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Do you like coffee on the trail?

Boy have i found the perfect thing last night!

I'm a bit of a coffee snob so i typically grind all my beans at home and then take my JetBoil stove and the JetBoil french press kit for on the trail. Anyways, anyone that's used this setup knows its a bit of a mess to clean up on the trail, especially if water is scarce. So last night while at WalMart stocking up on Ramen and Instant potatoes for this weekends trip, i cruised through the coffee aisle to see what was out there for GOOD coffee but in the tea bag type setup.

That's when i came across these guys: https://reborncoffee.com/
They were $1ea and that store only had the single origin guataemala flavor. I just tried one this morning and it's fricken awesome and the most genius thing i've used in a long time. Plus, it's 100% recyclable!! I'm now on the hunt to find more flavors, hopefully local and for the same $1 price as Reborn charges around $2ea on their website.

Let me know if anyone else has used these and if you love them as much i do!

Glad you like the new coffee Willie.  You are a coffee snob but live on Ramen noodles and instant potatoes?  That makes no sense to me. 

That looks interesting...hope the price stays there for me to try...I am back to Via for 50c per coffee at the most so that discount price would double my coffee budget that I already think is extravagant (yeah I'm cheap).  I like coffee but not enough to carry the grinder.  I have tried the reusable drip coffee thing but it cools down too much while filtering through for me especially in winter.

PPINE...Yeah, i lead a complicated life!

Much more economical to splurge on coffee than it is spending a few bucks on ramens and instant potatoes compared to splurging on something like mountain house meal.

While i love the Reborn stuff i found last night, i also ordered an identical product made by Kuju that's sold on Amazon.  Ordered some of that to try as well.

I also found a place to order the filter portion only, and then you can use your own coffee.  Might try that as well.

I assume you have tried the re-usable GSI Drip Filter?  I have one and used it a bit but as mentioned above found it took too long to filter and cooled down my coffee before it got to the insulated mug in cold weather.  Otherwise worked pretty well.

https://www.trailspace.com/gear/gsi-outdoors/ultralight-java-drip/

FlipNC said:

I assume you have tried the re-usable GSI Drip Filter?  I have one and used it a bit but as mentioned above found it took too long to filter and cooled down my coffee before it got to the insulated mug in cold weather.  Otherwise worked pretty well.

https://www.trailspace.com/gear/gsi-outdoors/ultralight-java-drip/

 A pour over basket like that is great for camping, but I'm back to using instant when covering distance. The weight difference is big and compounded by carrying out the wet grounds. Been rocking the Mount Hagen single serve sticks much of the time and find it works well enough. Price isn't too bad when you buy carefully in bulk online.

That GSI pour over got put to use last week when we awoke to a 5am power outage though! Big advantage of being prepared to live in the woods is being able to have coffee and meals without power :)

we have used Finum Brewing Baskets for years, super light, store in the cup and makes a coffee like French press coffee where the grounds are suspended in the water for the length of the brew. 

But it we are on an organic tea kick now with loose leaf tea in a stainless tea ball. 

FlipNC said:

I assume you have tried the re-usable GSI Drip Filter?  I have one and used it a bit but as mentioned above found it took too long to filter and cooled down my coffee before it got to the insulated mug in cold weather.  Otherwise worked pretty well.

https://www.trailspace.com/gear/gsi-outdoors/ultralight-java-drip/

 Haven't seen or used it.  Seems like it would be the same hassle for cleaning.  The disposable ones i found i can drop into a zip lock when i'm done and pack it out. Bam...done!

LoneStranger said:

FlipNC said:

I assume you have tried the re-usable GSI Drip Filter?  I have one and used it a bit but as mentioned above found it took too long to filter and cooled down my coffee before it got to the insulated mug in cold weather.  Otherwise worked pretty well.

https://www.trailspace.com/gear/gsi-outdoors/ultralight-java-drip/

 A pour over basket like that is great for camping, but I'm back to using instant when covering distance. The weight difference is big and compounded by carrying out the wet grounds. Been rocking the Mount Hagen single serve sticks much of the time and find it works well enough. Price isn't too bad when you buy carefully in bulk online.

That GSI pour over got put to use last week when we awoke to a 5am power outage though! Big advantage of being prepared to live in the woods is being able to have coffee and meals without power :)

 Why not dump the wet grounds (not the filter part) out in the woods?

https://www.lnt.org

That is also why I appreciate the vertical tear opening on the Mount Hagen sticks. Most coffee sticks tear horizontally leaving a tiny bit of wrapper that folks tend to lose track of. The vertical tear lets you get a big opening without separating the package into two pieces.

Those Via nubs are annoying but I just slip it into the main sleeve once it's open and the coffee is in my mug. I would love a good alternative and have looked at Mount Hagan, but got scared by several comments and description of it being light or weaker in flavor. My one criteria is strong for coffee...LS what do you think of it compared to something like Via? A couple of other instant coffees I have tried have cost double the price as I was using two packs per mug. 

