 that is 815 alone! I didn't pay that the maker knew what I did for a living and we worked out a deal. Throwing a hawk is alot of fun too and you can use them to dress game if you take the hawk head off or use it as a ula there is alot you can do with one also if the beard is sharpened it can work as a karambit.

10:14 p.m. on February 21, 2016 (EST)
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My Scrapyard Thick Cut Chop House and Swamp Rat KDSH . you can look the KDSH on YouTube and they cut a car in half with it.

8:27 p.m. on February 24, 2016 (EST)
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i hate waiting on knives and hawks to be released I'm going nuts waiting! Gotta order 3 sheaths too but I'm thinking about taking all my hawks that have leather sheaths and sending them off to my kydex maker, but it would be 11 hawks out of 19 and with the new ones once I get them that would add atleast 3 more. I know my kydex maker would be o so happy...lol. I eventually am gonna do a review of my kydex maker Alwelke you don't got to send your knife or hawk to them only if they don't have the knife or pattern and there is a list of all the brands and knives and hawks they have in stock but if it's not listed don't hesitate to get in touch with AL really friendly and helpful.

3:06 a.m. on February 25, 2016 (EST)
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I want to correct my kydex maker is Azwelke I spelled it wrong.

11:41 p.m. on March 5, 2016 (EST)
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Well I don't know what hawk or who makes it but I do know it's none of the Hawks I have listed but 1 was custom ordered for me by a friend and it is gonna be hand forged and hit the anvil last Monday that's all I get to know.So needless to say I'm really stoked.

7:46 p.m. on March 15, 2016 (EDT)
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I'm really hoping this mystery hawk is done soon. It's driving me nuts.

5:02 p.m. on March 17, 2016 (EDT)
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Not much for me to chop up here.

8:58 p.m. on March 17, 2016 (EDT)
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Jeff I'd have to agree I can't think where a hawk would be of use there. Sure looks pretty there though!

6:00 p.m. on March 19, 2016 (EDT)
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This coming week I'll be getting a HB Forge Shawnee hawk and maybe this mystery hawk. I'll also be getting a tops knife or knives the 10/47 or the tac-tops karambit. I gotta slow down and pay a bill of and I'm doing it in 3 months starting in April so ill be holding off for a bit.

6:10 p.m. on March 21, 2016 (EDT)
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Good to see how enthusiastic you are about that tool but let's face it 99.999 % of people going for a walk in the bush don't need it.

I thought that this comment was rather telling :

"The hawk has been around longer than any of us and will probably still be around long after I'm gone so that does say something  "

that is true but so is this :


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but you don't see many of those strapped on the back of a pack, do you ?

(Jeff however should have one with him, except not THAT one...)

I posted the above just in case some beginner (this  is the beginners section) strts to think you need one of the hawks to hike.

Anyway for those keen on building a fire (but not into survival/bushcraft stuff) in most cases a folding pruning saw will be more useful.

Something like this :


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14", under 5 oz.

4:20 a.m. on March 22, 2016 (EDT)
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Franco  I do see your point but I see it as a needed tool. I'd also say atleast 90% of hawk owners use them incorrectly. You don't always need a 1st aid kit but it's nice to know it's there, I feel the same with a tomahawk. Sure they have drawbacks but for as light and all the uses they have I'll always have one on me. They are not a beginners tool that's for sure.

I don't see why I'd need a shovel 

I also admitted to the usefulness of a saw and I was probably gonna grab a silky soon.

There is just certain gear that some carry that others don't get and would never need, and that's fine the point is to have fun and make it home in one piece

. My way isn't always the best way but it works for me.

10:51 a.m. on March 22, 2016 (EDT)
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Is there a record for highest percentage of posts in any thread by just one person? 

 

"I do see your point but I see it as a needed tool."

 

Since 90% of us don't use them and have successfully backpacked for years, decades, ad more, I would say that it's pretty clear that you can go backpacking without one.  That means it is optional, not needed. 

3:34 p.m. on March 22, 2016 (EDT)
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Yes...I get his point , but I see it as a needed tool and that's my opinion. What's wrong with that? Some may carry a hatchet or saw or nothing. I don't understand why you would come and start asking about highest percentage of posts by one.person? Unless your just trying to be a jerk, then your doing a fine job and should.be proud.of yourself.

They have also become more popular in the past few years too....and alot of people have them but 90% probably don't understand how to use them effectively and waste alot of energy banging away with one.

I never said 90% don't use them, they just may not be using them correctly........you really need to read and comprehend what your reading. Judging by your other posts you seem to have a hard time with a map or getting  to the lakes and places you want to be so I don't hold much value in your opinions or skills. 

Now please let's keep this civil. If you have a issue with me send me a message and let's keep it out of the forums please.

