Tips for inclement weather?

5:03 p.m. on September 26, 2016 (EDT)
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Hi all,

I'm new to camping and I'm going with a friend to Padre Island during hurricane season. I have invested a lot of money into a 4-season tent because I wanted something heavy duty to withstand higher wind speeds and errant debris. Essentially, I'll be hurricane camping if at all possible and I wanted to get tips from people here who have tried that before.

I'm looking for recommendations on stakes, tie-downs, etc. Basically any essentials I might need to make it through anything up to a category 5. I can post more about my existing gear if that helps. Thanks all.

-Bob

8:37 p.m. on September 26, 2016 (EDT)
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I have some friends who lived in Florida that camped on the beach through hurricane Andrew. They actually lashed styrofoam blocks around their tent poles and floated out the storm surge by setting a danforth anchor they had chained to the tent. My buddy said it was like sleeping on a waterbed and not a drop of moisture got inside the tent. They had their surfboareds in the tent with them and once the eye passed over they hopped in the water and caught some of those big fat eye wall barrells. The key is getting a solid four season and then outfitting it to float. Those tents are made to withstand Mount Everest which has the harshest wind on earth. The tough part really is getting your buoyancy just right and then making sure you don't get blown out to sea. A good anchor set into the sand and a SOLID four season should technically take you through anything the beach can throw at you just don't do something dumb like pitch under a power line or anything and you'll be fine. Hope you get a big one seasons nearly over. Take pics! 

8:44 p.m. on September 26, 2016 (EDT)
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You're new to camping and you want to camp on an island with a maximum elevation of 6' in a cat5 hurricane? Respectfully, this is an exceedingly bad idea.

Or you're a troll.

9:00 p.m. on September 26, 2016 (EDT)
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Thanks Keith! I have read that the water levels can flood the area during a hurricane, which is why I didn't want to take a vehicle down there. My plan was to get dropped off near Port Mansfield with a Jon boat rental..I'm renting because I'm not from the coast and don't own one. But aside from that, I own all my own gear. 

If the situation gets too bad, I can bail and ride the surge back into the mainland from the port. But I digress. The main thing I wanted tips on was how to outfit the tent as a backup plan and I think Keith hit the nail on the head.

JR this is definitely not a troll comment. I'm just trying to cover all my bases before executing on this plan and keep safety at the forefront. I have a lot of experience with swift water rescues so I know my way around heavy currents and emergencies, I just don't know the ins and outs of outfitting tents for catastrophic weather type situations. 

9:24 p.m. on September 26, 2016 (EDT)
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Just make sure you pay out enough anchor line to avoid sinking the tent. You also want to camp outside the Surfline. Any four season can handle the wind no problem but crashing waves can break metal boats so be smart on your set up. A high dune is probably ideal as a perch to anchor if the surge is a major factor.

BTW no offense to anyone but it always cracks me up when the geriatric crowd tries to warn away the kids from big bad Mother Nature as though the storm is an enemy to be feared or something. We've camped on the moon grandpa what's a hurricane gunna do to a space age tent? seeing the eye of a hurricane firsthand is supposed to be like seeing God. I'm not afraid to risk it to be closer to my God because i believe go big or go home as a way of life. Good luck Bob keep us posted! 

12:21 a.m. on September 27, 2016 (EDT)
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seeing the eye of a hurricane firsthand is supposed to be like seeing God.

I always thought LSD was like seeing god.........

1:16 a.m. on September 27, 2016 (EDT)
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I was thinking about bagging tent anchors... but seeing God? That might be one of the few things beyond HEAT, that'll keep me off trail!

Happy Days On The Trail Bob!

2:53 a.m. on September 27, 2016 (EDT)
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Keith Springer said:

BTW no offense to anyone but it always cracks me up when the geriatric crowd tries to warn away the kids from big bad Mother Nature as though the storm is an enemy to be feared or something. We've camped on the moon grandpa what's a hurricane gunna do to a space age tent?

