Pot Shots

10:24 a.m. on July 24, 2019 (EDT)
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Another thread got me thinking more about this...I seem to take pictures of my cooking setup almost every trip and it brings back as many fond memories as the views and campsites. Anyone else do the same?  If so, share your favorite "pot shots" here...

Baking bannock on a low heat on an 8 degree (F) morning (and thawing out the Nalgene I forgot to bring in the tent)...
20161211_080834.jpgA last night trip dinner consisting of leftovers simmering...barley, soup mix, dehydrated vegetables...a standard last meal after eating all the heavier stuff on a long trip...
20170916_182042.jpgWhile I try not to use regular campsites, ones with a nice flat kitchen rock are hard to pass by...
20161209_175254.jpg


2:28 p.m. on July 24, 2019 (EDT)
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Nice, nothing like some good Pot shots. What a valuable piece of gear. I like how you described some of what you cooked.

Here is an good old shot of cooking soup or tea over a handful of sticks, the stove supported by Purcell Trench Stix.


7983C9EF-AB8E-4F51-9C1C-16E2CB0FB881.jpg

9:23 p.m. on July 24, 2019 (EDT)
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For water boil only: Trail Designs Keg-F. The pot is a 750ml Foster's beer can with the top cut off, with ridge lines pressed into it for strength. The caldera cone is matched to the diameter of the pot. The caddy that holds it all and protects it (center-right in photo) unscrews and becomes two serving vessels, either a mug and bowl or two bowls.
xx.jpgTrail Designs uses my photo as the main background on their Facebook page.

10:15 a.m. on July 26, 2019 (EDT)
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Trying to boil water @ 8F. Even with remote canister I had to cup the canister in my hands to achieve a boil:


DSCN4059-M.jpg

Testing the Biolite CookStove for Trailspace:

DSCN9688.jpg

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Cooking up a big breakfast of turkey bacon and hashbrowns while camping with the wife:



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12:55 p.m. on July 27, 2019 (EDT)
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Nice shots! I recognize that pan Patrick...and the bacon!

JR that's pretty cool...not enough to make me get a Facebook account for the first time but I did go to the web version and check it out!

Ghostdog...with all the rock around that site I'm surprised you found wood to burn.

5:47 p.m. on July 27, 2019 (EDT)
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“Ghostdog...with all the rock around that site I'm surprised you found wood to burn.”

That is just the narrow view of the photo but there is scattered wood here and there but nothing very big. It only took one handful of thumb size sticks.

The Sonoran desert is richer in both flora and fauna than any other desert so there is wood if one is economical with it. But the canister stove will fire up instantly in inclement weather to afford a quick hot drink, the quickest way to warm up and keep a friend from becoming hypothermic. Or just to enjoy a thirst quenching tea without burning down the entire mountain in the bone dry and windy times.

Now a couple of the places we frequent these days don’t allow fires or alcohol stoves either but one of our favorite stoves is the Kovea Spider, a very efficient stove with the windscreen, which is allowed. Here is a shot sans windscreen that shows time and place.



8B26CF6D-6BE4-41D1-BCDB-5329CF0C5236.jpg


7:37 p.m. on July 27, 2019 (EDT)
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My delightful wife making tea on a pocket rocket in our Walmart grease can.  Cheap, light, and easy to find.   The pot, that is! 

 

Hu3sZyIM2IH28oRJnu6Gz9oZM8QW2F9Te_RZOc0s

7:39 p.m. on July 27, 2019 (EDT)
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ghostdog said:

".. But the canister stove will fire up instantly in inclement weather to afford a quick hot drink, the quickest way to warm up and keep a friend from becoming hypothermic..."



Umm...  The physics don't support this concept.  A boiling hot cup of anything is unlikely to have much affect, preventing hypothermia, as the volume of a beverage vessel is a pittance to the volume of a human body you are attempting to warm.  Hoping to stave hypothermia with a cup of tea is like hoping to extinguish a warehouse fire with a garden hose.

Ed

7:40 p.m. on July 27, 2019 (EDT)
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balzaccom said:

My delightful wife making tea on a pocket rocket in our Walmart grease can.  Cheap, light, and easy to find.   The pot, that is! 

 

Hu3sZyIM2IH28oRJnu6Gz9oZM8QW2F9Te_RZOc0s

 Yea, well beautiful picture.. ..and you are a lucky man:)

Ed

7:48 p.m. on July 27, 2019 (EDT)
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whomeworry said:

ghostdog said:

".. But the canister stove will fire up instantly in inclement weather to afford a quick hot drink, the quickest way to warm up and keep a friend from becoming hypothermic..."



