9 hours hiking backpack size?

12:03 a.m. on June 6, 2016 (EDT)
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Hi,

So I already invest in 45l backpack for weekend hikes, I will go to a trip were we will be camping and from there have a 9 hours hiking and back, I do not want to take  my 45 backpack with me for those 9 hours because sounds kind of stupid, so I´m debating myself into getting a 15l or a 22, honestly I feel I would be fine with the 15 one and I do not need the extra space of the 22, but I do not have a lot of experience in this area, so what is your opinion? I would be carrying a 2.5 - 3 water camelback no matter the size, and this will be during the summer in hot conditions. Thanks!

9:18 a.m. on June 6, 2016 (EDT)
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A belt pack would work with your camelback.

2:57 p.m. on June 6, 2016 (EDT)
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Yes a 45L pack is overkill for a dayhike, but another way of looking at it is that you don't have to spend the money to have a specialized piece of gear for each variation in conditions you will face. You won't have much in your pack for a dayhike so the weight isn't an issue. If you think you will have more such hikes in the future then I agree to look for a pack better suited to that need, but if it's just for an occasional need then yes you could get something new but nothing wrong with using what you have and keeping the money in your pocket. That would sound pretty smart to some people, not stupid at all.

4:51 p.m. on June 7, 2016 (EDT)
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Thats a really good point JR, thanks for the input 

10:43 a.m. on June 11, 2016 (EDT)
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I use a 22l pack for 3-season day hikes, and a 28l in the winter. With 3l bladder, rain gear, down sweater, first aid kit, food/snacks, bug spray, etc, I don't think I've ever had the 22l stuffed full. It does have 2 huge mesh pouches on the outside that are perfect for rain gear (especially when wet), and daisy chain loops. My 28l pack has been stuffed to the point that I'd have to put more gear in the back compartment with the hydration bladder (which I don't like to do in case of leaks) if I ever needed to carry avalanche gear, but I'm very warm-blooded so I almost always carry my fleece or down sweater in the pack because even at -15F/-26C or so I get too warm snowshoeing while wearing them. People who aren't abnormal would most likely be wearing them LOL. So going by my own experience a 45l would be excessive for a long day hike, but that's what compression straps are for. Of course, you'll probably be going on more day hikes, and someone is ALWAYS having a sale....

1:42 p.m. on June 11, 2016 (EDT)
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Everyone is so different here, but i guess a relevant question would be.... What are you carrying during your day hike? Are you snacking, or cooking meals? Are you obtaining water on your way, or leaving with it? Are you in the mountains where weather changes at the drop of a hat or somewhere where the climate is a bit more stable? These i think rae important questions for a day pack, as is the same questions for a long distance pack. Personally I love my 30L REI FLASH. Its an ultralight pack... so if you choose to put nothing in it, it still fits good and is not flopping all over. In the same sentence, i use this same pack for week long trips in the summer and fall and all packed up( 14-16lbs ) it does just fine also. But i think JR made a good point. You can certainly use your 45l, and it will be the lightest your pack will ever be. Will save you some money, and space that you would use carrying a second pack. But again something like a 30l really opens up options. at least for me personally. 

1:26 a.m. on June 13, 2016 (EDT)
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Thanks for your comments! 

I did some thinking and I finally got the Osprey Syncro 15 Hydration Pack, I got it for almost half of the price in a really good sale, I practice MTB too so that helped me to justify the purchase, LOL, I will let you guys know how it works for hiking. 

The 30L REI FLASH sounded great but REI doesn't sell it anymore, of course there are similar products. I saw the REI Stuff Travel Daypack and the REI Trail 30, probably I will get one of those for one day hike during the winter, its true I can always use my 45 Osprey but I was looking something to carry the essentials, while I leave the rest of the stuff in my tent, and not taking everything out and just put the essential back to it, the bad thing about the Syncro is that is not foldable so I will have to attach it to the 45, the good thing is that it comes already with the 2.5 water reservoir and the raincover.

1:36 p.m. on June 15, 2016 (EDT)
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Just an idea... but if your 45l has a spot for a hydration bladder... since you have one in your 15l, will your pack fit in the spot intended for the bladder in the 45L? 

3:55 p.m. on June 16, 2016 (EDT)
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Some people love to talk about equipment and acquire a quiver of packs. I believe I have one pack that will work for everything. It is a ULA circuit made in Utah. Big enough for long trips and light enough for a day trip.

5:29 p.m. on June 25, 2016 (EDT)
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Went on a day hike Thursday on the PCT. The Circuit is more comfortable than any day pack I have ever used.  It has pockets on both sides of the waist belt. Water bottles go on the outside of the pack and can be reached without taking the pack off.  Water bottles can be mounted on the pack straps. I give it an A.

8:22 a.m. on June 26, 2016 (EDT)
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clearly, you could go either way and chose to add a relatively inexpensive, smaller and somewhat lighter option.  my only complaint about some of the really small backpacks is that some aren't great at handling abuse - lighter pack, lighter materials, seams and fabrics more likely to fail.

enjoy it!

quick note on the one size fits all - it can work well if your hiking gear is lightweight.  i could see the ULA Circuit and some of the other light options, like from Granite Gear, or going a tad heavier Boreas, for longer trips - if i could keep my pack weight to around 30 pounds.  more than that, i could see using the Circuit for some purposes and a larger backpack for others.  only caveat to that might be a McHale pack, though the cost is beyond what many can justify.  if i ever hit the lottery.....

11:15 p.m. on June 26, 2016 (EDT)
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So I tried the Uriah idea but because of the shape and construction of both backpacks it didn't work.

I already did a 2 hours "test" hike with the Osprey Syncro 15 Hydration Pack, almost with everything I will be carrying and it was perfect, is really lightweight, and easy access to water bottles, the only thing I miss was the pockets in the waist belt, I guess I could always use a belt pack if I ever need the extra space, my real trip is coming up soon, I´m heading to palo duro in texas, I will let you guys know how it goes.

3:31 p.m. on June 27, 2016 (EDT)
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You could try checking into a place that custom makes pack for hip belt pockets that you could just attach for the day? Hyper LIght Mountain Gear and ZPACKS both offer these on the side for relatively inexpensive. Then its just a matter of figuring how to attach them i suppose. Happy Trails 

6:02 p.m. on June 27, 2016 (EDT)
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Thanks for the tip!

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