No offense taken, here, but I think many from whatever your generation would take offense as you seem to allude that wisdom only comes with age... 

The difference between the Moon Program and your project is they assessed their risks and tested their concepts under controlled conditions, whereas you are basically yahoo winging it.

I don't care what tent you head out with, none are designed to deal with flying tree limbs and roof shingles, not to mention flying trees and house roofs.  Thus given the objective of your project I suggest you base your tent design on a submarine, then fortify it until you can convince a mariner to hunker down with you.  Good luck with that.  But I must admit, it makes a good fantasy challenge.  One thing those who actually have found themselves pitted against extreme nature will advise: she is impossible to over estimate, that her finest hours will be more than you bargain for.

Nevertheless we wish you a safe adventure.

Ed

7:07 a.m. on September 27, 2016 (EDT)
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Funny thing is, I actually have a cousin who works near NASA in the Houston area. He's not with the space program but he was an engineer for Motorola and when I told him about the plan, he said my best bet would be HAM RADIO. If the tent anchor line snaps in a swell or if the Jon boat capsized, a radio is my only lifeline. But honestly, if I capsized in the storm surge, there's no way a HAM is going to stay dry for very long. Plus legally speaking, don't I need a radio license to broadcast with a HAM? CB would be legal, but that's only a mile or two at best. Either way, I don't even see the point if the radio is wet. I'd probably be better off with extra food and water than hauling electronics down there. I'm trying to keep trip expenses low as well, so please keep that in mind. 

9:06 a.m. on September 27, 2016 (EDT)
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I think it is great that these two folks created accounts just to discuss this issue here. I'd never even heard of tidal camping before, but all it took was one person's curiosity to shake loose an expert hiding in our midst. How majestic it must be to float yourself to sleep on the rising storm surge.

As an older outdoorsman who might be interested in taking up this sport I am curious about what sort of line adjusters you use to keep the proper amount of anchor line played out. Seems keeping above water without floating down range with the surge would require setting a watch to keep the lines trimmed properly. Does this sort of camping require a crew or can a solo tent-captain manage well enough on his own? You're never too old to  learn I always say so I'm looking forward to hearing more about this!!1

10:18 a.m. on September 27, 2016 (EDT)
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After you come across the bridge you hit the Hotels...I believe the camping area is the other end of the island...That's over 5 miles away to the camping area's...

I grew up on the Jersey shore as a teen...The last thing i would do would be camping during a hurricane. I understand the curiosity but I rather watch that on the TV...I also know what it's like to be flooded do to a Hurricane or Red tide..

I never heard of Tidal camping..Camping on a beach during some storms that popped up yes...But not a hurricane...

8:48 p.m. on September 27, 2016 (EDT)
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Keith Springer said:

Just make sure you pay out enough anchor line to avoid sinking the tent. You also want to camp outside the Surfline. Any four season can handle the wind no problem but crashing waves can break metal boats so be smart on your set up. A high dune is probably ideal as a perch to anchor if the surge is a major factor.

BTW no offense to anyone but it always cracks me up when the geriatric crowd tries to warn away the kids from big bad Mother Nature as though the storm is an enemy to be feared or something. We've camped on the moon grandpa what's a hurricane gunna do to a space age tent? seeing the eye of a hurricane firsthand is supposed to be like seeing God. I'm not afraid to risk it to be closer to my God because i believe go big or go home as a way of life. Good luck Bob keep us posted! 

 Geriatric here mind filming it for us we ain't able to get out of the rockers. And could use something exciting to watch.

now one time I was in my 30ft camper in 60 plus mph wind when the roof came off my brothers shed and flew like a frisbee it was about 16 x 12 2x4 frame then the awning above his pouch ripped off and went flying and since there was no danger of drowning I ran right out to save the night. Bad move on my part there was so much flying thru the air hitting me I simply retreated back inside course the camper was rocking so bad it got me much closer to my God it's called prayer.

i suggest you try it 1st course if your hell bent on the other way us geriatric rocker types would sure appreciate you filming it why heck it would probably keep us on the edge of our seats you know living dangerously on the edge

6:52 a.m. on September 28, 2016 (EDT)
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Bobbie, what four season tent did you buy?