Umm...  The physics don't support this concept.  A boiling hot cup of anything is unlikely to have much affect, preventing hypothermia, as the volume of a beverage vessel is a pittance to the volume of a human body you are attempting to warm.  Hoping to stave hypothermia with a cup of tea is like hoping to extinguish a warehouse fire with a garden hose.

Ed

 

Im talking about reality Ed. 

8:36 p.m. on July 27, 2019 (EDT)
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In the 19th century when they ran low on tea they drank hot water to help them keep warm and called that silver tea. This is not a new concept. When I’m a little cold and drink a hot beverage out there I actually have to open my coat. That is the reality. My body may be acclimated differently than yours at least in winter as we do not heat our house above 60° and it would go down to 52° at times so our metabolism might be more similar to someone who more or less lives outdoors. We have decided to start keeping it at 65 for the winter months now. That will be luxurious warmth to us.

Now you don’t want to try to treat severe hypothermia victims with a hot drink. That might give them a heart attack. Strangely enough they put those kind of victims in an ice bath and very gradually warm that bath up but I’m not advocating you try that either unless you are a c doctor who is experienced in that procedure.

8:47 p.m. on July 28, 2019 (EDT)
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ghostdog said:

Im talking about reality Ed. 

Actually, other than the comments about the ice bath, the reality you describe is subjective feeling, not actual, objective, physical changes.  You mention having to open your coat.  Most of our sensations of warmth are derived through nerves in our skin, not our body core.  Case in point: victims in the advanced stages of hypothermia often shed clothing as shock causes the capillaries in their skin to dilate, and deliver warm blood to the skin.  They feel warm; nevertheless remain very chilled.  The increased blood flow to the skin causes increased loss of core temperature, and they die half naked.  Similar subjective experiences are had by those hitting the sauce too hard at cold temperatures.  The warmth felt in all of these instances is subjective; having no bearing on core body temperature.

Let’s look at the real reality of the situation. 

There is all sorts of resources on the web and Wikipedia that explain the science behind the principle concepts involved.  Start your search with “specific heat” and “specific heat capacity”.  Instead of spending the rest of my weekend attempting to explain all the science, I hope we can agree on this common sense observation:   

We are working with liquid water.  The hot beverage is mostly water, as are our bodies. 

Hopefully we can also agree on this common sense deduction:

The amount of heat you can raise one volume of water by transferring that heat from another volume of water is the result of the amount of heat transferred, and the ratio of the mass of the two volumes of water.  Let’s assume for the moment both volumes are 1 cup of water.  Since both volumes of are of equal mass, lowering the temperature 1⁰ in one cup will be matched by a 1⁰ increase in temperature of the other cup.   If the cup we are warming was twice the the volume of other cup, the ratio of their masses is now 1:2 (otherwise known as ½ or .5): therefore the larger cup would warm only 1/2⁰ for every degree the other cup is cooled by the process.

Speaking to the hypothermic person issue: 

The weight of 1 cup of water is 8 ounces.  If we assume a moderately light person of 150 pounds (2400 ounces), the ratio of the masses is 1:300 (otherwise known as 1/300 or ~.003).  Thus to raise the body temperature of this person by 1⁰F, the cup of water would need to be 332⁰F, assuming we can transfer heat from the water until it is frozen.  Obviously someone hypodermic needs to be warmed more than 1⁰F; as well, the water cannot be heated beyond 212⁰F, not to mention most people cannot ingest fluids hotter than 190⁰F.  And any case the ingested water will yield its heat until it is the same temperature as its surroundings (in the person’s stomach).  If we assume a ridiculously severe hypothermic individual with a 90⁰F core temperature and a blistering hot 190⁰F cup of water, the beverage will cool ~100⁰F, while warming the 150 pound person by (100⁰F * .003), resulting in a body temperature of 90.3⁰F.  If we use more typical numbers – 180 pound person, 95⁰F hypothermic core temperature, and a cup of water about the temperature of slightly cooled fresh brewed coffee (150⁰F), the body can be warmed to ~95.2⁰F.

Thus hot beverages provide comfort sensations, but they do little to change the actual temperature status of our body core.

Ed

8:55 p.m. on July 28, 2019 (EDT)
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I think there is another impact of the hot beverage.  I buy into the physics completely, but I also recognize that heating up the throat and mouth will also heat up any air entering the lungs.  that helps heat the body.

But yes, add one cup of hot water to a mass of 200 pounds, and see what kind of effect it has.  Not much.

8:55 p.m. on July 28, 2019 (EDT)
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Ed:  AND she backpacks!!!

