Camp Coffee - How Do You Brew?

5:06 p.m. on September 22, 2015 (EDT)
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I am a coffee drinker and that does not change simply because I am going camping. I might even enjoy it even more while camping. For many of you it is the same story. I however am not real picky about my coffee. I just avoid anything that is to acidic. I usually doctor it up with cream and sugar too.
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There is something about waking up in the tent on a cold morning and having that hot cup of Joe to get you going. It helps me mentally and physically and most of the time I am fixing my first cup while still in my sleeping bag.

I have not really experimented a lot with my coffee and would like to get some input from the Trailspace community before I do. I know that some of you are very passionate about your coffee and that it is more like a ritual than a routine. How do you brew? Instant? What kind? Do you use the French press? Which one? What about beans? Grinding and storing them? I have so many questions.
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I have heard that a French press is the way to go and provides the most flavor. I have seen contraptions that have a built in grinder, heater and mug. I have seen set ups that weigh several pounds.

In the past I have simply used instant coffee. Several different brands. Most of the time I drank it black while on the trail. A friend of mine showed me these instant coffee packs that already have the cream and sugar mixed in. They are not bad for what they are and only weigh 20 grams or .7 ounces per packet. For a coffee lover that weight is nothing. He gets them from an Asian Food Market in Indiana. I place an order every so often and he picks them up for me. Not a bad price. 10 bucks for 48 packets. If you are looking for a vary simple coffee fix and are not picky you should try these. See the photo. 3 in 1 coffee mix. Other photos show that I have 2 different kinds by the same company.
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I have a French press for my Jetboil that I am going to try out but need recommendations on the best way to brew.

So, again. How do you brew?

7:13 p.m. on September 22, 2015 (EDT)
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I tried some Starbucks Vya last week which was good, but it has an unbelievable 20 g of sugar.

The tried and true method is pound some beans with a rock in a bandana. Then boil in fresh water and simmer awhile. Before serving add some cold water to settle the grounds. People have made coffee this way for thousands of years. You do not need a bunch of equipment.

9:12 p.m. on September 22, 2015 (EDT)
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I have tried everything out there probably.

How you brew depends on how much extra stuff you are willing to bring along in my opinion.

Excellent coffee can be had with just some coffe beans, a pot, some cold water, and a fire or backpackers stove.

The question is: Do you just want to buy some gadge that makes brewing easy, or are you willing to learn how to brew good coffe in a minimalist fashion?

The coffee press does work well, but what else can it do, and how much does it weigh?

Filters of various kinds are lighter, do work well, but you don't have to use one.

Instant coffee is good if you buy the higher end stuff like Via , but you don't get the actual brewing experience and it gets expensive.

My personal preference is cowboy coffee, but it takes a bit of practise.

Most people think you need some kind of gadget to keep grinds out of your cup of coffe, but you don't if you do it right.

Cowboy coffee done right will cause all the grounds to settle and stick to the bottom of the pot. You then simply pour off the coffee into a cup or mug.

For a good example of how it is done go to YouTube and find the coffee video by Mors Kochanski. Titled: Bush coffee with Mors Kochanski

I will post a link if you are interested.

12:49 a.m. on September 23, 2015 (EDT)
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I am super picky about coffee and Starbucks Via is the only instant coffee I can drink and enjoy what I am drinking. The medium Columbia has 5 calories 0 Fat 0 Carbs 0 Protein. On my scales each package weighs 3 grams...which is considerably lighter than bringing non-instant.

For canoeing and short trips where weight is not a big concern I bring a stove-top espresso maker...it is also the only way I drink coffee at home (ridiculously better than coffee made with a French Press). A Bialetti is the way to go if you don't plan to use it outdoors...but I prefer the cheaper cast-aluminum knock-offs for outdoor use.

https://jet.com/product/product/16430679c22a47b880ecb97918c6ad23?jcmp=pla:ggl:home_garden_a3:kitchen_dining_cookware_bakeware_a3_other:na:na:na:na:na:2&code=PLA15&k_clickid=6f74a4bb-a816-c908-33f3-000027f65ba2&kpid=16430679c22a47b880ecb97918c6ad23&gclid=CKa_l7KsjMgCFZCRHwodURUPww

If you really want to impress that special cappuccino drinker in your life bring along an Aerolatte which runs on two AA batteries and comes with a hard plastic case...mine weighs 3oz in the case without batteries.

http://www.amazon.com/Aerolatte-To-Milk-Frother-Black/dp/B0001RT2C4

7:14 a.m. on September 23, 2015 (EDT)
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Answering this one as I sit with a cup a Joe in the morning...I like coffee strong with nothing added so amount of sugar isn't an issue. I used to carry a small coffee percolator, then a French press, but a s I cut pack weight down over the years I gave up all that. Now I just use Via. The price is high as mentioned earlier, but overall I don't mind as I dehydrate most of my own meals so don't spend money on freeze dried etc.