5:34 p.m. on March 22, 2016 (EDT)
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I do see your point but I see it as a needed tool


yes you do but again I want to make the point that it isn't a needed tool for hiking it is only needed (sort of) if you are into bushcraft/survival not for general hiking.

 

11:08 p.m. on March 22, 2016 (EDT)
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11:08 p.m. on March 22, 2016 (EDT)
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It's just my opinion that's it , I also carry a 45 and a 1st aid kit .I hope I don't need any of them but I got them . I think I've made it clear that they aren't for everyone and have drawbacks.

Why would they be good for only survival and bushcraft? Take the head off you have a ula and can prep meals or skin a buck, make kindling with ease, have a bit of fun and throw them while hanging out at camp, drive a stake in, pound a wooden wedge in to a larger log to split it.

They aren't for everyone especially if you don't know how to use one or never used one. This is just my opinion and attempt to try and have a decent conversation about them.

When am I gonna need a shovel and saw on a general hike, I don't recall saying anything about taking it on a general hike but it's a piece of gear that shouldn't be overlooked....I do carry mine on day hikes though. 

Again this is just a need for me. 

11:14 p.m. on March 22, 2016 (EDT)
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Gary that's a really cool axe! I can't wait till I'm out of an apt and somewhere with a fireplace. I got a list a mile long of axes I want and that one just made it on the list.

11:21 p.m. on March 22, 2016 (EDT)
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I don't carry a hatchet, ax or a saw. I either break wood or burn it as is. Its just that I travel by bicycle and foot as light as possible. Usually I all I carry is my pack, tent, sleeping bag and pad, I carry a stove for area's where fires are not allowed or wood is scarce. So my basic packed weight without food and water is about 12 lbs.

12:09 a.m. on March 23, 2016 (EDT)
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Gary my hawks are all light. The traditional ones are about 1lb . It would suprise you how light they are compared to what they look like the would weigh. My CRKT hawks are my heaviest at I believe around 2lbs. There are much safer ways to get wood for a fire,when you add a blade your chance of injury increases. Tomahawks can and will slip and twist and do funny things and a glancing blow is the worst. So they by far are the perfect tool. Alot of fun to throw I can't stress how fun it is..lol!

11:45 a.m. on March 23, 2016 (EDT)
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tracker clayton 2 said:

......., have a bit of fun and throw them while hanging out at camp, drive a stake in, pound a wooden wedge in to a larger log to split it.

 Yes, everyone is entitled to their opinions, amusements, and practices ... as long as they do not involve causing harm to other people, animals, or the environment. I trust that you practice LNT principles (and USFS, NPS, and Native rules) and are not using living trees as your targets when you play with your hawks.

Having grown up in the middle of the Sonora Desert on a reservation, I have a couple hawks. Since there are far better ways to prepare fuel for fires, they are only used these days during re-enactments.

Franco, Balzacom, and Gary all have a lot of experience in the woods and hills (though not as much as my 3/4 century). You would do well to give deep consideration to their comments. Times have changed. Yes, games and play are fun (in an appropriate setting). But as they and others here on Trailspace have noted, such practices and gear are no longer appropriate for the vast majority of people venturing into the backcountry.

  - OGBO

1:01 p.m. on March 23, 2016 (EDT)
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When out for recreation, I am fine without any kind of major cutting tool and have been so for the past five decades.  Doing SAR in SE Arizona, I and my group occasionally found a hatchet or saw useful for clearing a helicopter LZ.  As an archaeologist, I am familiar with a shovel in the back country - also handy when on the fire line (with a sharpened blade, it is extremely versatile.)

I have lost count of the number of fires I have built, using dead wood collected without any kind of cutting tool.  They burned quite hot and prepared grub just fine....

1:59 p.m. on March 23, 2016 (EDT)
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Don, good point - whatever works for the user is just fine. Sometimes I enjoy pulling some widget or tool and using it for old times sake and the memories it brings. Like my 4x5 studio camera - makes fantastic photos, but it means having to deal with all the chemicals, getting the enlarger out, and somehow blocking up all the light leaks in the bathroom, since I haven't had a dedicated darkroom in several decades. Still there is the thrill of the creative art of chemical photography, doing dodging and burning by waving one's hands. Just like up on Arastradero Road, there is a guy who collects logs, then stands by the road using a hatchet to create carved wooden bears to sell to passersby - mostly sequoia, but a lot of oak and beech as well.

At the same time, electronics has improved to the point that a tiny electronic camera can produce extremely beautiful images in the hands of someone of high talent - even though the vast majority of images from "smart" phones and even pro-am SDLRs are mostly trash - that's ok, though, if they bring back good memories for the family

3:31 p.m. on March 23, 2016 (EDT)
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Bill S  I can always find a stump,or log to throw at. There are also dead trees but I use them as a last resort , hawks don't seem to like to stick in them atleast when they are really dry.

