In-tent heating...

9:42 p.m. on October 11, 2016 (EDT)
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I've recently picked up a UCO candle lantern, and I love the little thing. I've got the hang-on reflector and a pie-tin dome reflector, and find it to be a great option for in-tent lighting and warmth. With the increased BTUs of the Beeswax candle it really puts out impressive heat.

Otherwise, I hot tent a ammo-box wood stove in my BD Megalight. Nothing like a crackling fire in your tent.

8:38 a.m. on October 12, 2016 (EDT)
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I lived in a tipi for many years and know all about the benefits of wood heat and the wonderful warmth of a woodstove.  Several shelters I lived in had either wood heat or a propane heater.  I never really carried or used a Hot Tent though I consider it on occasion.

I used to carry a vintage candle lantern (1980) and dealt with melted wax gumming up the works because there's a spring under the candle and once the candle melts completely the spring and everything else got plugged up with melted wax.  Useless and difficult to field clean unless you build a campfire and melt all the wax.

My current in-tent candle warming comes from a blistex container as a holder and bringing several Manischewitz 3-hour candles.  I have found these candles burn clean with a bright warm flame.  (Although lately their quality control is lacking due to double wick candles).


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Most people would say an open flame in a tent is a big NO NO but use common sense and don't worry about it.  The only purpose of my candle is to provide hand warm for in-tent living on butt cold trips.  It's not used for light or really to warm up the tent.  My -15F down bag does that.

10:58 a.m. on October 12, 2016 (EDT)
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A couple years ago, Barb and I went on a dog-sledding expedition in Alaska. We had an Arctic Oven tent, which was designed and made for using a wood stove inside. For example, the chimney goes through a fire-proof passage through the tent top (some tents intended for use with a stove run the chimney through a sidewall "window" that has a fireproof surround at the wall passage)

Important things to watch - be careful with the burning wood to make sure that all sparks stay inside the stove, and make sure there is plenty of ventilation - you do not want the oxygen to be deletetd, and you want the carbon monoxide that is generated to get exhausted up the chimney.

Using fire inside a snow cave (which I have done many times) requires having sufficient ventilation as well. Candle lanterns and kerosene lanterns contain the flames well - just don't knock them over onto your sleeping bag with its flammable outer shell.

First-timers should get help and tutoring from an experienced mentor.


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Stove inside the Arctic Oven


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The Arctic Oven

11:40 a.m. on October 12, 2016 (EDT)
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Thanks for the review on the Arctic Oven. I have never seen one but have heard of them a lot. 

I have lived in a wall tent with a wood stove for a month. Even in the snow it is quite comfortable.

Canvas and stoves have been used by horse packers and canoeists for more than a century.  Now we are finally getting around to backpacking equipment.

The simple solution for hiking, is a lean-to tarp with a fire in front. Try it sometime.

2:13 p.m. on October 12, 2016 (EDT)
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pillowthread said:

I've recently picked up a UCO candle lantern, and I love the little thing. I've got the hang-on reflector and a pie-tin dome reflector, and find it to be a great option for in-tent lighting and warmth. With the increased BTUs of the Beeswax candle it really puts out impressive heat.

Otherwise, I hot tent a ammo-box wood stove in my BD Megalight. Nothing like a crackling fire in your tent.

 You going to have to post some pictures so I can see how this is setup..I has the chance at a seeks outside Tipi but i passed it up.Not cold enough where I am at to justify it...I'd have to go to the whites for the whole winter back and forth.LOL

3:06 p.m. on October 12, 2016 (EDT)
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I've thought a lot about all these tipi hot tents---Kifaru, Titanium Goat, Seek Outside, several more.  I spend a lot of time sitting in a cold tent during my winter trips and fondly remember my big Tipi woodstove and its massive wood supply, even though that tipi was not portable as with the above.

The hot tents generally are pretty heavy (and dang expensive) when you include a ground cloth floor, a liner, a stove big enough to hold a fire for an hour or more, and other considerations---

Like no floor, like spindrift, like dealing with hot ashes when there's no snow but high wind in a very dry winter landscape, like ash pinholes in the expensive fabric, like single wall condensation when you don't use the stove, like a center pole which eats up usable space on the smaller tipis.  I came up with a 10-12 lb figure for a full winter Kifaru setup including all the doodads.  My current tunnel tent weights around 8 lbs 10 oz but it has no stove of course.  It keeps me alive in the winter and my Puma bag is my woodstove.  Along with my down parka and down pants.

On a long backpacking trip you spend a lot of time packing up in the morning and setting up day's end---and I don't want to be fumbling with hot stove ashes or sheet metal or whatever else.  And I really want a shelter with a sewn-in floor. 