I whole heartedly agree that coffee is even better in the back country in the morning, all year long but especially when it is frosty outside.

9:21 a.m. on September 23, 2015 (EDT)
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I have heard a lot about the Via. Seems it would be worth trying.

9:25 a.m. on September 23, 2015 (EDT)
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Honestly, I am going to try them all. For the most part I think I will attempt most of these at the house first. When I do hit the trail I wonder what the best way of grinding would be? Other than a rock and bandana.

 

9:46 a.m. on September 23, 2015 (EDT)
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trouthunter said:

I have tried everything out there probably.

How you brew depends on how much extra stuff you are willing to bring along in my opinion.

Excellent coffee can be had with just some coffe beans, a pot, some cold water, and a fire or backpackers stove.

The question is: Do you just want to buy some gadge that makes brewing easy, or are you willing to learn how to brew good coffe in a minimalist fashion?

The coffee press does work well, but what else can it do, and how much does it weigh?

Filters of various kinds are lighter, do work well, but you don't have to use one.

Instant coffee is good if you buy the higher end stuff like Via , but you don't get the actual brewing experience and it gets expensive.

My personal preference is cowboy coffee, but it takes a bit of practise.

Most people think you need some kind of gadget to keep grinds out of your cup of coffe, but you don't if you do it right.

Cowboy coffee done right will cause all the grounds to settle and stick to the bottom of the pot. You then simply pour off the coffee into a cup or mug.

For a good example of how it is done go to YouTube and find the coffee video by Mors Kochanski. Titled: Bush coffee with Mors Kochanski

I will post a link if you are interested.

 Cool guy and a helpful video! Thanks!

12:28 p.m. on September 23, 2015 (EDT)
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I'm not a coffee drinker, so I've got nothing to add personally.

But, we've had numerous coffee drinkers review their various presses and filters and drinks, which you can see here:

https://www.trailspace.com/gear/coffee-presses-and-filters/

https://www.trailspace.com/gear/coffee/

The Starbucks VIA seems to be a popular option:

https://www.trailspace.com/gear/starbucks/via-ready-brew/

1:23 p.m. on September 23, 2015 (EDT)
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Camping with the Boy Scouts is a masters course on camp coffee.  Each adult sneaks from his tent while the little angels sleeps and makes a cup to enjoy in the early morning silence. One uses a jetboil french press, one has a plastic cone that takes paper filters and the rest use a variety of instant.

For straight camping nothing beats the french press.  Good coffee and it is a little easier than the plastic cone.  I tried the Via but got a little sticker shock.  One of the engineers at work gave me a G7 instant coffee which comes with cream and sugar in the mix. I typically like it black when hiking and can't stand sugar but this works and I enjoy it. [a quick look at Amazon list 8 VIA for $10.08 or $1.26 per serving and the G7 at $9.25 for 22 or $0.42 per serving.]

Backpacking I only use the instant as I don't want to have to deal with soggy grounds.

G7
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3:23 p.m. on September 23, 2015 (EDT)
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Chris,

You mentioned waking up in your tent to coffee - hopefully it was brewed outside the tent.  Using a stove inside a tent - especially a liquid fuel stove - is flirting with disaster.  It is like driving drunk; eventually the odds will catch up with you, and then you have lost a tent, its contents, some of your hair, and perhaps acquired a serious burn in the process as well.  Even "experts" run afoul and experience tent fires.  I know, some will say: but what about stormy weather?  Rare is the weather that is so dangerous to venture out into that is justifies Russian Roulette with compressed gases to heat coffee or food.  Buck up! if it is too much to endure, perhaps you should just stay home.  And if the weather truly is dangerous (not likely in the lower forty eight), provision accordingly with cold prep items that don't require a stove.  But I digress...