10:12 a.m. on September 28, 2016 (EDT)
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Back when I was a callow youth, I lived for a few years in Mississippi. We had several hurricanes during that time, including a couple of the all-time super storms. Luckily, I was far enough inland that the damage we sustained was minimal and repairable both times. But I had friends who were right on the coast - both of them beachfront in Biloxi, one with a house  on Cat Island. both their houses in Biloxi were heavily damaged, as were many of their neighbors. The house on Cat which was used as a vacation house was basically washed to sea, with only the concrete foundation left - pretty much the same with every building on Cat the same. Many people both on shore and on Cat. IIRC, there were no survivors on Cat.

If you look back just a year or two and look at what happened in Lousian, you will see what happens in hurricanes. No one down there is insane enough to even try a tent, though some are attached enough to their homes to chance staying in their houses in hurricanes. If buildings can't survive, there is no way in hell that any tent will survive.

As the old saying goes - been there done that.

10:28 a.m. on September 28, 2016 (EDT)
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Patman said:

Bobbie, what four season tent did you buy?

 

Patman, I'll be taking my Hilleberg Tarra (Outdoor Gear Lab's top pick) My plan was to camp inside a bowl between the dunes, allowing them to absorb the full force of the wind. This way the tent won't take the brunt of it. If I use the STRYROFOAM rigging like Keith recommended, I can still anchor to the top of a dune and float out the storm, or like I mentioned, Jon boat back to the coast. Which reminds me, I still need a bilge pump.

I realize there's a lot of debris out on the island but most of it will be swept away within the first few minutes of storm, which is why I feel relatively safe from debris puncturing the tent (and me). Plus, I can reinforce the windward side with plywood as an extra precaution. I think the main issues will be 1) flooding and 2) waves. So flotation and pitching outside the surf-line are paramount.

11:08 a.m. on September 28, 2016 (EDT)
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Keith Springer said:

BTW no offense to anyone but it always cracks me up when the geriatric crowd tries to warn away the kids from big bad Mother Nature as though the storm is an enemy to be feared or something. We've camped on the moon grandpa what's a hurricane gunna do to a space age tent? seeing the eye of a hurricane firsthand is supposed to be like seeing God. I'm not afraid to risk it to be closer to my God because i believe go big or go home as a way of life. Good luck Bob keep us posted! 

 Big bad Mother Nature is our Mother for sure but she offers warnings to the prudent backpacker.  She allows us to seek out safer locations in suitable spots and still ride out her best events.

I equate a hurricane to a tornado and I've camped in two tornadoes over the years, one in the mountains of North Carolina in 1996 and one recently near Chattanooga in 2011.

Point is, I heard the warnings while I was out on my little Sangean radio and took appropriate steps:  Got off the high ground, set up near a rock cliff face to avoid falling trees etc.  Miss Nature wants us to see her best but expects us to use common sense.  Why?  So we can live thru her storms in order to live and go out tomorrow.

Seeing God in nature is very easy.  Get rattlesnake bit and you'll see God and you won't even have to wait for a hurricane

2:20 p.m. on September 28, 2016 (EDT)
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2:23 p.m. on September 28, 2016 (EDT)
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You know if the baby boomers were in charge of outdoor adventures we would all be forced to "camp" in places with cabins. If people sat around on the beach crying about the danger no one would have ever surfed jaws. People are pushing limits all the time. If some freak accident did occur while I was camping it would be a hell of a lot more exciting than a heart attack on the couch. My pic is a tropical storm setup from a couple of years ago on St Jose island. You can see the storm in the background building.Had a GoPro but ended up losing it once the surge hit us. We had to climb up that day marker tower and ride out the gale fully open. It was totally awesome but I wish I had brought a four season tidal setup instead it was costly losing everything. I did catch some radical waves that day.

