Fixing my hiking boots before I need a new pair!

4:26 a.m. on March 18, 2018 (EDT)
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Hi, 


I have these Millet boots for about two years, not really used them intensively but nonetheless they are in bad shape. The front is peeling pretty bad and also the part connecting to the sole is starting to come off (2nd image).


MVIMG_20180318_075936_small.jpg
MVIMG_20180318_075942_small.jpg

Tested and looks like they are still waterproof but I'm planning a serious hike soon and I don't want to be in trouble mid-hike.

Do you think they can be fixed? what should I use?

and - Is this common for a boot? Never happened to me in other shoes I had...

thanks,
Noa

8:35 a.m. on March 18, 2018 (EDT)
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Foot gear is critical and those boots are toast.  Get a new pair and break them in before hand.  Only two years??  how were they stored?

12:02 p.m. on March 18, 2018 (EDT)
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I would use some shoe goo or similar product and take a test hike.  Chances are they will be fine.  I have a pair of logging boots that I bought in 1980.  They are heavy by today's standards, but still the best for walking on sidehills with no trails all day. 

5:02 a.m. on March 19, 2018 (EDT)
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@ppine link please?

5:05 a.m. on March 19, 2018 (EDT)
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ummm.... in my closet, no special attention. 

1. Actually they began tearing on their first hike (2-3 months after they were bought)

1a.do you think that's a hint they were not stored well in the store?

2. Any tips for next time boots maintenance? links for recommended products would be great.

Thanks!

6:23 a.m. on March 19, 2018 (EDT)
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The pics look like toe rot, that is why folks are asking about storage. You should tell your story to Millet. Let them know you have pics but don't send them unless they ask. Even now they may be of assistance in repairing or replacing the boots unless the damage was from something you did. Always worth a shot to start with the maker.

That being said, I agree with hikemor, these boots will not be happy again most likely. Shoe Goo would patch the holes and probably stick pretty well in that spot for a while, but the boot won't feel right on your feet. Time for something new.

9:04 a.m. on March 19, 2018 (EDT)
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1. what's toe rot??? any tips on how to avoid this for next time?

2. already sent to Millet, with the pics (why not send them?), pending a reply - they are french so it may take a while...

3. why would Shoe Goo would effect the way the boot feels?

thanks!

9:36 a.m. on March 19, 2018 (EDT)
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Something is seriously wrong if the boots showed problems on their first hike.  my quality leather boots last for at least a decade before developing problems.  Your boots must have had some defect when you bought them.

Good foot gear is absolutely crucial to any outdoor enterprise.  Get something good, fitted properly, and break them in well before you need to do anything significant with them.

In the old days (1950s, 60s, 70s) boots were leather, heavy, and a pain to break in, but then comfortable, long lasting, and dependable.  Today's shoes are lighter, much easier to break in (sometimes no break in at all), and less durable - just as expensive, however.

12:42 a.m. on March 20, 2018 (EDT)
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Noa:  Boy if that is what your boots look like, I'd hate to see what shape your dog was in after you stopped kicking him!  :)

Ed

3:44 a.m. on March 20, 2018 (EDT)
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people keep telling me I drag my feet when walking... probably the boot is too heavy for me, so I keep bumping into things, rocks mostly...

7:45 a.m. on March 20, 2018 (EDT)
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Sounds like you should come to Maine for some training hikes Noa. Roots and rocks are pretty much constant unless you're in a bog. Definitely a great place to learn to pick up your knees and toes on every step.

Seriously though, when shopping for your new boots look for something with a toe cap. I'm not talking a steel toe, but something with either a layer of protection over the toe or solid, hard leather. You can find even lighter weight, synthetic hiking boots or shoes with that feature. It will keep the boots and your toes from getting banged up as much.

8:50 a.m. on March 20, 2018 (EDT)
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My previous pair were REALLLY lightweight (Asolo) which was great, only the sole was so damaged after the first hike (Nepal, but still) so I thought I needed something more durable for rough terrain... 