Coffee :)  :)  :)

I grind beans before the trip, and brew using one of those ultra fine mesh metal screens designed to replace paper filters in the home drip brewers.  My screen is about the size of a #4 cone, and has a flat base just large enough to facilitate the cone remaining upright.  I place this cone with grounds into a pot of boiling water, agitate the grounds, then remove pot from heat.  Let brew four minutes.  The resulting Joe is comparable to a French Press, but the system is both lighter and easier to use.

Ed

3:47 p.m. on September 23, 2015 (EDT)
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Yeah, never use a stove in a tent, unless it is cold, rainy, snowing or you feel like it.

People love the ritual of coffee making and like to bring gadgets. For backpacking it is all quite unnecessary and goes back to simple living.

7:17 p.m. on September 23, 2015 (EDT)
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whomeworry said:

Chris,

You mentioned waking up in your tent to coffee - hopefully it was brewed outside the tent.  Using a stove inside a tent - especially a liquid fuel stove - is flirting with disaster.  It is like driving drunk; eventually the odds will catch up with you, and then you have lost a tent, its contents, some of your hair, and perhaps acquired a serious burn in the process as well.  Even "experts" run afoul and experience tent fires.  I know, some will say: but what about stormy weather?  Rare is the weather that is so dangerous to venture out into that is justifies Russian Roulette with compressed gases to heat coffee or food.  Buck up! if it is too much to endure, perhaps you should just stay home.  And if the weather truly is dangerous (not likely in the lower forty eight), provision accordingly with cold prep items that don't require a stove.  But I digress...

Coffee :)  :)  :)

I grind beans before the trip, and brew using one of those ultra fine mesh metal screens designed to replace paper filters in the home drip brewers.  My screen is about the size of a #4 cone, and has a flat base just large enough to facilitate the cone remaining upright.  I place this cone with grounds into a pot of boiling water, agitate the grounds, then remove pot from heat.  Let brew four minutes.  The resulting Joe is comparable to a French Press, but the system is both lighter and easier to use.

Ed

 Stove is outside the tent! I know better! Thanks for the warning. I was thinking about grinding beans before the trip. Will look into the screens!

10:53 p.m. on September 23, 2015 (EDT)
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I do not drink coffee or tea, but your question makes me think of a cowboy that I once knew who did a bicycle tour with me many years ago. He made his coffee very strong. 

He used a enamelware coffee pot with the percolator removed completely. When he rode with me the second night out he said he would have to replace his coffee pot because "it was full". Full of grounds that is, he would add fresh coffee every time he made it to the pot but didn't empty out the ones from the previous days brew all the way back for 30 days. 

Don't know how he drank it so  rich from everyday adding new grounds without dumping out the old? But he seemed to love his brew!

I rarely drink anything hot in the woods besides buillon of beef or chicken flavoring left over from my Top Ramen. Sometime hot chocolate!

4:39 a.m. on September 24, 2015 (EDT)
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Chris Myers said:

whomeworry said:

...Using a stove inside a tent - especially a liquid fuel stove - is flirting with disaster...

 Stove is outside the tent! I know better! Thanks for the warning. I was thinking about grinding beans before the trip. Will look into the screens!

Did not mean to direct my spiel at you, rather your comment served as another opportunity to put a safety public service announcement out there for those that don't know...

Ed

6:44 a.m. on September 24, 2015 (EDT)
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whomeworry said:

Chris Myers said:

whomeworry said:

...Using a stove inside a tent - especially a liquid fuel stove - is flirting with disaster...

 Stove is outside the tent! I know better! Thanks for the warning. I was thinking about grinding beans before the trip. Will look into the screens!

Did not mean to direct my spiel at you, rather your comment served as another opportunity to put a safety public service announcement out there for those that don't know...

Ed

No worries. Solid information that everyone should know! 

6:58 a.m. on September 24, 2015 (EDT)
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Chris your gonna hate me...Cold coffee unless it's a cold morning or camping..I use Via and Nescafe Dark roasted..In the mornings backpacking I need to get moving..So water bottle with some singles...Yeah I know..But when it's a cold morning I'll fire up my stove..When camping a jetboil or a post on the fire...

8:50 a.m. on September 24, 2015 (EDT)
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Cold? Denis, your previous posts have earned my respect of your knowledge and experience, but I now question your sanity and good judgment...

But seriously, you are way more motivated than me to get on the trail if you can go cold. Even for work when we have to go in the field during 100 plus days in the southern summer, and the experts say to prehydrate and avoid caffeine, I still have to have my large mug of hot coffee.