It's funny how I come on here to get some advice on actual camping and find instead a bunch of old men rattling their canes at me. Tidal hurricane camping has been going on for years and years all along the gulf coast. What I've discovered here is that real outdoorsmen with real experience probably avoid the trail space bingo hour blog.

Bob forget the John Boat get an ocean kayak and tie it off to your tent it's the best way. You can also forget the comms. once you have anything bigger than a cat 1 on the beach you can pretty much forget rescue and that ham radio is just going to be more weight. Practice practice practice and plot out the storm path early so you're not pitching in 50 plus knots. 

2:52 p.m. on September 28, 2016 (EDT)
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FYI tidal tent camping on the beach is way safer than stuck in a fixed wood shelter. you're very unlikely to be struck by debris moving in with the storm from the ocean on the open beach.  We have plenty of old man and the sea tales here as to why "cabin" camping in a beach or a shoreline house is actually much more dangerous than a solid four season tidal setup but I get that it's hard for some people to leave the refridgerator and feather mattress behind for the safety of A solid tidal camp. Just do what FEMA tells you like all the other sheeplebots

3:18 p.m. on September 28, 2016 (EDT)
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Keith Springer said:

You know if the baby boomers were in charge of outdoor adventures we would all be forced to "camp" in places with cabins.

It's funny how I come on here to get some advice on actual camping and find instead a bunch of old men rattling their canes at me. Tidal hurricane camping has been going on for years and years all along the gulf coast. What I've discovered here is that real outdoorsmen with real experience probably avoid the trail space bingo hour blog.

 I'm a baby boomer backpacker and I have a low regard for car campers (and cabins), so let's hope when you seek out these tidal hurricane camping spots you spent 4 days with a full pack hiking there and DID NOT drive nearby or get dropped off for quick access and easy camp setup.  In my opinion such access would make you unwilling to walk long distances with some weight.

Maybe you could share with us some blogs of backpackers reporting their trips doing tidal hurricane camping.  I could find nothing on it after a cursory google search---

https://www.google.com/#q=tidal+hurricane+camping

I highlight your last sentence and must say a handful of us here on Trailspace have more bag nights in wilderness areas than you will ever get no matter how long you live.  And we have faced blizzards and -30F ambients and high winds and rising waters and dangerous creek crossings and pit vipers and 100 lb packs.  Catch up to us if you can.

4:15 p.m. on September 28, 2016 (EDT)
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I found several discussions about camping in a hurricane at outdoorbasecamp.com, scoutbook.com, and even on trailspace.com. I tried posting all the links but I get this message:

In order to prevent spam, you are not allowed to link to external websites.

4:43 p.m. on September 28, 2016 (EDT)
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Bobby Sundown Preis said:

I found several discussions about camping in a hurricane at outdoorbasecamp.com, scoutbook.com, and even on trailspace.com. I tried posting all the links but I get this message:

In order to prevent spam, you are not allowed to link to external websites.

 Bobby when you new you have a time period when you can't post Links..This is also your first post...But I think you posted the names of sites where we can look them up. Just cause I never heard of something doesn't mean it doesn't happen...

6:23 p.m. on September 28, 2016 (EDT)
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I checked out Outdoorbasecamp.com and it seems to be a site dedicated to RV "camping", or so-called camping.  I punched in "hurricane camping" in the search function and found nothing. After using "hurricane" in the forum section I found several threads.

http://www.outdoorbasecamp.com/forum/threads/camping-in-a-hurricane.10261/#post-81477

http://www.outdoorbasecamp.com/forum/threads/for-all-of-us-east-coasters-facing-the-approaching-hurricane.9731/

Remember, this site is about camping in popups and RVs and I found very little about tent camping in a hurricane, except for this quote from someone named ChadTower:

"No tent is going to save you from flying debris. Fold up and go somewhere safe."