Here she is working hard on the trail...

 

Vice3Rsd0NrTSoPbG0HJnCtQxnvSqYAAoBawI5R9

9:16 p.m. on July 28, 2019 (EDT)
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balzaccom said:

Ed:  AND she backpacks!!!

Here she is working hard on the trail...

 

Vice3Rsd0NrTSoPbG0HJnCtQxnvSqYAAoBawI5R9

Well Christ, Paul, it looks like directing you has plum worn her out!

Ed

11:10 a.m. on July 29, 2019 (EDT)
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Ahem. I was setting up the tent while she took a short siesta.  All part of making a marriage work! After forty-plus years, I hope we have figured it out.

2:38 p.m. on July 29, 2019 (EDT)
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Thwhomeworry said:

ghostdog said:

Im talking about reality Ed. 

Actually, other than the comments about the ice bath, the reality you describe is subjective feeling, not actual, objective, physical changes.  You mention having to open your coat.  Most of our sensations of warmth are derived through nerves in our skin, not our body core.  Case in point: victims in the advanced stages of hypothermia often shed clothing as shock causes the capillaries in their skin to dilate, and deliver warm blood to the skin.  They feel warm; nevertheless remain very chilled.  The increased blood flow to the skin causes increased loss of core temperature, and they die half naked.  Similar subjective experiences are had by those hitting the sauce too hard at cold temperatures.  The warmth felt in all of these instances is subjective; having no bearing on core body temperature.

Let’s look at the real reality of the situation. 

There is all sorts of resources on the web and Wikipedia that explain the science behind the principle concepts involved.  Start your search with “specific heat” and “specific heat capacity”.  Instead of spending the rest of my weekend attempting to explain all the science, I hope we can agree on this common sense observation:   

We are working with liquid water.  The hot beverage is mostly water, as are our bodies. 

Hopefully we can also agree on this common sense deduction:

The amount of heat you can raise one volume of water by transferring that heat from another volume of water is the result of the amount of heat transferred, and the ratio of the mass of the two volumes of water.  Let’s assume for the moment both volumes are 1 cup of water.  Since both volumes of are of equal mass, lowering the temperature 1⁰ in one cup will be matched by a 1⁰ increase in temperature of the other cup.   If the cup we are warming was twice the the volume of other cup, the ratio of their masses is now 1:2 (otherwise known as ½ or .5): therefore the larger cup would warm only 1/2⁰ for every degree the other cup is cooled by the process.

Speaking to the hypothermic person issue: 

The weight of 1 cup of water is 8 ounces.  If we assume a moderately light person of 150 pounds (2400 ounces), the ratio of the masses is 1:300 (otherwise known as 1/300 or ~.003).  Thus to raise the body temperature of this person by 1⁰F, the cup of water would need to be 332⁰F, assuming we can transfer heat from the water until it is frozen.  Obviously someone hypodermic needs to be warmed more than 1⁰F; as well, the water cannot be heated beyond 212⁰F, not to mention most people cannot ingest fluids hotter than 190⁰F.  And any case the ingested water will yield its heat until it is the same temperature as its surroundings (in the person’s stomach).  If we assume a ridiculously severe hypothermic individual with a 90⁰F core temperature and a blistering hot 190⁰F cup of water, the beverage will cool ~100⁰F, while warming the 150 pound person by (100⁰F * .003), resulting in a body temperature of 90.3⁰F.  If we use more typical numbers – 180 pound person, 95⁰F hypothermic core temperature, and a cup of water about the temperature of slightly cooled fresh brewed coffee (150⁰F), the body can be warmed to ~95.2⁰F.

Thus hot beverages provide comfort sensations, but they do little to change the actual temperature status of our body core.

Ed

 

Their OCD?

anyway some of us drink far more than 8 oz. How do you drink a little cup like that. With one’s pinky lifted? ;)

3:40 p.m. on July 29, 2019 (EDT)
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I guess we drifted away from cooking photos...internet threads do unwind.

Balzacom - congrats on 40 years!  We are 15 behind you with similar approach.  My missus likes to help around camp but I enjoy being able to give her a break and do more of the domestic stuff as I travel a lot for work so she shoulders that burden at home more than I do.

I think I said I took photos of my cooking setup almost every trip, but it seems like on the rare times I go back to my MSR or other stoves due to weather etc, I haven't photo'd them.  I guess that shows some favoritism on my part...