10:18 a.m. on September 24, 2015 (EDT)
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The colder it is, the important hot drinks and soup become. They can really help morale. I like to bring a small propane stove, or an MSR for cold weather.

When I worked outside a lot we used to carry roasted coffee beans that were covered in a light layer of chocolate. They were great in the afternoon in a shirt pocket when there was no time to stop and build a fire.

10:43 a.m. on September 24, 2015 (EDT)
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+1 to ppine eating coffee beans!

I have been using the non-flavored Starbucks VIA for some time now. ppine mentioned 20g of sugar, however this doesn't refer to their regular instant VIA, like Colombian dark roast, etc.

My other go to is sort of a jump-starter. Like many of you, I don't want to get out of that sleeping bag. Once my boot liners are warmed up in the bag, I make a mad dash to the bear bag/can... Usually staged up top, are COFFEE BALLS.

I coarsely grind roasted coffee beans and add some additional ingredients: peanut butter, coconut oil, dark chocolate, and I'll typically roll them in chopped or crushed nuts. Chomp, chomp, chomp... This rush of sugar and caffeine gets me going, and helps me get warmed up before I even carry the bear bag/can to camp. 

Obviously for those of you that want to monitor your sugar levels, this is not an ideal recipe. This works so great for me that when the weather is mild (not summer or they melt), I don't even make coffee..

12:28 p.m. on September 24, 2015 (EDT)
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Phil It took me a full year getting use to it...But when I do get resupply in towns I have the largest hot coffee I can find...But I started doing it cause it takes me so much time to get out of camp...I am not up right away..I can start walking drinking my coffee and be up in about 30 mins as opposed to an hour later...

3:47 p.m. on September 24, 2015 (EDT)
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I really enjoy a good cup of coffee on a frosty morning. Fortunately, most mornings up here are of the frosty variety. This year we had below freezing temperatures in July and snow from the beginning of September. I find I am never in too much of a rush in the mornings that I cannot ease out of my sleeping bag a bit and spark up the stove for a relaxing brew. I prefer my mornings to unfold slowly and sometimes even indulge in a second cup along with my oatmeal. Depending on where I camp, either in the mountains to the west of us or the tundra around our home, we try to time it for when one of the large migrations of wildlife come through. On a few occasions we have sipped our coffee while being surrounded by caribou slowly meandering through the morning mist. These are magical moments. Who would want to rush through their day when we have all the time in the world to enjoy scenes like these?


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My coffee making preference has evolved from a simple tin can over a fire into which I through a handful of grounds to my current Snow Peak Titanium French Press. It is virtually weightless and I always find I have room in my pack for it. As for a mug, my blue enamel one seen here always accompanies me. I like it for its size; I can rest it on my Whisperlite stove and it never seems to tip over. I can even cook my oatmeal in it.


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Coffee ranges from Death Wish coffee to Nepal Mt. Everest Supreme, although I really like those offered by Raven’s Brew out of Ketchikan, Alaska. I have tasted the 3 in 1 coffees while in S.E. Asia but I prefer coffee strong, black, no sugar.

4:49 p.m. on September 24, 2015 (EDT)
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Love the landscape photo North 1 !

I do like the Snow Peak titanium coffee presses like North 1 shows the nice photo of.

Years ago I used to carry an aluminum 6 cup percolator and stuff it full of supplies so it didn't waste space in my pack. I even learned how to make rice & pasta with it, you can steam bake in one too.

Those are both things I can bring along if space and weight allow, but for my fast & light trips I stick to a small stove, a  ti mug, a ti spork, & a small rag, nothing else.

9:43 p.m. on September 24, 2015 (EDT)
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denis daly said:

Chris your gonna hate me...Cold coffee unless it's a cold morning or camping..I use Via and Nescafe Dark roasted..In the mornings backpacking I need to get moving..So water bottle with some singles...Yeah I know..But when it's a cold morning I'll fire up my stove..When camping a jetboil or a post on the fire...

 haven't tried cold coffee. And I don't knock it till I have tried it. To each his own!  I don't judge!

9:44 p.m. on September 24, 2015 (EDT)
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Sean Van Cleve said:

+1 to ppine eating coffee beans!

I have been using the non-flavored Starbucks VIA for some time now. ppine mentioned 20g of sugar, however this doesn't refer to their regular instant VIA, like Colombian dark roast, etc.

My other go to is sort of a jump-starter. Like many of you, I don't want to get out of that sleeping bag. Once my boot liners are warmed up in the bag, I make a mad dash to the bear bag/can... Usually staged up top, are COFFEE BALLS.

