Bars...

11:06 a.m. on January 26, 2018 (EST)
pillowthread
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Some of the best trail bars I've ever eaten, and indeed some of the best food I've ever had, is the stuff packed full of seeds and nuts.

I'm eating a "Health Warrior" coconut-chia bar right now, in fact. This thing is packed full of the good stuff, with 110 calories in the .88oz bar. They're killer with a muddy cup of coffee.

The first ingredient is chia seeds. Little bitty things. I got to thinking about how much of a seed's nutrients are available to our digestive system when the seed's shell isn't cracked during digestion.

That is, I bet I swallow about half those little seeds whole. I wonder if a bar with a high seed content does not have as much bio-available nutrition as one based on something like grains and syrups.

Do we have any nutritionists in the community? Or food scientists? I'd love to hear everyone's thoughts, at any rate.

11:33 a.m. on January 26, 2018 (EST)
LoneStranger
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Let me see if I can my wife to chime in on this subject later. She is like an apothecary when making her morning oatmeal on trail, adding in various seeds and powders and usually turning the whole thing green in color. I'm guessing she might know a thing or two about how the chia and other seeds work.

12:12 p.m. on January 26, 2018 (EST)
FlipNC
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Well my thoughts were just disappointment when I clicked on a thread named "Bars".  Hoping to find good trail drink mixes, the best Scotch for different climates and seasons on the trail, or at least closest dive to a trailhead!

12:16 p.m. on January 26, 2018 (EST)
Patman
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Well I can't comment on the science but I have a co-worker that is a complete health food nut and she makes her own trail bars and is often kind enough to share with me. They are awesome but she puts a lot of time into them; more so than I'm willing to do. 

I've hinted around that I would buy them from her but she always responds with more information on how I can make my own. :) I can also take the hint. 

5:06 p.m. on January 26, 2018 (EST)
FrauStranger
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I do include chia in my "oatmeal apothecary kit" for their nutritional properties. Both my daughter and I like them and are willing to deal with seeds in our teeth. :)  I also like that chia seeds absorb water and expand giving a nice feeling of fullness. Any time I include chia in breakfast or a snack, I am sure to drink extra water so water is available later on in the digestive process. 

If you're really interested in the nutritional science of chia seeds, this article in the Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology may be a good place to start .  There was also 2016 review of the nutrition of chia seeds published in 2016.  LoneStranger will post the links.

5:07 p.m. on January 26, 2018 (EST)
whomeworry
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Phil: 

I found most trail bars will break your teeth if you chew on them.  Same goes for the stools.  The booths have a softer tooth, but who wants to chew on a mouthful of vinyl and foam?

Ed

5:08 p.m. on January 26, 2018 (EST)
LoneStranger
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FrauStranger said:

I do include chia in my "oatmeal apothecary kit" for their nutritional properties. Both my daughter and I like them and are willing to deal with seeds in our teeth. :)  I also like that chia seeds absorb water and expand giving a nice feeling of fullness. Any time I include chia in breakfast or a snack, I am sure to drink extra water so water is available later on in the digestive process. 

If you're really interested in the nutritional science of chia seeds, this article in the Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology may be a good place to start .  There was also 2016 review of the nutrition of chia seeds published in 2016.  LoneStranger will post the links.

 (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3518271)
(https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4926888/).

10:37 a.m. on January 27, 2018 (EST)
ppine
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Many people rely heavily on bars when hiking.  They are handy and are a glucose delivery system.  Through hikers especially are famous for eating lots of them.  They are full of sugar and hard on the teeth.  Homemade bars are by far the best.  Dried fruit and nuts are superior in every way for trail food. 

12:09 p.m. on January 29, 2018 (EST)
Lori Pontious
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I like homemade Kind bars. Though I don't bother to make bars, just clusters, about bite-sized.

July 9, 2020
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