And the Scoutbook site looked difficult to navigate and difficult to find anything about hurricane camping, plus it appears to be a Pay Site.

6:49 p.m. on September 28, 2016 (EDT)
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@ keith springer... Love the pic of the tent under the tower, was this the setup for the last Ride the Lightning camp you went on? I'm always pleased to see people jump on a site with a trolling msg then start name calling! I am currently working on a straw hut to take camping in Tornado Alley... Any words of wisdom?

May natural selection go easy on ya!

7:03 p.m. on September 28, 2016 (EDT)
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Hey Joe in case you didn't notice we ran a grounding wire under the tarp not to mention the structure itself is equipped with a lightening rod. Once we got swamped by the surge that night there were a couple of strikes while we were topside but I felt nothing more than a tingle. On my next hurricane trip instead of an actual picture of my campsite I'll try to just bring back stories of some guy I know whose cabin was torn down. Then we can all join together and cry about how dangerous it is to go outside. 

7:08 p.m. on September 28, 2016 (EDT)
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check out the movie twister. Jodie foster outfits a van capable of surviving an F5. im sure you'll manage if youre an actual camper and not some silly codger taking the piss. i mean it when I say good luck living life. More people should try it. Seriously had no idea so many trolls were on camping websites Jesus wtf 

7:15 p.m. on September 28, 2016 (EDT)
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Keith Springer said:

check out the movie twister. Jodie foster outfits a van capable of surviving an F5. im sure you'll manage if youre an actual camper and not some silly codger taking the piss. i mean it when I say good luck living life. More people should try it. Seriously had no idea so many trolls were on camping websites Jesus wtf 

 Hajajahahahahahaha

7:16 p.m. on September 28, 2016 (EDT)
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Keith Springer said:

check out the movie twister. Jodie foster outfits a van capable of surviving an F5. im sure you'll manage if youre an actual camper and not some silly codger taking the piss. i mean it when I say good luck living life. More people should try it. Seriously had no idea so many trolls were on camping websites Jesus wtf 

 Hajajahahahahaha

hey keith welcome to trail space

looking forward to you teaching us how

7:24 p.m. on September 28, 2016 (EDT)
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lesson one: don't try and recreate your living room at a cabin somewhere off the highway. Get outside unplug from yelling at kids who love to camp and *actually experience some life 

7:43 p.m. on September 28, 2016 (EDT)
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Now getting back to the original post I think the best approach would be a fully inflated dingy under the tent with retactable wings and a parachute would definitely be a plus and maybe some Kevlar body armor and a weather vane with an insulated trailing ground wire 

as to the tent I believe it would probably be great in a blizzard but not sure about those conditions 

and one locactor beacon might be in order

8:09 p.m. on September 28, 2016 (EDT)
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Lets just keep this civil...Were supposed to treat people the way we want to be treated...I know it's social forum....

8:11 p.m. on September 28, 2016 (EDT)
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Agreed, agreed! Just one more...


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8:19 p.m. on September 28, 2016 (EDT)
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@ joe I love it man

Denis it's all good everyone's enjoying this one

9:36 p.m. on September 28, 2016 (EDT)
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9:37 p.m. on September 28, 2016 (EDT)
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Bob i have a good friend who uses one of these ^^^. He's been through a cat 3 with it and claims it's the only way to go. They're made by an Australian company and were designed with typhoon camping (Southern Hemisphere version of what we do) in mind. Only problem is you gotta drop around 10k for a serious setup. There's an attachment for outrigger pontoons that makes it virtually unsinkable and built in fixtures for the anchor lines under the tents so no one has to go outside messing with anchor lines during the gale 

9:38 p.m. on September 28, 2016 (EDT)
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still think a four season staked out on a solid styrofoam block attached to a danforth is the lightest safest most most economical way to go though. 