I coarsely grind roasted coffee beans and add some additional ingredients: peanut butter, coconut oil, dark chocolate, and I'll typically roll them in chopped or crushed nuts. Chomp, chomp, chomp... This rush of sugar and caffeine gets me going, and helps me get warmed up before I even carry the bear bag/can to camp. 

Obviously for those of you that want to monitor your sugar levels, this is not an ideal recipe. This works so great for me that when the weather is mild (not summer or they melt), I don't even make coffee..

 Now I have to try making my own coffee balls! Thanks for the info!!

11:17 p.m. on September 24, 2015 (EDT)
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I have tried it cold a couple of times but couldn't do it....more power to you Denis. I wish I could stick it out and get used to it.

One thing I have tried in desert hiking with dry camps and hauling a lot of precious water: wrapping grounds in cheesecloth and sucking on one of the "coffee wads", as we called them. Don't know if we just picked the wrong coffee or didn't grind it right, but that was awful...the withdrawal headache was more pleasant.

7:02 a.m. on September 25, 2015 (EDT)
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Gotta admit North 1 photo put me at the Ahh and ooo..I would be drinking 3 cups and slow down where he is....That would be a once in a lifetime trip...I have the same cup also....:)

9:24 p.m. on October 13, 2015 (EDT)
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 I use the MSR Mug mate with my Snow Peak 450 double wall mug. It brews a cup in about 3 minutes. If you invert the filter basket and tap it with a spoon all the grinds fall out into your trash bag. The filter cleans up easy. It makes a tasty cup of hot coffee Who wants a mess to clean out of the bottom of a french press.   

8:55 a.m. on October 14, 2015 (EDT)
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It seems odd that in a time when people have such Spartan ways when it come to food, that they would bring along filter baskets, presses, and espresso makers for the coffee ritual.

11:20 a.m. on October 14, 2015 (EDT)
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haha... watch the first 16 seconds of my last summer trip clip vid for the pour-over basket I sometimes use:

 

11:46 a.m. on October 14, 2015 (EDT)
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I don't usually carry those things backpacking (I have...but rarely)...but if bringing those things means I am blessed with the company of an amazing/wonderful/beautiful/witty/etc companion...I will gladly cut some miles from my trip and load a pack with some extra weight...a smile and thank you can be a very beautiful thing!

4:52 p.m. on October 16, 2015 (EDT)
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Joseph makes a good point. Sometimes it is best to make the trip cushier, especially if it means that your sweetheart is more likely to come along. The same can be said for newbies, if you really like them.

5:14 p.m. on October 16, 2015 (EDT)
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Either instant ala tea bags or cowboy coffee. Nowadays I  just make it by the cup with instant tea-bag type bags.

For cowboy coffee by the cup, just steep ground beans of your choice in nearly boiling water. then filter it.

For cowboy coffee for large groups (aka Army coffee), get a huge pot of water near boiling and pour the grounds in.  Keep that pot near boiling and steep, steep, steep.  Then SLOWLY AND EASILY ladle in cold water(in a swirl pattern as you keep the ladle just over/off the surface of the coffee.  NO SPLASHING!  Slowly and easily.  The cold water will pull floating grounds to the bottom of the pot.  At this stage it is very important not to move the pot, bang it, or in any way upset it as the grounds will then lift off the bottom.  To get the drink into a cup without disturbing the settled grounds, slowly break the surface tension with a ladle lip and let the drink slowly flow into the ladle.  Then slowly lift the ladle off the surface.  Pour the ladle into a cup.

Cowboy coffee is a hassle.  I also won't take another gadget in the woods just for coffee so I stick with instant tea-bag type bags.  I've thought of using a steel tea ball with grounds from beans but have just never gotten around to trying it.   All that said, even in a home kitchen my son often makes cowboy coffee the traditional way, and it is GOOD.

10:41 a.m. on October 17, 2015 (EDT)
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I am with Bill. This word cowboy gets tossed around a lot and out of context. I will be making coffee in a large pot on a fire at the end of the month for 40 people. It is an enamel pot with nothing in it. Cold water at the end settles the grounds. I made coffee that way in the house for 25 years with no complaints.