Ideally I need lightweight + durable --> Any recommendations?

6:20 p.m. on March 21, 2018 (EDT)
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I've used Asolo, Scarpa and Vasque boots in very rugged conditions, mostly the  Sierra and western deserts, finding the soles wear out about the same time as the tops start getting tattered.  The damage you share with us I have never seen on boots, perhaps you do need to work on your footwork.

Ed

10:53 p.m. on March 21, 2018 (EDT)
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Hi Noa, having worked as a guide I found that at least 50% of clients needed instruction in how to walk off pavement! Lift the feet and place sole and heel flat on the ground, forget heel and toe. Take a bit of time to get used to this.

That said the wear on the toes as shown in the photos is such that a new pair of boots is probably a must; my current favoutites are Oboz and Keen. Oboz are better wearing but Keen are better waterproofed and have more grip in wet and muddy conditions. Both have really good toe bumpers and protect to a degree if you do inadvertantly kick a rock.

9:22 a.m. on March 22, 2018 (EDT)
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A bit off topic, just a bit. I've got three rubber bottom winter boots, an L.L.Bean Hunting shoe, Men's UGG Sorrel-like winter boot and a pair of low cut BOGS, all have holes or cracks in the rubber bottom-soles (On top, not the soles themselves). I looked at several You-Tube videos. Tire Inner tube patch kits, Gorrilla-Glue tape (Lasts one day, I tried that)...several suggested Shoe-Goo.

Anyone want to take up the mantle and make a suggestion or two?

10:27 a.m. on March 22, 2018 (EDT)
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My husband wears Zamberlan Vioz GTX hiking boots.  He is so hard on shoes and these have withstood the test.  They are a big investment, but well worth the money.  He searched for a product to coat the toes of his boots and found a real winner in 'Kg's Boot Guard'.  Great stuff!  It is like a truck bed liner for the tips of your boots.

12:46 p.m. on March 22, 2018 (EDT)
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On old climbing shoes I have used black neoprene wet suit repair cement to coat areas that had worn through with some success. 

1:34 p.m. on March 22, 2018 (EDT)
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Vickie R. said:

My husband wears Zamberlan Vioz GTX hiking boots.  He is so hard on shoes and these have withstood the test.  They are a big investment, but well worth the money.  He searched for a product to coat the toes of his boots and found a real winner in 'Kg's Boot Guard'.  Great stuff!  It is like a truck bed liner for the tips of your boots.

 I don't know the product but that is a great line for a review Vickie :)

9:50 a.m. on April 28, 2018 (EDT)
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Whatever you end up getting for new boots, something with a protective toe cap or rand is a good idea. 
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The toe cap on the Asolos on the right is hard as a rock, plus the sole protrudes a little bit and is also pretty hard. I have hundreds of miles on those in all seasons, the soles are too worn for serious hiking but the rest of the boots have a lot of life left.

The Lowas on the left have a rubber rand that extends a little farther back, but it’s not quite as hard. I only have maybe 50-60 miles on those, but they were wet, rocky, hard miles in Maine & New Hampshire. 

5:05 a.m. on April 29, 2018 (EDT)
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well in my last hike, the metal part holding the laces at the top (does that have a name?!) broke so I need a new pair no matter what.

@phil Smith I'll definitely look into an Asolo of this type. It only makes sense since my next trip is hiking in Italy :)

thank you!

1:21 p.m. on April 30, 2018 (EDT)
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Some people are not very careful with their foot placement.  I used to call my youngest brother Sasquatch when he was in the woods.  He crashed into everything, and wore his boots a lot faster than most people. 

2:07 a.m. on May 3, 2018 (EDT)
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Noa Regev said:

well in my last hike, the metal part holding the laces at the top (does that have a name?!) broke so I need a new pair no matter what.

Lace eyelets and hooks can be replaced by your local shoe and luggage repair shop for a very reasonable price.

Ed

July 17, 2018
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