I have always used two sticks, no matter the brand or flavor. I want one strong cup while breaking camp. Previously I've used two different brands at a time. Blending seemed to take the edge off their bad points. The MH I double up and while not great, it gets the job done. We're not talking a cup of joy here. Just industrial caffeine infusion.

For good coffee I will carry small, 10g bags of stuff I ground at home and do the pour over thing. I can get two or three pours out of that which is nice when camping and I have the time. Some joy in those cups heh. Just not worth the weight for distance hiking though.

Keep an eye out for roasted beans with a chocolate coating to carry during the day.  We used them for long days in the field.  I wish a I could chew coca leaves like in S America. 

Target carries a fabulous concoction under their store brand that we call Chocolate Explosion. Choco covered almonds, praline almonds, choco coffee beans, choco chips, hazlenuts and mocha flavored pecans. Lots of fat and carbs to give the caffeine something to burn.

I carry a bag as emergency fuel, but it makes a great stoveless breakfast, usually on the last day when I want to get moving fast. We're headed up to climb the Greatest Mountain next week and have prepared two doses laces with granola for summit day breakfast so we can be off at first light.

I wonder if this is the 100th coffee thread on Trailspace yet?  We seem to have a conversation at least once a year about it - shows how important it is to us addicts...

By the way, the LNT approach is a reason I went away from drip coffee, besides the cooling down as well.  I often camp in pristine areas well off trail where I want to leave as little footprint as I can.  Pack it in - Pack it out.  Wet coffee grounds are not something I prefer to carry.

LoneStranger said:

"..We're headed up to climb the Greatest Mountain next week..."

Greatest Mountain - is that its name, or a informal reference to a favorite, in which case what mountain is it?

Ed

There is only one "Great One"  

Denali, Alaska.

From the googles:

Named Katahdin by the Penobscot Native Americans, which means "The Greatest Mountain", it is located within Northeast Piscataquis, Piscataquis County, and is the centerpiece of Baxter State Park.

You'll have to take it up with the Penobscot if you want to argue, but remember Pamola is on their side

Gotta respect someone who knows the lore of his mountains.


Mount-Katahdin.jpg

Above: Mount Katahdin as as viewed from Twin Pines Camp.
Below: Ppine's Great One, an aerial view of Denali (Athabaskan for high or tall).

Denali.jpg

As for "Great Ones", using Ppine's coinage, I have heard K2, known locally as Chhogori (Balti for big mountain), gets the nod for that accolade, with its symmetry and savagery. 

K-2.jpgAbove:  K2 on a good day, as viewed from Baltoro Glacier.

My "Great One" is in Peru, named Nevado Verónica (Snowy Veronica).  The Quechua know it as Willka Wiqi (holy tear), located along the railway leading to Machu Pichu, between Olantaytambo and Agua Caliente, .  


Nevado-Veronica03.jpg
Above: The majestic symmetry of Nevado Verónica just beckons to be climbed, here as seen from a hill above the ruins of Muray.
Below: Nevado Verónica as viewed from the jungle side, along the Urubamba River.  The photo doesn't convey how close you are to this very tall mountain.  You must crane you neck around 45⁰ to obtain this view.  VERY STEEP!

Nevado-Veronica02.jpg
You may catch a glimpse of Nevado Verónica between breaks in the clouds and jungle canopy while on the train to Machu Pichu.  It will be the first snowed capped mountain you pass on the right side of the train.  We climbed it from the jungle side, starting from a village whistle stop the trains make.  Most high altitude mountain climbs are toughest near the top.  But since few people bother climbing Nevado Verónica from the jungle side, the real battle for us was getting above the jungle flora.  Should anyone consider this adventure, I highly recommend doing it from the other side, where you won't have to deal with a thick jungle; and can hire locals to teamster your gear half way up the mountain.  Live and learn... 

Ed

Good work Ed. 

Yes I do enjoy cups of coffee and hot tea along the trial...But I had to look back at what BIg REd said about Mount Hagen organics he found on amazon that was instant he said it was as good ad Via...I need to order some and try it...

That is also why I appreciate the vertical tear opening on the Mount Hagen sticks. Most coffee sticks tear horizontally leaving a tiny bit of wrapper that folks tend to lose track of. The vertical tear lets you get a big opening without separating the package into two pieces.

I cannot say whether I like coffee on the trail? I do not drink it much, but know coffee grounds  make great fertilzer and compost.

Coffee (and tea) drinking are great  morning rituals.   It is quiet time, allows for some contemplation, and gets the day going.  I only drink coffee at other times when things need to get done.  It affects my sleep otherwise.  There are now some health benefits associated with coffee drinking in moderate amounts. 

I'm here for the new instant coffee recommendations. I would never backpack in grounds and a coffee maker, but for car camping I'm basically bringing out my at-home set-up. 

I normally carry a Swiss Volcano stove and in with it I carry one 16oz water, matches, fuel tabs, tea bags and Folger coffee bags [just like tea bags]. Doesn't get simpler, handier or lighter than that.

 I’m a simple man and buy Folgers instant coffee. 