11:52 p.m. on October 17, 2015 (EDT)
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I do "cowboy coffee", but slightly differently from Bill and ppine.  I start with a pot of boiling water, then add my grounds (usually about Tbsp for 2 people).  I let these steep for about 2-3 minutes, then drop a (clean) pebble into the pot.  You'll know the coffee is ready if the broken surface tension caused by the pebble leads the grounds to drop to the bottom of the pot.  If any grounds remain floating on the surface, keep waiting and repeat.

Once all of the grounds have dropped to the bottom, you can pour (Slowly!) into cups without much / any grounds.

11:46 a.m. on October 18, 2015 (EDT)
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If we want to get western about making coffee, add some fresh egg shells, and several handfuls of coffee. Heat to boiling and simmer for awhile. Drop in a horseshoe. If it still floats add more coffee.

That is how you get people that are chronically sleep deprived going at 0400 to go on a cow hunt. Many old timers will add coffee for a few days before emptying the grounds. It does not hurt a thing.

5:49 p.m. on November 16, 2015 (EST)
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I drink organo gold it's micro ground no acidic and it comes in single serve packs. So you just have to boil water add the coffee and stir its that simple its instant in application only. You can get it at jiminacoffee.myorganogold.com

9:40 p.m. on November 17, 2015 (EST)
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Just got back from a trip where I used up my stock of Via over the first three days and supplemented with Folgers instant packs, which look like Via knockoffs but at a much lower price. I didn't notice the difference while on the trail, but Via definitely tastes better at home...

3:46 a.m. on November 18, 2015 (EST)
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It is a great thread! I adore good coffee too.

10:49 a.m. on November 18, 2015 (EST)
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I use an Aerobie Aeropress and it is by far my favorite coffee brewing method in the woods or at home. It's really easy to use, there is minimal cleanup, and it brews an incredible smooth cup of coffee. (for all the BOLD coffee drinkers, you can even brew a really bold, but smooth cup). They're pretty small, lightweight and inexpensive. Unless you're trying to REALLY pack light and minimal, I wouldn't settle for instant coffee and would pick up one of these!
Here's my review on it. (I'm may update it soon to add a little more info) 
https://www.trailspace.com/gear/aerobie/aeropress/#review30734

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11:20 a.m. on November 18, 2015 (EST)
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And for your amusement, here's a little time-lapse that I made a while back of me using a Jetboil and Aeropress to make some coffee. It may give you a better idea of how it works. 

11:02 a.m. on November 19, 2015 (EST)
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People that cowboy for a living, never use a filter. It is the easiest to make coffee in the world.

I was on a commercial pack trip once in the Sierras. Cookie forgot coffee somehow. The first day was about 15 miles in. The second morning people sat stunned, staring into the fire. One of the young guys, saddled up after breakfast and rode the 30 miles round trip to get some. Harmony was restored. A week later on the way to the pack station there were signs in the woods, "Forget something?".

1:36 p.m. on November 20, 2015 (EST)
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This post reminds me of some lines from Calvin Rutstrum's Paradise Below Zero, which I still find relevant today:

In the wilderness, the coffeepot gets a place on the wood-burning stove with almost ritualistic ceremony. A small amount of cold water is first mixed with the coffee grounds. Before closing the lid a few casual inhalations from the pot opening catch the fragrance.

10:12 a.m. on November 21, 2015 (EST)
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Thanks for the reference to Rutstrum. The book you mentioned helped give me the confidence to start doing winter trips back in the 1970s.  Being Canadian he often talked about making tea, and carrying a thermos during the day. The famous "mug ups" are still charming and a good idea.

11:29 a.m. on November 21, 2015 (EST)
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I made some cowboy coffee. I plugged in my electric coffee maker, made coffee and drank it. Then went out and gathered cattle out of the mountains all day in blowing slush/rain. Got home that evening and made more coffee in my electric coffee maker and drank that to warm up. Cowboy coffee.

Oh come on, that was a little funny. Wasn't it? I couldn't help myself. 

12:49 p.m. on November 21, 2015 (EST)
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Well, it was funny to me because that was Thursday. The same morning that I read this thread for the first time. 

9:38 p.m. on November 21, 2015 (EST)
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How have you been Dale? It is always good to hear from anyone that cowboys for a living. Coffee is important on most outfits. How was fall shipping?

 

9:01 a.m. on November 22, 2015 (EST)
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So far so good. A couple more days gathering out of the hills and the last truck is scheduled to be loaded out on Tuesday. After that I am officially in winter mode and it's time for backpacking. Looking forward to that. 