6:41 p.m. on July 29, 2019 (EDT)
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ghostdog said:

"..anyway some of us drink far more than 8 oz. How do you drink a little cup like that. With one’s pinky lifted? ;)"

We are talking about warming up hypodermic people, right?  Often they can't even ingest anything because they are in a stupor.  And getting them to cooperate often is almost impossible, let alone possessing the wherewithal to down a large volume of fluid.  Keep in mind you will probably have to hold it for them, too, as their hands will be numb to the point of non functioning.  So limber up that pinky! 

Even if we supersized to a manly quart of fluid, the 150 pound person would warm only to 91.2⁰F; and the 180 pound person would still have a temperature under 96⁰F.  Yea, OCD...

Ed

6:54 p.m. on July 29, 2019 (EDT)
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whomeworry said:

ghostdog said:

"..anyway some of us drink far more than 8 oz. How do you drink a little cup like that. With one’s pinky lifted? ;)"

We are talking about warming up hypodermic people, right?  Often they can't even ingest anything because they are in a stupor.  And getting them to cooperate often is almost impossible, let alone possessing the wherewithal to down a large volume of fluid.  Keep in mind you will probably have to hold it for them, too, as their hands will be numb to the point of non functioning.  So limber up that pinky! 

Even if we supersized to a manly quart of fluid, the 150 pound person would warm only to 91.2⁰F; and the 180 pound person would still have a temperature under 96⁰F.  Yea, OCD...

Ed

 

I’ve no idea where the voices are taking you but no, I said to keep a friend from becoming hypothermic. We drink half liter drinks throughout the day normally that add up to 3.3 L at home an we will heat all of those in winter. In the wild it adds up to 4 L. Since it does not matter and you are squirming to find an argument here I don’t see how I can explain reality any better and simply suggest continuing this thread with images as everyone on it has done so far but you.

I’d like to see your old Bluette stove if you have an image as I recently got through reading Solo Faces by James Spader where he used one.

5:42 p.m. on August 2, 2019 (EDT)
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It may be just car camping now, but this was also so many dinners in this same MSR pot and heat exchanger, with my previous Whisperlight, that I used on the trail for over twenty years. 

It still has that same "Ha!  Take -that-, Environment!" feeling of rising to a challenge that was so much fun when backpacking.
CampDomeWDinner.jpg

This particular dinner was an inexplicable favorite of fresh carrots boiled with overcooked rainbow rotini, drowned in butter and salt.  Nothing to brag about, especially for the true camp gourmets here, but I always sleep well and hike better the next day with it.

7:36 p.m. on August 3, 2019 (EDT)
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Read this after two weeks in the wilderness and started muttering about missing the animals. How hard is it to post pics of pots?


DSC03101a.jpgA new day dawns...

IMG_6185a.jpgMuffins in the kettle...

DSC02528a.jpgMuffins in the pot

DSC02510a.jpgMH can and trench grill...

DSC00946a.jpgMaking water in the pot with white gas...

DSC00742a.jpg
Making water in the kettle on a canister...
DSC00336a.jpgDinner at Garfield Shelter...

IMG_6218a.jpgBreakfast at Roaring Brook in BSP...

DSC00606a.jpgPiping hot boiled snow to fill the thermos...

QED

Hope that helps Phil :) You are in good company when it comes to taking pot shots it seems.

(No servers were killed to make this post. I only had to upload the last one. The others were already on the server.)

7:28 p.m. on August 4, 2019 (EDT)
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Happy summer, everybody!


IMG_2030.jpg

4:45 p.m. on September 5, 2019 (EDT)
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JRinGeorgia said: The pot is a 750ml Foster's beer can with the top cut off, with ridge lines pressed into it for strength.

How did you put the ridge lines on the can? I recently drank a Fosters beer, and after wards cut the top off with my P-38 can opener. And sanded down the cut lip so it won't cut my lips. Makes a great camp cup!

7:40 a.m. on September 6, 2019 (EDT)
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Trail Designs puts the ridges in. They probably would sell just a can rather than the whole cook kit if that's what you wanted.

9:37 a.m. on September 6, 2019 (EDT)
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P.S. they use a side-cutter can opener that removes the entire top and leaves a smooth edge, and they cut it without opening the pop-top so the cut- off top can serve as a lid (though I replaced it with alighter DIY lid).

1:20 p.m. on September 6, 2019 (EDT)
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I don't use it much, but  I had to have it.
I-m-a-little-teapot-.jpg

5:16 p.m. on September 6, 2019 (EDT)
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Love stove pics! This was my inaugural adventure with my Solo stove, taking my boys on a snowshoeing adventure and breaking halfway for hot chocolate and granola bars. :)
stove.jpg

November 17, 2019
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