I'm always game for a coffee thread. I hear y'all about the problem with grounds and the problem with the GSI UltraLite Java Drip. But...I refuse to compromise on coffee if I don't have to. I mean, I've carted a Bialetti out into the wilderness before. I won't say that I won't drink instant: sometimes time is of the essence, but in general, I go to the woods to "smooth it," as Nessmuk would say--"we get it rough enough at home." That means savoring my favorite beverage in my favorite surroundings. I use the GSI, but I skip the filter. This allows more of the micro grounds into my coffee, enriching the flavor and its complexity. When I first tried this, I used some over-roasted stuff from some Seattle-based chain. This cooked stuff barely absorbed the water, letting it run through the filter too quickly to make something palatable. Then I switched to fresh Costa Rican coffee. The medium grounds of fresh coffee absorb and hold onto the hot water, slowing the filtration, enriching the brew. Until I made my own Costa Rican "chorreador," I often used my GSI in this fashion for my first cup of coffee in the morning at home...while Mr. Coffee took care of more prosaic caffeine needs. Different brewing methods will bring out the different nuances in the same coffee. I've developed a taste for the GSI pour-over method sans filter. The grounds, incidentally, dry more quickly without the filter--if I have a base camp, I can usually pack out dried grounds. Even wet, though, there is a weight savings by skipping a sodden filter. The resulting coffee won't be to everyone's taste--it doesn't have that fancy clarity of filtered coffee in a white ceramic mug--but it's plenty tasty for me!

Bentbrook said:

"..I can usually pack out dried grounds. Even wet, though, there is a weight savings by skipping a sodden filter..."

Don't bother.  After being disinfected by scalding water, the grounds are little more than a handful of duff the environment will easily absorb.  I mix mine with the litter under a shrub or tree.

Ed

whomeworry said:

Don't bother.  After being disinfected by scalding water, the grounds are little more than a handful of duff the environment will easily absorb.  I mix mine with the litter under a shrub or tree.

Ed

I've thought about that, Ed. That is likely especially true in the moist eastern woodlands where I do most of my backpacking. The main reason I carry them out is because my own pups have shown much interest in coffee grounds that I've added to garden for agricultural purposes (they will dig and nose around in the garden beds), and I know unwashed used grounds can alter the pH of soil. So I figure packing them out is just less disruptive to critters/soil ecology. I understand, though, that washed used grounds have a near neutral pH and can actually attract earthworms, too, so who knows... 

does a cat have climbing gear?

Interesting things about earthworms, I've read multiple times, where they aren't native to North America and are not beneficial to woodlands.

Plants and worms do like coffee tho.

ppine said:

does a cat have climbing gear?

 Cat D-8s make their own path ;)

Skip this if you have heard it before. 

Once I went on a commercial pack trip in the Sierras out of Mammoth. 

We went in around 15 miles the first day, and the next morning, everyone is staring at the morning cook fire looking dazed and confused.   Cookie forgot coffee.  It was an emergency.   The youngest guy on the crew saddled up and rode 30 miles round trip to get coffee. Harmony was restored. 

When we rode back the pack station a week later, there were several signs nailed to the trees.   One said  "Forget Something?"  Cow outfits and packers run on coffee. They can sleep anywhere any time.

I'm a coffee snob at home, but on the trail, instant coffee suits me fine. Seriously, I can't stomach Folgers at work, but have no problem downing 2-3 cups while hiking. Go figure.

Context is very important in the outdoors g00se. 

Over on a canoe forum, cowboy coffee is the favorite by a wide margin.  

Instant works for me on the trail and in the field for work. Good coffee is reserved for the house...Im too cheap to buy a cup on the road at the prices some like to charge.

ppine said:

Context is very important in the outdoors g00se. 

Over on a canoe forum, cowboy coffee is the favorite by a wide margin.  

Canoes & Cowboy coffee are the reason I drink my coffee strong and black at home. I use to fill it up with flavored creamers. After a week in the Boundary Waters, with a cook who made the coffee strong enough to chew, I never went back to creamer. Which is probably why I don't want bad coffee--there's nothing to hide the flavor. 

g00se said:

".. I drink my coffee strong and black at home..."

There was a time when I packed an espresso maker and enjoyed Cuban style espresso.  I loved it, but my buddies think Joe so strong is an acquired taste.

Ed

I drink coffee at home but I quit a couple weeks before a trip and drink pre-workout on climbs.  I hate packing a stove and look for ways to carry less crap. 

Cold drinks mean I carry less fuel or sometimes no stove at all. 

Regardless if it's on the trail or at home, coffee only comes from one place for me – Camano Island Coffee Roasters. Everything else either tastes burnt or like battery acid. 

Their medium roast from Papua New Guinea (highly under-appreciated coffee region) is hands down the best coffee I've had, but others they other are nearly on par. This coffee is good enough to warrant the added weight of packing it in and out on trips - typically pour over in the backcountry and french press when car camping. 

Then again, I'm not dead set on having coffee every day no matter what (ppine's story of the 30-mile coffee excursion is absolutely nuts to me and I would have argued vehemently that such a thing was a wildly stupid idea). If I don't feel like taking coffee with me, I simply don't take it. Not worth the compromise in my opinion. 

October 24, 2020
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