9:01 a.m. on November 22, 2015 (EST)
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So far so good. A couple more days gathering out of the hills and the last truck is scheduled to be loaded out on Tuesday. After that I am officially in winter mode and it's time for backpacking. Looking forward to that. 

11:16 a.m. on November 22, 2015 (EST)
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cold coffee is for gunsels.

8:03 p.m. on November 22, 2015 (EST)
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Yes.

That's funny.

6:08 a.m. on November 23, 2015 (EST)
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Maybe a combination of medical technology and a platypus bag in the backpack could give us a new coffee delivery method..

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSzbzJaOi02GHpumempIoz

Obviously too much coffee already this morning...

1:30 p.m. on December 18, 2015 (EST)
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+1 on the Starbucks Via...  They are super light and a no-brainer to prepare.  Just boil your water and dump 'em in.....

6:53 p.m. on December 24, 2015 (EST)
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MSR makes a screen that fits in your cup. just put ground coffee in and pour hot water and you have good coffee. Just like home. It is small enough so it fits inside my tea pot or cook pot. REI has them.

12:32 a.m. on December 30, 2015 (EST)
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FlipNC said:

Maybe a combination of medical technology and a platypus bag in the backpack could give us a new coffee delivery method..

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSzbzJaOi02GHpumempIoz

Obviously too much coffee already this morning...

 Yes Yes!

Now if I can just talk my serologist into backpacking!


coffee.jpg

9:32 a.m. on January 11, 2016 (EST)
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I personally use instant coffee exclusively since i'm not very picky and i want it to be as easy as possible. I tried the Starbucks Via once and it was really good, but i don't always choose this one since it's expensive.

1:11 p.m. on February 24, 2016 (EST)
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Ben Rivers said:

I use an Aerobie Aeropress and it is by far my favorite coffee brewing method in the woods or at home. It's really easy to use, there is minimal cleanup, and it brews an incredible smooth cup of coffee. 

They're pretty small, lightweight and inexpensive. Unless you're trying to REALLY pack light and minimal,

 

I agree with this review. 

I've been carrying Starbucks Via Instant for many years to save weight.  But recently, I bought the Aerobie AeroPress kit recently for about $29. 

The components that I carry backpacking weigh about 10 oz, so it's not a bad trade-off on trips I have the wifey with me. Easy to use, easy to clean.

Good suggestion!

10:22 a.m. on February 25, 2016 (EST)
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I am headed to the desert on Monday. We are not bringing a stove. We will be outside Death Valley NP so the plan is a small warming fire in the morning to heat some water for instant Mexican coffee. 

8:58 p.m. on February 26, 2016 (EST)
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I love my coffie when camping. Nothing like a hot drink that puts a hop in your step and your butt over a cat hole. But what a lot of campers don't know is. Coffee creamer will cause what is known to lawyers and law officials as a false positive. On a field test kits. My son took my bag of coffee creamer I had left over to school as a joke. We went to panther town valley. The school cop or SRO used a field test kit on it. And charged him at 12 with fellony possession of heroin.  Later they changed the charge to felony possession of meth.I hired a lawyer.  1,500.00 bucks and 6 months wait on the state's crime lab to say it's not narcotic. The milk and milk byproducts causes this. So please for your own sake.  Don't put coffie creamer in a zip lock bag. Boy's will do dumb stuff, I know I'm an assistant scoutmaster. Yes my son is still alive, I came close to removing his hine end for that.

8:20 a.m. on February 27, 2016 (EST)
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I think it says a lot about the power, and addictiveness?, of coffee when this is one of the longer and longest running threads on the site. Sitting out back having my second cup as I write this...

10:59 a.m. on February 27, 2016 (EST)
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Even a dumb cop should be able to taste the white powder in a plastic bag if a kid says it is coffee creamer.

Your post makes no sense.

11:30 a.m. on February 27, 2016 (EST)
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Ummm, you'd have to be pretty dumb to taste an unknown substance like that ppine. You've probably been watching too much TV, but in the real world putting stuff in your mouth like that can lead to injury, death and/or tripping balls.

1:19 p.m. on February 27, 2016 (EST)
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I was on social Media yesterday and the conversation went to Coffee..I was surprised about what people were drinking and how..The Aerio Press that Ben did the review on was talked about...I was surprised on how many had it...

3:24 p.m. on February 27, 2016 (EST)
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I 'll take your word for it, but I have tasted plenty of drugs like cocaine without ill effect. A small amount of heroin will do you no harm.