10:04 p.m. on September 28, 2016 (EDT)
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And one more thing. Look y'all started the name calling. Just because it's my first post does not make me a rookie. I just do other things with my free time than haunt blogs and pretend like I'm better than other people. I've been called a liar since I first contributed. I'm not, and trying to help answer a simple question has gotten my *character* Assassinated.

Sorry about the elderly jibes fellas but fact is I don't make up stories about camping. It's my life. I live camping every single day. 

Incidentally, I am an anthropology major so please allow me to lay some facts on you. Tidal storm camping is a well known extreme survival tactic that has been utilized in coastal cultures across the globe in one way or another for literally tens of thousands of years. You do know that large population island and coastal communities have been surviving on the beach through large cat 5 storms long before your prefabricated roadside cabin was built . Indeed, nearly a quarter of the worlds population alive today would in fact not exist were their grandparents/ancestors not capable storm/tidal campers/survivors.

In conclusion, the lack of historical camping knowledge at trail space along with seemingly zero knowledge at how to excel in basic coastal extreme survival situations, along with my repeatedly being trolled and bullied and branded a liar is why I refuse to contribute my knowledge any longer 

11:05 p.m. on September 28, 2016 (EDT)
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Hmm, maybe its time to lock this thread...

Ed

 

11:11 p.m. on September 28, 2016 (EDT)
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Over 1/4 the worlds population is coastal, and how did they do it? By surviving. This idea aligns pretty closely with my interests in pursuing survivalism as a hobby and getting closer to nature. Admittedly, jumping into this hobby with a hurricane may not be the "smartest" idea, but i feel like there's no real way to prepare for hurricane camping by renting a cabin next to the river like some here may be inclined to do - either you're in or you're out, and I'm definitely in.

I really didn't mean for this to turn into a pissing contest but since it's already there, I feel like I should add that I have done the Texas Water Safari (twice) so I know my way around fast-moving water, canoes, kayaks, and swimming. Plus I've assisted in Hill Country SAR swift water rescues on the Blanco, Colorado, and Guadalupe. I came here for tips about how to survive mother nature, but now it looks like i need tips on how to survive Trailspace. Keith, I appreciate all your advice. I just wish more people could understand the gist of your vision. 

11:56 p.m. on September 28, 2016 (EDT)
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Keith Springer said:

. . . . but fact is I don't make up stories about camping. It's my life. I live camping every single day. 

Incidentally, I am an anthropology major so please allow me to lay some facts on you.

 Define Camping as in your first quote.  Hopefully it's not car camping or popup RV frivolity.  Or in a van down by the river. 

Please explain "I live camping every single day."  Inquiring minds want to know.  And if you are an anthropology major I assume you attend a university and yet you live camping every single day.  Do you attend classes and sleep under a bush behind the library every night? 

12:28 a.m. on September 29, 2016 (EDT)
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12:34 a.m. on September 29, 2016 (EDT)
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I live in my moms yard. No I do not have electricity or access to plumbing. My mom allows me to keep my surfboards in the garage and I lifeguard at a local pool which allows me to take care of nearly all my needs. Straight up I have been sleeping every single night in a tent for the past seven years straight. Go ahead and ridicule me from the comfort of your foam mattress and big screen tv playing reruns of naked and afraid now. It dosent bother me I'm proud of my mad survival skillz

6:55 a.m. on September 29, 2016 (EDT)
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whomeworry said:

 

Hmm, maybe its time to lock this thread...

Ed

 

 Obvious troll was obvious from the start. Kids today don't even put much effort into it. Back in the day a good troll was something to stand back and appreciate like an impressionist painting, but this was just a sad slapdash effort. Another example of today's instant gratification generation proudly failing to take the time to do things well.

10:27 a.m. on September 29, 2016 (EDT)
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It's easier to dismiss something as "false" or "fake" when it's hard to understand. I'm betting the topic of the moon landing would be met with an equivalent amount of skepticism from this audience. I guess I'll be looking for tips on hurricane camping on Reddit, where the AOL crowd has been thinned out enough that I can collect valuable insight on contemporary camping concepts such as this one.

