MSR Rapidfire capacity?

11:47 a.m. on June 7, 2017 (EDT)
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Several years ago, I did some calculations and realised that I actually got more cook time out of a gas canister stove than I do out of an alcohol stove for the same amount of weight in stove and fuel, so given the convenience and control of a canister stove, I have made the move and never looked back.

IMO, the MSR Rapidfire is one of the best all-around stoves ever made. Its biggest drawback, of course is the weight, so unless I am car camping, I use an MSR PocketRocket. I lent my PocketRocket to my brother, and it never came back, so for the past couple of years, I've been using my Rapidfire exclusively, but I just bought a new PocketRocket on 25% sale, since they have been discontinued in favour of the new PocketRocket 2.

MSR no longer stocks maintenance kits for the Rapidfire, but the only issue I've ever had is that the old o-ring needs a little help from a swipe of silicone grease now and then, to ensure a tight seal. If you need a tightly controlled, wide spread flame for gentle simmering, you can't beat the MSR Rapidfire, unless you do it with the new Whisperlite Universal (which is not as pretty as the Rapidfire!).

While reading the manual for the PocketRocket (something I never do), I noticed they had specifications for the diameter, weight, and height of the pot/pan. That is, 8" diameter pan max, weight 8 lbs. max, height 5" max. I was wondering if anyone has a manual for the old Rapidfire and could tell me whether or not it gives specs for the Rapidfire? Alternately, since the Rapidfire is essentially a Whisperlite that burns canned gas, specs for a Whisperlite should be good enough.

Of course, these stoves are practically bombproof, so I can't imagine ever going over their weight limit for the kind of cooking I do, but it would be nice and interesting to know.



10:11 a.m. on July 25, 2017 (EDT)
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hello ,, i have read your topic and i liked it very useful and interesting post .. thanks for the post that u did

5:52 p.m. on July 25, 2017 (EDT)
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My very best bet on something like this is to call MSR directly and see if they not only have that information but can either send you a copy of the instructions by snail mail and or send you a PDF via email.

6:06 p.m. on July 25, 2017 (EDT)
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As far as parts go what I've found is that one can often by either parts or stoves for older discontinued models at very, very cheap prices on Ebay. Here is one for $19.95+$5.95 shipping that has never been used and lit only one time. A brand new stove for all intense and purposes. http://www.ebay.com/itm/MSR-Rapid-Fire-Isobutane-Stove-Backpack-Hiking-Stove-/112492811577?hash=item1a31181539:g:hocAAOSwHb9ZdNDa

6:08 p.m. on July 25, 2017 (EDT)
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As far as parts go what I've found is that one can often by either parts or stoves for older discontinued models at very, very cheap prices on Ebay. Here is one for $19.95+$5.95 shipping that has never been used and lit only one time. A brand new stove for all intense and purposes. http://www.ebay.com/itm/MSR-Rapid-Fire-Isobutane-Stove-Backpack-Hiking-Stove-/112492811577?hash=item1a31181539:g:hocAAOSwHb9ZdNDa

6:51 p.m. on July 25, 2017 (EDT)
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Oh, and after I went back and looked at it, it also has the instructions. Two birds, one stone. :)

10:01 a.m. on July 27, 2017 (EDT)
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Just signed up to this forum. That might be useful for me, good post!

12:41 p.m. on July 27, 2017 (EDT)
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Unless you are OCD about specs and all, no need to worry about pot sizes and weight limits, these are published per the legal department folks.  

Typical backpacking cooking pots and pans will safely work with all backpacking stoves, when stoves are used in a conventional manner.  The height and width pot specs address stability.  Pots that are too tall or too wide are more apt to tip, especially on the mini stoves that have tiny pot stands.  And if you stick to conventional pots, you'll need not worry about exceeding weight limits. 

What applications warrant caution? 

  • Using wind screens with over-canister burners.  If you choose to use a windscreen with such stoves, you need to include a foil shield as part of the windscreen that sets between the burner and the canister.  You also need to provide a air gap at the bottom of the wind screen to let cool air circulate around the canister.  Failure to follow these two advisories may result in overheating the canister, causing an explosion.
  • Mountaineers sometimes melt snow using two stoves under a large pot.  This can also lead to a fiery accident.  There are no authorized instructions how to do this safely; every time I've seen it done the cook basically micromanaged the operation, monitoring conditions under the pot to avoid overheating.  Sketchy!

Ed

 

8:48 p.m. on July 28, 2017 (EDT)
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I was just curious as to MSR's specifications, I don't need cooking in the backcountry explained to me. :rolleyes: I've been cooking on backpacking stoves for nearly 40 years.

5:26 p.m. on August 1, 2017 (EDT)
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Gemma Seymour said:

I was just curious as to MSR's specifications, I don't need cooking in the backcountry explained to me. :rolleyes: I've been cooking on backpacking stoves for nearly 40 years.

I have followed your posts since you have joined us, and are aware you have been around.  Sorry if you thought I was manspeaking you, that was not my intention - do consider these threads are where others may also learn, and I was expounding on the topic to that audience.

Ed

1:41 p.m. on August 7, 2017 (EDT)
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Quite useful points, Ed. Thank you. 

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