7:26 p.m. on February 27, 2016 (EST)
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Ppine, My post is true. Me and my family went threw hell. We got investigatied by department of social services, department of public safety because of his age. We have a store in Asheville nc called Aldi. If you don't belave me. Go to Aldi and get their brand Beaumont coffee creamer. Put it in a zip lock bag. Then let a cop find it, or give it to the cop. After they use one of the field test kits on it. Please let me know how it goes for you. Yes a quick taste would have told them. I totally agree with you. My guess is that the dumbest of cops are directing traffic. And the cops in school are so board they over react along with the principle. Who with the cops did a criminal investigation on my son with out me or my wife present.  North Carolina has a law that lets them get away with it. I mean no disrespect to you are anyone else. I just thought I would warn everyone about this unjust travesty.  

10:18 a.m. on February 28, 2016 (EST)
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Oogway, I believe your story, and I am sorry for what you had to go through. My comment was directed to LoneStranger.  If a kid has a white powder in a bag and says it is coffee creamer, the first field test would be to taste it.

10:42 a.m. on February 28, 2016 (EST)
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Your comment that came before mine was directed at me? Spooky!

If you want to find out the difference between coffee creamer and sodium hydroxide by tasting it you are welcome to it, but expecting a police officer to do so is a bit much.

11:09 a.m. on February 28, 2016 (EST)
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Police officers are taught at police acedemy's to use a field kick...Hate to burst the bubble on that one...

10:56 a.m. on February 29, 2016 (EST)
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what kid carries lye around in a plastic bag telling people it is coffee creamer?

11:09 a.m. on February 29, 2016 (EST)
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The real question here is why would anyone use creamer in their coffee?

4:54 p.m. on February 29, 2016 (EST)
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Good point, Ben!

I have two requirements on coffee in the outdoors - strong and hot. ALL coffee tastes better in the outdoors so I feel like while I enjoy "quality" in my daily life, I can take cheaper coffee while camping. Lately I've switched to instant because I hate packing out the grounds. Though my dad loves the Folger's tea-bag style coffee, I feel like it takes way too long and I enjoy sucking the excess moisture out of the tea bag more than the coffee it produces. 

 Do any of you who mentioned loose grounds have any good solutions for packing out spent grounds (aside from natural compost - let's assume Wilderness area rules)?

5:24 p.m. on February 29, 2016 (EST)
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When I carry ground coffee I bring individual portions packed in small zip bags. The grounds get put back into the zip after use, then I squeeze the bag gently to remove excess moisture. I generally only use fresh ground when I have time to let it drain before packing it so there usually isn't much, but I like to get rid of what I can easily. Then the sealed small zip goes into my larger zip garbage bag.

Perhaps its TMI, but I put the morning's TP in the used coffee zip when I'm winter camping or am otherwise disposed to packing it out. The coffee grounds make the garbage bag smell better on longer trips I think so are worth their weight to carry even if you aren't into LNT.

3:52 p.m. on March 1, 2016 (EST)
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I actually have done it several ways. Depends on the conditions of the trip.

Back before I had my Jetboil Coffee Press I just used Foldgers coffee bags.
Folgers.jpg

I brewed 2-3 because they are kind of weak. Works just like tea bags.

Foil wrapper & soggy bags are your trash. Coffee tastes ok.

Now whenever I'm backpacking around a river where I know for a fact I'll have plenty of water to wash out my Jetboil I'll use the coffee press.


press.jpg

It's the best coffee you'll ever have if you bring your favorite fresh grounds.

There was one draw back when we were poured on one morning and I didn't think before brewing coffee before boiling breakfast in the vestibule.

Oops. We enjoyed a romantic morning cup of coffee in the rain under our tent but now I couldn't (didn't want to) go wash out the grounds in the flooding (now muddy) river.

Luckily we had a couple of apple pie Larabars to suffice.

When I'm in a desert environment where i have to pack in all of my water I'm not about to use the Jetboil coffepress because every drop of water is weight & very precious to me.

I'll use Starbucks VIA instant coffees now over the old Folgers bags.
Starbucks.jpg

They come in different brews & flavors and taste great.
Pack super small, not too much trash & are instant. I don't even have to steep my bag.

I'm also considering using the coffee filter/dental floss bag method but haven't tried it yet. Just sounds like the perfect solution for great taste and fresh ground coffee. But again you are left with wet soggy bags.

June 20, 2019
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