Large Tipi Tents

3:23 a.m. on December 25, 2015 (EST)
102 reviewer rep
300 forum posts

Hey guys...

I was looking at the Seek Outdoors 8 person Tipi, and although I am not in the market for one right now I was wondering if any of you have used them.  I have a pyramid tent, and they shed wind very well.  But when you start getting into the bigger base camp style tents I was curious how they handled the wind.  They seem very well made, but I wanted get an idea of using one from those that have them.  Another question was how difficult they are to set up.

Snakey  

9:46 a.m. on December 25, 2015 (EST)
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4,075 forum posts

I have owned two traditional 18 foot tipis. They shed wind, are cool in summer and easy to heat with a fire.  I have slept in 8 foot and 10 foot range tipis.  The design has been around a long time.  A smaller nylon tipi tent is easy to set up as they usually have only one pole with stakes and maybe some tie outs. 

1:37 p.m. on December 25, 2015 (EST)
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300 forum posts

ppine said:

I have owned two traditional 18 foot tipis. They shed wind, are cool in summer and easy to heat with a fire.  I have slept in 8 foot and 10 foot range tipis.  The design has been around a long time.  A smaller nylon tipi tent is easy to set up as they usually have only one pole with stakes and maybe some tie outs. 

 Thanks...

I figured that, I was just concerned that will all the extra area the tent put forth, it may be less resistant to the wind.  

3:00 p.m. on December 25, 2015 (EST)
295 reviewer rep
1,436 forum posts

Several months ago I did a google search on Seek Outside tipis and found several forum discussions on both these tipis and how they compare to Kifaru tipis.  Start with this---

http://seekoutside.com/forums/

http://seekoutside.com/products/liners-and-nests/

These tipis have available liners and a dedicated stove jacks, two benefits to this design. 

Of course, having a center pole makes the smallest such tipis almost unusable since you must sleep to the side of the pole whereby the foot of your sleeping bag could touch the angled side wall.  This isn't a problem on the larger sizes.

Here is where a liner is a must for winter camping---to keep condensation away from you and your gear. 

And without a floor you are subject to ground water and lake effect, something that happens regularly in the Southeast where I backpack.  A good floor in a good tent will keep all ground out of your living space.

4:52 p.m. on December 25, 2015 (EST)
BRAND REP
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378 forum posts

Often folk will quote how strong a tipi can be by mentioning either the original native American version or the type used at the South Pole.

Both of those have several very thick (heavy) poles holding up the fabric so not comperable at all with the single pole UL (hiking) versions.

The polar type (pyramid)  for example usually has 4 x 1" poles.

2:37 p.m. on December 30, 2015 (EST)
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300 forum posts

Anyone ever see the Mansfield Outdoors tipi's ?  

http://www.mansfieldoutdoors.com/tent-design/

April 8, 2020
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