kids sleeping bags

11:07 a.m. on December 17, 2014 (EST)
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My five year old daughter has been begging me to get her out on a hike, so this spring, we will be going on our first overnight. I know i'm carrying most everything for us, but I did get her a Deuter jr 18 ltr pack (can't wait for her to open it on christmas day!). What i'm having trouble with is finding a lightweight, very inexpensive sleeping bag for her. Needs to be pretty small as i'm going to be carrying it. Any suggestions would be great!

1:39 p.m. on December 17, 2014 (EST)
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Keep this quiet, but we just picked up a Kelty Little Flower 20°f bag for one of The Tot's Christmas presents. Mrs S found one on sale for $57 last week, no promises on this week's price.

Not the lightest at 3lbs according to the Kelty site, but a warm bag, at that price, which she can use for years made sense for us. My wife almost fits into this bag but her head sticks out too far to use the hood but The Tot should fit in there long enough to save up her own money to buy something lighter once she starts carrying it herself :p

edit: Oh and a bit of unsolicited advice: keep pack weight really low for your daughter. Anything more than a few pounds is really bad for the little ones bones and attitudes!

7:29 p.m. on December 17, 2014 (EST)
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There are several kids bags in my latest flyer from Campmor, they may have even more choices on their website.

They have kid size Kelty, Coleman, Eureka, Slumberjack, as well as the more expensive brands.

As short as I am I can almost curl up and fit in one.

10:38 p.m. on December 18, 2014 (EST)
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1.  synthetic fill.  children, especially the smaller ones, will get the bag a little damp if it rains, no matter how much you try to avoid that.

2.  nylon shell, not a shell that feels like flannel or pajamas...both of which have the unfortunately propensity to absorb water.  

3.  the cheap but heavy/bulky options at many general-purpose stores (walmart, target) have not been great for us.  kids don't just use bags to sleep in - they roll down hills in them, wrestle in and around them, and otherwise test their durability much more than you might imagine.  one of my kids managed to tear almost the entire main zipper away from a cheap bag.  not a fun night.  in my opinion, worth spending a few dollars more for a bag from a manufacturer that is thinking about hiking, not just general purpose use or car camping.  we have good kids' bags from both north face and kelty.

4.  consider whether it has a hood or not.  a lot of kids bags lack a hood.  my kids fight over this - they all prefer the bag with the hood.  

1:06 p.m. on December 19, 2014 (EST)
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For small kids, I use a down parka with the bottom closed up with safety pins. You can zip them into it.

For medium sized kids I would use blankets in warmer weather which is when most kids like to go camping.

Once they get bigger I would buy them an adult sleeping bag and let them grow into it.

I bought my niece a kids sleeping bag once. She rarely used it and gave it away.

 

9:20 a.m. on December 22, 2014 (EST)
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the blanket idea sounds really good. i already have a couple of nice fleece blankets. I think I may just stick with those until she gets a bit older. Didn't even think about that for some odd reason.

10:48 a.m. on December 22, 2014 (EST)
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I have five kids and only ever owned two kid sized bags.  I find that my kids usually sleep completely inside their bags and never use the attached hoods.  I usually just buy them full-sized synthatic sleeping bags and plan on carrying extra weight myself.  My personal bag is tiny and down so the kid's extra sleeping bag doesn't make a huge difference in my pack. 

11:46 a.m. on December 23, 2014 (EST)
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FromSagetoSnow said:

I have five kids and only ever owned two kid sized bags.  I find that my kids usually sleep completely inside their bags and never use the attached hoods.  I usually just buy them full-sized synthatic sleeping bags and plan on carrying extra weight myself.  My personal bag is tiny and down so the kid's extra sleeping bag doesn't make a huge difference in my pack. 

 I'm thinking of taking my 10yo next weekend. With lows forecasted for mid-20's, I thought about just sticking him in one of my 15F bags. He can "sink" to the bottom and pull the top in behind him.

September 21, 2019
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