At 37 having spent growing up in the foothills of at Appalachians and have been in the woods alot myself and carried one around the world and since I was I kid I don't think anyone is gonna change my opinion on this one.

As far as appropriate for the backcountry I'd strongly disagree and who decides what's appropriate or not ? If you want to hual it then what's the issue ?

6:11 p.m. on March 23, 2016 (EDT)
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Bill S said:

tracker clayton 2 said:

......., have a bit of fun and throw them while hanging out at camp, drive a stake in, pound a wooden wedge in to a larger log to split it.

 Yes, everyone is entitled to their opinions, amusements, and practices ... as long as they do not involve causing harm to other people, animals, or the environment. I trust that you practice LNT principles (and USFS, NPS, and Native rules) and are not using living trees as your targets when you play with your hawks.

Having grown up in the middle of the Sonora Desert on a reservation, I have a couple hawks. Since there are far better ways to prepare fuel for fires, they are only used these days during re-enactments.

Franco, Balzacom, and Gary all have a lot of experience in the woods and hills (though not as much as my 3/4 century). You would do well to give deep consideration to their comments. Times have changed. Yes, games and play are fun (in an appropriate setting). But as they and others here on Trailspace have noted, such practices and gear are no longer appropriate for the vast majority of people venturing into the backcountry.

  - OGBO

 Hi Bill.  3/4 of a century.  My dad was a state park ranger while I grew up, so I started small (my first trip was before I turned 1) but I'm still about ten years behind you...

6:16 p.m. on March 23, 2016 (EDT)
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"I don't think anyone is gonna change my opinion on this one."

Don't change your mind but don't try to convince others that it is cool to cut down trees and throw your hawk around, particularly throwing them at living trees, "for fun".

Your kind of fun is selfish and well out of date.

7:41 p.m. on March 23, 2016 (EDT)
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bz, here's a photo of me riding with my mother at something less than 1 (haven't been able to trace down when the photo was taken, other than that I was less than 1 yo


hors10mo.gif
She grew up on a ranch, so was very much into the outdoors. My father homesteaded near the reservation where I and my kid sister were born. Walk out the back door and in 100 yards you were in untouched Nature of the desert variety.  We had to supply our food from the garden, the chickens, rabbits, and turkeys we raised, plus hunting game (still have my father's shotgun and 30-30). Learned to drive the tractor when I was 7 and the pickup at about 8, though I preferred horses (still do, but I can't afford to keep them in the SFBay Area.

Ever notice how some people believe they are at the top of the food chain and how they and their kin were born to "rule the world and control Nature"? They believe that they know everything and tell the rest of the world how great they are. But every so often they violate Nature's rules and pay the price.

8:01 p.m. on March 23, 2016 (EDT)
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Hi Bill 

Good post.

A couple of years ago  I started to look after (part time) and play with a friend's  horses and found out I get on very well with them.

took me a while to figure out it was because  I sort of grew up with them , my grandparents were still high country farmers and had a couple of largish plough horses till I was around 12 and my father used to have a team of mules so whenever he spotted a horse/mule/donkey we would approach them.

An early memory of mine is of my brother and myself , aged around 6, on top of a large hay cart pulled by a white horse on the way back to the barn (only because there is a photo of that) 

I could light a fire and cook for myself from around 6, we had wood burning stoves both in "town" as well as up in the mountain in some places it was just an open fireplace .

So at 60 plus I am pretty good still at making fires but no I don't need or want tools in the bush to do that. (I carry a Mora in winter)

Not that I do build a fire very often anyway...

8:27 p.m. on March 23, 2016 (EDT)
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That's a great photo Bill!  Since we are sharing, here are a couple of mine:

 

At Donner Lake taking a bath on the porch of our ranger's cabin, age about 18 mos:

s_7abcl6pgy1196.jpg

 

And there's the whole family--I'm the smallest one standing.  In 1954

 

s_7abcl6pgy1192.jpg

 

 

10:01 p.m. on March 23, 2016 (EDT)
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Franco I never said to throw at living trees or to cut them down? Where did you get that from?  

I actually name my targets for Bill S

Some of you need to read what I've posted and comprehend the post because it's obvious people aren't  and this thread is getting derailed . 

So Franco maybe your comment about being selfish and out dated was uncalled for? 

10:19 p.m. on March 23, 2016 (EDT)
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And this thread is about tomahawks not horses and baths from your younger days .....I'd like a MOD to step in and get rid of some of these off topic posts!

December 16, 2018
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