10:34 a.m. on September 29, 2016 (EDT)
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Bobby you know anyone on Texsar? I know the water safari. Friends have been doing  it for about 4 years straight..I don't know if this is fake...But I really like to find out....

11:58 a.m. on September 29, 2016 (EDT)
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As I noted above, I lived for 10 years in hurricane country, though safely inland (still got some storm damage, though). My friends who lived in Biloxi had their house on Cat Island washed away, leaving only the foundation. The house was built with plenty of rebar in the poured concrete, knowing that storm surges are very strong. I have also spent significant time in storms where the wind was at hurricane level, though there was no water for storm surge (these were 70 kt winds at high altitudes - I am aware that Ed has been through similar storms at high altitude). During our 6 days in one storm, there were several tents lifted away with the occupants in them, at least one lifted out of a depression- so much for your

plan was to camp inside a bowl between the dunes

Here is a link to a hurricane storm surge video

The winds in a hurricane are nothing compared to what happens with the water in a storm surge. There are videos on line of the recent Sandy storm. You should research what happened to the Texas Gulf coast, especially the Galveston incident

The Galveston hurricane was before I was born, but involved some relatives.

Bobby and Keith have made it clear that they have not done the basic research to understand what really happens in a hurricane on a beach. They have also posted statements that are far from the basic reality of high-windspeed storms. Much of what they have posted is so far from reality that all indications (though they both disclaim it) are that they are playing the troll game. Many of their statements would be hilarious, were it not for my own minor encounters with hurricanes and hurricane force winds plus what friends and relatives have gone through during the past 100 years or so.

This also reminds me of another "hurricane camper" who posted on Trailspace about 5-10 years ago. That person posted the same "solutions" and spent a lot of time (he said) going to beaches that were scheduled to be struck by major hurricanes. 

Oh, yeah, the Jody Foster movie - you better look at ia again. The "Twister" vehicle was for tornado chasing, not hurricanes with storm surges. It was designed to prevent the aerodynamic forces of the high-speed winds from lifting the vehicle, with a lot of armoring to protect against the flying debris. The flying debris in hurricanes is the least of your problems - it's the storm surge. 

I have to agree with Ed - Moderators, it is time to close this thread

12:04 p.m. on September 29, 2016 (EDT)
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I think you should work up to a hurricane to learn to deal with the wind i.e. set up your tent on the beach on a windy day, then in a thunderstorm, then in a tropical storm, then in a small hurricane, then in a large hurricane.  I think it would be tough to do a large hurricane for your first outing.  I have set up many tents and thought I would have no trouble setting up on a beach on a windy day, but when I tried it I found it very difficult - you take the tent out of the bag and the bag wants to fly away, etc. 

With regard to the storm surge, I am not sure how to deal with that.  You could watch some of the videos of that tsunami in Thailand a few years ago to help with your planning.  As to how our ancestors dealt with tidal living, their solution was to accept the attrition, Darwin style i.e. 20% of the population might just be gone after the event, and the survivors would just have to carry on.  Sandy had a 5 ft storm surge, but the 1938 hurricane had a 40 ft storm surge so just be prepared for that.  

Tropical storm Matthew might be a good opportunity for testing at the end of next week.  If you take some video, I would love to see it.

1:46 p.m. on September 29, 2016 (EDT)
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1,399 forum posts

Locking this thread until Dave can check a couple of IP addresses. 

Just a reminder, if you think someone is a troll, the best thing to do is ignore him and flag the post for moderators to look into. Trolls are only happy when they are being fed. As soon as you ignore them, they go away.

And if a person is not a troll, but simply unwilling to listen to sound advice, why waste your time trying to convince him otherwise?

"When a wise man has a controversy with a foolish man, The foolish man either rages or laughs, and there is no rest." -Jewish proverb

May 24, 2019
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