1:59 p.m. on December 16, 2016 (EST)
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I've used a "Candoil" lantern to keep a two person tent nice and warm. This lantern uses lantern "oil" (scented ultra clear kerosene) and burns far longer than a candle lantern. But if the wick is too long it will create greasy soot which is a mess.

Just remember to blow it out before going to sleep!

7:11 p.m. on December 16, 2016 (EST)
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I've thought about using this miniature Coleman lantern that I take with me on overnight hikes but have never used it for multi day excursions due to wasting fuel I might need for cooking. 

other than that and ventilation needed which may defeat the purpose it gives off great heat and is darn near as good a lite source as a full size  glass lantern. It has an aluminum screen like a metal grate and a wire with ring for hanging. And weighs absolutely nothing 

whats yalls opinion?  I had it in mind to try out New Year's Eve if I get to go. To warm the tent.

10:09 p.m. on December 16, 2016 (EST)
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One of my favorite tent "heaters":

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I'll take 8 oz for a 12 day trip - little sips go a long way.

I generally don't use candles in my tents - tent mates have a habit of upsetting the candle and waxing up my sleeping bag and gear - instead I rely on a good warm bag.  FYI: the typical candle generates about 1600 watts heat, which is about the same as a human body. 

But I do use a candle to cut condensation in my Hyperlite cuben pyramid tarp.  There are two vents on this tent, just under the peak.  I position the candle on the mast pole 18" from the peak.  The candle heat accelerates the preexisting draft, carrying air out the vents, along with the humidity.  It significantly lowers condensation, albeit at the expense of also losing some heat built up in the tent.  But I prefer a dry interior over all other considerations.

Bill S said:

"..Using fire inside a snow cave (which I have done many times) requires having sufficient ventilation as well..."

And snow shelters may require vigilance to assure spindrift doesn't block up vent holes.  One can rig a candle to hang beneath a ceiling vent hole.  The heat will keep the vent open, but ironically a candle used thusly may significantly reduce the interior temperature of the cave, due to increased air circulation caused by this set up.

ppine said:

"..The simple solution for hiking, is a lean-to tarp with a fire in front. Try it sometime..."

Indian fire on steroids.  Adding a tarp to the opposite side of the fire will provide even greater efficiency to this set up.  Space blankets are excellent in this application.

300winmag said:

"I've used a "Candoil" lantern to keep a two person tent nice and warm. This lantern uses lantern "oil" (scented ultra clear kerosene) and burns far longer than a candle lantern. But if the wick is too long it will create greasy soot which is a mess..."

I like the efficiency but freak about liquid or pressurized fuels in tents.  I prefer not to use liquid fuel candles or stoves in a tent - the risk of a spill and resulting emergency are not worth whatever gains these fuels provide IMO.  My experiences bear out it is just a matter of time until tent mates manage to create these circumstances.

Ed

10:45 a.m. on December 17, 2016 (EST)
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I want to go on a trip with Ed. I like the way he thinks.

1:04 p.m. on December 17, 2016 (EST)
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Me to...I like the way he drinks!

9:50 p.m. on January 13, 2017 (EST)
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I have often used telescoping candle lanterns and later Candoil backpacking oil lamps. they warm double wall tents (ripstop inner walls, not netting inner walls) by about 20 F. above what your body heat will do.

And then yes, there is always a dram of good Scotch or Jack Daniwls to be had as a "nightcap". But remember, alcohol dilates blood vessels, helping you lose heat faster so use moderation. (For some that means no more than 5 or 6 shots. ;o)

9:58 p.m. on January 13, 2017 (EST)
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I seem to self regulate the scotch drinking. This time of year it gets too cold so you really can't taste the flavor of good scotch. Ends up not being worth the weight to carry much more than a nightry dram to warm your insides. I drink it neat at home so just don't enjoy it that cold.

For tent heating, I used to use a candle lantern and just restarted that practice with a tea candle lantern.  Time and temp will tell if that really works.

10:17 p.m. on January 19, 2017 (EST)
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Ed,

Candoil backpacking lanterns are not pressurized and if the wick/lid is properly screwed down after filling there is absolutely no danger of the oil spilling. As I mentioned, the is a chance of soot buildup from pulling the wick out to far in an effort to get a larger flame.  The soot will then fall out on your bag and tent floor. (Don't ask...)

Unfortunately I think Candoil lanterns are no longer made.

Eric B.

7:14 a.m. on January 20, 2017 (EST)
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Personally, I won't have an open flame in my tent.  It's inviting disaster to visit.  To each his own.

November 18, 2019
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